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Despite Official Appeal, Most Migrant Workers Staying Back in Gurgaon Have Not Been Paid
A survey finds that even more than wages denied, what concerns the labourers is the silence of their employers on the prospect of future work.

Despite Official Appeal, Most Migrant Workers Staying Back in Gurgaon Have Not Been Paid

Representative image of migrants waiting to board a train. Photo: PTI

Gaurav Vivek Bhatnagar

Gaurav Vivek Bhatnagar


GOVERNMENT
HEALTH
LABOUR
RIGHTS

15 HOURS AGO

New Delhi:
A rapid survey of around 100 migrant workers who have decided to stay back in Gurgaon, now called Gurugram, has revealed that many of them have not been paid their wages for April, during the nationwide lockdown.
Even more than the wages denied in spite of a government appeal, what concerns the labourers at this point is the fact that the industries or units they worked for earlier have not approached them to resume work. Amidst such uncertainty, and with labour unions also proving to be of little assistance, the decision to stay back has proven to be a costly one for them.
The survey was jointly done by the Safe In India Foundation (SII) which assists injured workers with insurance claims, healthcare and compensations, and Agrasar, an organisation that works on employability and social security of migrant labourers. It took place over a week in the middle of May.

In the dark
Speaking to The Wire, Agrasar co-founder Prerit Rana said the workers were approached over phone. “The two organisations have been working with them for 10 years and have a data base that covers workers from all sectors. The interview covered workers from auto ancillary, garment and rubber units, among others,” he said.

Rana added that one of the biggest concerns among the workers was that there was no communication from their respective factories on when they could resume work. “On the other hand,” he said, “companies are also struggling to find workers.”
Explaining the reason for this “complete information asymmetry,” Rana said it was because most companies operated through a chain of contractors and sub-contractors. However, he said, it should not be difficult for the principal employers to get in direct contact with the workers since they have ample records in the form of diary entries and other compliance documents.
Rana said some companies have also started reopening operations in Gurgaon. However, migrant workers still do not have access to information on job requirements.
Wages not paid for March, April despite government appeal
The survey, that assessed the wage situation, said the condition of the migrant workers has become much worse and urgent action is required by the government to support them.
Its findings revealed that around 75% of the workers had not been paid for the month of April as the lockdown was extended. This was a “massive worsening” over March 2020, for which around 25% did not receive their full wages despite government announcements to not deduct salaries.
In view of the findings, the report said:
“It is clear that the government directive to pay full salaries was ineffective. Now that this directive is withdrawn completely, the need for government support for these migrant workers is further intensified.
This should have been anticipated better. The food and cash support for workers must be accelerated and the government schemes designed and implemented with speed and effectiveness, in partnership with on the ground CSOs.”




Migrants travelling from Gurgaon to reach their native place Bulandshahr being stopped at Delhi- UP border, in New Delhi, Tuesday, May 19, 2020. Photo: PTI


Workers resign themselves to non-payment of wages
The report also revealed that almost 50% of those workers had accepted the fact that their wages were not paid. One of the workers, Golu, who is employed as a driver, said, “When they did not pay the salary in March, how will they pay in April?”
“Only a minority (18%) of the workers had the hope or courage to call their employers or contractors to ask for their wages,” the study said.
Most have not left yet
The survey also revealed that 77% of the workers have remained at their pre-COVID-19 residences, near places of their pre-COVID-19 work, instead of returning to their native places. As many as 57% of them said in the survey that they have received a call from their employer or contractor regarding their jobs. Others hope to get a similar call soon.
A huge majority of 86% of these workers, who have stayed back, want to go back to the same job in the same company that they worked for after the lockdown. They probably see no alternatives in sight, said the study.


Sandeep Sachdeva, co-founder of SII, said “about 70-75% of them (migrant workers) are staying back in Gurgaon hoping to get a job while the government schemes, inadequate as they are for migrants, are not reaching them well enough. Who is going to give them employment or adequate sustenance until the economy revives? And how?”
Incidentally, while 95% of the surveyed workers were not members of any union, the survey revealed that the “even the five, that are members of a union,” said they received “no help” from them. It quoted one of them, Upendra, who is a tailor by profession, as saying that he was part of a union but it had been of little assistance at this time.


Despite Official Appeal, Most Migrant Workers Staying Back in Gurgaon Have Not Been Paid
 

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Lockdown forces many to change profession

CITIES Updated: May 25, 2020 01:30 IST
Sajana Nambiar

Sajana Nambiar


For the past 14 years, Kalyan Harale, a resident of Ulhasnagar, used to leave his home around 7am to reach his office in Santacruz. The lockdown announced on March 22 changed it all. The real estate firm shut, leaving Harale, who worked in the administration section, jobless.
Faced with the responsibility of his wife, 22-year-old engineering student son and elderly parents, the 48-year-old decided to start selling vegetables on a cart in Siddharth Nagar in Ulhasnagar.
“It has been two months now. As I saw residents struggle to get vegetables in the initial phase of the lockdown, I decided to do the job,” said Harale.
“I got in touch with local vegetable traders and started to sell vegetables on a hand cart. I earn around ₹300 a day and make half of my monthly salary, but we are managing.”
Harale is one of the many who had to change their means of livelihood to sustain the lockdown.
Another case in point: Raju Bausakar, 52, a resident of Dombivli, who has a photocopy shop near Brahman Sabha hall in Dombivli (East), now sells biscuits and bread outside it. “Since I opened my shop 30 years ago, I have never shut it for such a long period. I used to earn at least ₹15,000 a month. One of my daughters work, but I don’t like sitting idle. I go out and earn whatever little I can. I set up the stall at least thrice a week,” said Bausakar, who lives with his wife and two daughters.
For Smita Palsekar, 47, a Kalyan resident, whose husband is bed-ridden after an accident, and who has two school-going children, not earning was not an option.
“I have a fabric shop in Khadakpada in Kalyan (West), which has been shut for two months now. I used to earn around ₹60,000 a month. I now sell vegetables at housing societies, which give me permission to enter,” said Palsekar.
She hired a pick-up for ₹15,000 a month to transport and sell vegetables. She earns around ₹1,500 a day. “I have got several regular customers in housing societies. I also take orders in advance,” she said.
Santosh Gupta, 36, who has a laundry shop at Adharwadi in Kalyan, now goes out on a bicycle every morning to sell bananas. His family of three is in Madhya Pradesh.
“I came to Kalyan as a construction worker and later opened a laundry shop. After the lockdown was announced, my friends gave me the idea of selling bananas. I get ₹40 for a dozen and manage to earn ₹800 a day,” said Gupta.
“I have to send at least ₹10,000 to my family. I used to earn around ₹40,000 from the laundry shop, but I have to adapt to the changing circumstances. It is better than not earning at all.”


Lockdown forces many to change profession
 

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Squabble over use of 100W bulb ends in tenant’s death in Delhi

The e-rickshaw driver, 35-year-old Jagdesh from Aligarh in Uttar Pradesh, lived in the house for the last two years with his wife, Varsha, and their eight-year-old daughter.

DELHI Updated: May 25, 2020 00:13 IST
Shiv Sunny

Shiv Sunny
Hindustan Times, New Delhi

A petty argument over the use of a 100 watt bulb between a homeowner and his tenant took a violent turn on Friday


A petty argument over the use of a 100 watt bulb between a homeowner and his tenant took a violent turn on Friday

A petty argument over the use of a 100 watt bulb between a homeowner and his tenant took a violent turn on Friday when an e-rickshaw driver died after he was allegedly slapped by his landlord and, while reeling from the impact, his head hit the wooden armrest of a sofa, police said.
The e-rickshaw driver, 35-year-old Jagdesh from Aligarh in Uttar Pradesh, lived in the house for the last two years with his wife, Varsha, and their eight-year-old daughter.
The homeowner, Amit, has been booked for culpable homicide not amounting to murder, under Section 304 of the Indian Penal Code, and has been arrested, said Ved Prakash Surya, deputy commissioner of police (north-east).
“Jagdesh would drive a rented e-rickshaw to make a living. His wife is a homemaker. During the lockdown, they had not been earning anything, but they didn’t go back to Aligarh as we have no work back home. Jagdesh was expecting work to resume soon,” said a second senior police officer familiar with the case who asked not to be named.

They paid a monthly rent of ₹5,000, which included the electricity bill. “Their owner of the house is a blacksmith, and he too hadn’t been earning anything either during the lockdown. He wanted to keep the electricity bills low to save money,” the second officer said.
According to the police complaint, at around 7pm on Friday, Amit walked up to Jagdesh’s flat and found his wife using a 100 watt bulb. “He got angry with me for using that bulb. I tried to tell him that I needed more light for cooking, but he removed the bulb and left,” Varsha said to the police in her statement. She also alleged that Amit was drunk at that time, but police could not substantiate this allegation.
According to Varsha, Amit returned with a bulb that consumed less power sometime later but began scolding her again. “My husband who was lying down on a broken sofa placed on the terrace at that time asked him not to scream. That made Amit angry. He walked to the terrace and slapped my husband hard,” she alleged.

As per the allegations made by Varsha, the slap caused Jagdesh to fall, and his head to hit the wooden armrest of the broken sofa. “He fell unconscious. I sought help from a relative to take him to GTB hospital in his e-rickshaw,” said Varsha in her complaint.
Jagdesh succumbed to his injuries on Saturday at the hospital. The police quoted a doctor as saying that he died of head injuries. Amit was arrested shortly afterwards and his statement recorded. According to the police, he said that he wanted to lower power consumption, as he was financially distressed due to slowdown in business.


Squabble over use of 100W bulb ends in tenant’s death in Delhi
 

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Micromanager Modi Gives 58-Point Stimulus Package But No Solution

By Aditya Menon


Updated : 19 MAY 2020, 08:29 AM IST

“Micromanager in chief” this is how the Wall Street Journal described Prime Minister Narendra Modi in a March 2017 article, a few months after he announced the demonetisation of Rs 1,000 and Rs 500 currency notes.

The article described how Modi took this decision almost unilaterally, consulting only a handful of close advisers, keeping much of the government in the dark.

A related allegation that is often made against Prime Minister Narendra Modi is that his policies – like demonetisation and the Goods and Services Tax – end up increasing bureaucratic control and interference, going against his own principle of “minimum government, maximum governance.”

This trend appears to have continued well into the first year of Modi’s second term in office. And his “stimulus package” to deal with the aftermath of the COVID-19 crisis is a case in point.

In the five tranches or sets of announcements, one could count as many as 58 different measures.

These measures range from an immediate measure like free food grain supply to migrants to something as unrelated as “opening up future exploration in inter-planetary travel to private players”.

Also Read: ‘Announce Revised Fiscal Stimulus’: Chidambaram on Govt’s Package

For Union Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, it was almost like a second Union Budget. Perhaps more than that – if the Budget is a three-hour movie without an interval, the COVID-19 stimulus package was more like a web series spread across several episodes.

So the question is: Did the micromanager-in-chief miss the woods for the trees?

Many would think so.

Package Ignores Core Issue – Demand

The stimulus package gave a lot of headlines focusing on ‘Rs 20 lakh crore’, ‘10 percent of the GDP’, or ‘Atmanirbhar Bharat’.

But several firms pointed out that the Modi government’s package fails to address the core issue – boosting demand.

Nomura India said that the “government will need to step in again in the coming quarters for reviving growth through demand stimulus.” Goldman Sachs predicted that the package may not have any effect on immediate growth revival. And Morgan Stanley said that the package will have a low fiscal multiplier effect.

According to Emkay Global, “10 percent of GDP package is worth grabbing headlines. However, it is not clear how many of the measures are related to the ongoing pandemic”.

Another securities research firm Sanford Bernstein termed the package “a lost opportunity” and a set of “generic announcements”.

Not surprisingly, markets responded negatively to the package with the BSE Sensex falling by 1,068.75 points on Monday 18 May.

This goes against the trend in Asian and European markets and this is largely due to a disappointing stimulus package.

Analysts say that this is because the package focuses mainly on providing credit and doesn’t boost consumption.

Also Read: Economic Stimulus Package: Why Every Policy Change Is Not A Reform

An industry as crucial as the automobile sector is complaining that it has been “left out” despite suffering a massive loss of jobs.

So despite laying out a massive 58-point exercise, the Modi government’s package is failing to create the impact that was required.

What Should Govt Have Done?

Rather than an elaborate plan, the government need a few big ticket measures aimed at boosting consumption and addressing the immediate needs of the most vulnerable sections.

The fundamental need was income support, which the government left largely unaddressed.

In contrast to India, Canada, which has already begun rolling out its stimulus package, has doubled direct spending on the crisis to $52 billion

Anyone who has lost income due to the COVID-19 pandemic is qualified for aid of up to $2,000 a month for up to four months.

Even in terms of some of the welfare measures, the government of India could have done things differently.

Instead of a number of complicated measures that will involve a great deal of bureaucratic hassle in just identifying beneficiaries, a few simple measures may have had a wider impact.

For instance, a very large chunk of India’s poorest people has already been identified and covered under the Jan Dhan scheme. The government could easily have transferred a sizeable income support to all Jan Dhan account holders.

Instead what the government is giving is just Rs 500 per month for three months, that too just to female account holders.

Rs 500 per month is hardly going to be of any benefit to families who have lost jobs or sources of livelihood.

Similarly, the main step to address starvation is 5 kg or rice and 1 kg of chana per person per month for the next two months for migrants not having Food Security Act cards. And that too through the state government. This is hardly sufficient and doesn’t include essentials like salt, vegetable oil, milk, or sugar.

In addition to this, the government could very easily have gone for distribution of free foodgrains using the already existing PDS database.

Political Priorities

The rationale behind a large number of thinly spread out measures, instead of fewer, more concrete measures, appears to be political.

It helps the government maintain the support of a larger number of people, without doing anything substantial.

There is, however, a dichotomy here. For someone who micromanages policies, Modi doesn’t get into the details in his public addresses.

All the PM’s speeches on the COVID-19 lockdown have mainly focused on the broader narrative of “India’s success being recognised worldwide” or the need for “sacrifices” to be made by the people.

It seldom gets into concrete promises, which are then left to ministers like Nirmala Sitharaman. This insulates Modi from any possible policy failures, despite the fact that the policies bear his clear imprint.

Therefore given this style of leadership, big ticket measures may not be easy to come by.



 

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No one likes a micromanager: Here's how to deal with one

By Kathryn Vasel, CNN Business

Updated 1907 GMT (0307 HKT) May 5, 2020



(CNN)Editor's Note: A version of this story appeared in CNN's Work Transformed newsletter. To get it in your inbox, sign up for free here.

If you thought working from home meant escaping the grasp of your micromanaging boss, I've got bad news for you: It's likely to get worse.

When a micromanager has less control and contact, it usually amplifies their hovering.

They tend to operate out of anxiety, experts told me. So when employees work at home, it means micromanagers know less about your daily work schedule and no longer have drive-by desk visits or random check-ins to quell their anxiousness.

That might lead to more emails, phone calls or Slacks when you are trying to get your work done at home.


 

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Narendra Modi govt has failed India in its hour of need — both economy and people

As India goes for a free fall due to Covid and lockdown, insensitive would be too mild a word to characterise Modi government’s shameful handling of the crisis.

YOGENDRA YADAV20 May, 2020

[data:image/svg+xml;charset=utf-8,<svg height="392" width="696" xmlns="http://www][https://d2c7ipcroan06u]File photo | Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his ministers and officials interact with chief ministers via video conference | Photo: ANI

It’s time for plain speak. Another day of yet another peak of Covid-positive cases, another spate of reports about the plight of migrant workers on the roads and inside trucks, another day in office for imperious Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman bulldozing her way through hard questions about the economy that can no longer be set aside. Two months into this unprecedented health and economic crisis, it is time to assess the Narendra Modi government’s response to this disaster.

Let us not be unfair to the government. I have supported Prime Minister Modi when he first announced the lockdown, while noting that its preparation, timing and communication left much to be desired. The PM was decisive when a hard call had to be taken. Indecision or further delay could have landed us in a worse state than we are. In retrospect, we now know that our response was already delayed, but it would be unfair to indict the government on that basis. Global knowledge and awareness at that time did not warrant such a response. On balance, we reacted faster than most other countries.

It would also be unfair to blame the Modi government for all the mess that we face today. A largely unanticipated pandemic is bound to create havoc, even in the best of places. It is bound to be worse in a country like India, given the weak public health fundamentals and fragile response systems. An indictment of the Modi government must be careful about limiting itself to what could have been anticipated, what could have been achieved in our conditions. And it must leave room for genuine mistakes. Faced with a crisis of this kind, the best of leaders with the purest intentions will make erroneous calls. They must be criticised, but not indicted for bona fide errors of judgement.

Sadly, even after making all these allowances, it is hard to escape the conclusion that Narendra Modi government has failed India in its hour of need. The government has been clueless about controlling the health crisis, incompetent in handling its economic consequence and insensitive in dealing with the humanitarian crisis.

Also read: The surveys can’t be true: Modi’s popularity has taken a beating with migrant crisis

A failing health model

Let us begin with the health crisis. We must not blame PM Modi for his early decisions in pandemic management. We cannot indict him for erring on the side of caution because he heard (as all global leaders did) conflicting forecasts about the progress of the pandemic. But we must ask some questions nevertheless: why did the government not listen to alternative voices about more testing at an early stage? Why did the PM not try to learn from and replicate the Kerala model? Did he allow political envy to trump national interest? Why did he not come down heavily against his supporters trying to communalise the pandemic? Once it became clear that the lockdown was not ‘breaking the chain’ or flattening the curve, why did he persist with the lockdown as the sole remedy? Did he allow his ego and self-image to trump rational course correction? And finally, why is no senior functionary (not even a minister, let alone the head of the government, as is the norm in many countries) responding to the media’s questions on the pandemic? What is the future strategy? Is there something that the government wishes to hide?

All these questions do not admit of easy answers and leave the country with the impression of a government that is lost but does not know how to admit it or ask for help.

Also read: White-collar, blue-collar, no-collar: Discovery of a working class Modi’s India forgot

Misplaced economic priorities

On the economic front, let us allow for the fiscal constraints that the government faces at this moment, even though it is largely responsible for this situation due to untimely waiver to corporates and inflation of revenue projections. Still, we must ask why has the Modi government not done anything to stimulate demand (despite pleas from every economist who matters)? Why the continuous pumping of liquidity despite the fact that banks have failed to use the extra liquidity made available in March? Why has the government not addressed what the industrialists, businessmen, farmers and labourers were actually asking for? Why has the government made no attempt to raise additional revenue (despite many sensible suggestions) to meet this crisis? Why use this crisis to push through a number of policy changes on labour law, agriculture, environment and investment that have nothing to do with the cause or solution to the current crisis? And, why not share the real economic situation with the country? Why dress up the “packages”, that too in such amateurish ways, so as to somehow match the magical 20-lakh crore figure?

These questions lead us to a sad answer: the economic response of the fifth-largest economy facing its worst recession and joblessness is being shaped by a bunch of too-clever-by-half economists and packaged by an ignorant and arrogant political leadership. More than saving the economy, the leaders are focused on saving themselves and their wealthy friends.

Also read: Direct cash transfer best way to help poor in Covid crisis. If Modi govt can’t do it, let us

Humanitarian crisis

Finally, let’s turn to the Modi government’s handling of the humanitarian crisis made visible by the migrant workers who have taken to the streets. Again, let us grant that given our size and deep inequalities, some degree of distress was inevitable. But we must ask: Did the government even try to anticipate this distress and plan to alleviate it when announcing the lockdown? Why was the government surprised by the scale of the problem of the migrants (eight crore, as Sitharaman admitted in her press conference)?

Why were there no special arrangements for food and income of the stranded workers for the first 50 days of the lockdown? What else did the government expect jobless, food-less and hopeless workers to do, except walk back? Why do we not get a report of this kind from any other country in the world, even African countries much poorer than us? And once the government discovered, within the first week of the lockdown, the plight of the migrant workers, what did it do to address the crisis, except law and order advisories?

Why was the decision to start Shramik trains delayed so much and taken when it was actually riskier? Why the insistence on the fares for distress evacuation? Why did it take the Ministry of Home Affairs six weeks to issue a simple advisory about humanitarian support to the migrants on the road?

Insensitive would be too mild a word to characterise this shameful handling of the worst national-level humanitarian crisis. To call the Modi government heartless displays credulity. As India goes for a free fall, the top political functionaries are focused on political intrigue, blame-game and public relations. India’s worst health, economic and humanitarian crisis is being handled by undoubtedly the most callous and perhaps the most incompetent government.



 

citymonk

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Narendra Modi govt has failed India in its hour of need — both economy and people

As India goes for a free fall due to Covid and lockdown, insensitive would be too mild a word to characterise Modi government’s shameful handling of the crisis.
It seems you have lot of prejudice against our twice elected National leader. Having diffrence of opinion on his government's actions is part of democratic process. But, who is Yogendra Yadav to pass such verdict on his various acts.

You too are not leaving any stone left unturned to highlight Migrant Labour crisis on all forums on regular basis but if at all there would have been any real crisis then would Labour Politirate have kept quite for so long and remained submissive instead of staging big Revolt against the Yadav's projected incompetent Government.
Since there is no revolt hence there is no incompetence on part of government as Mr. Yadav is depicting.
 
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adsatinder

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It seems you have lot of prejudice against our twice elected National leader. Having diffrence of opinion on his government's actions is part of democratic process. But, who is Yogendra Yadav to pass such verdict on his various acts.

You too are not leaving any stone left unturned to highlight Migrant Labour crisis on all forums on regular basis but if at all there would have been any real crisis then would Labour Politirate have kept quite for so long and remained submissive instead of staging big Revolt against the Yadav's projected incompetent Government.
Since there is no revolt hence there is no incompetence on part of government as Mr. Yadav is depicting.
This will be shown in coming any election of state or center for sure.
Labour will vote certaily against the cruelty and partiality against poors.
Rich / Middle class were treated as VIPs and taken on Aeroplanes while poor were left un attended on raod.
This is totally discrimination by powerful people sitting on chairs of Govt.
 

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Basmati rice consignments worth Rs 1700 crore stuck at Iranian ports

Basmati rice consignments worth Rs 1,700 crore are stuck at Iranian ports because of issues with the country's central bank, prompting exporters to seek government help to ensure steady payments from Tehran.


By Madhvi Sally, ET Bureau | Jun 03, 2020, 10.56 AM IST




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Reuters

Basmati rice consignments worth Rs 1,700 crore are stuck at Iranian ports because of issues with the country’s central bank, prompting exporters to seek government help to ensure steady payments from Tehran. Exporters said the Iranian central bank was not issuing currency allocations to local rice buyers, leading to delays in unloading. Iran is the largest importer of Indian basmati rice, buying around 34% of the rice variety shipped out of India

“Over 2.5 lakh tonne of basmati rice valued at Rs 1,700 crore is held up in the Iranian ports since the past few months,” said Vinod Kaul, executive director of All India Rice Exporters Association. “We have requested the Indian government intervention in evolving a safe payment mechanism for Iran to resolve the current situation and prevent any future recurrence.”

Exporters said there was no clarity. “We have not got our money since past two to three months. Now, we hear that consignment lying in Bandar Abbas port in Iran will be cleared and we will get our money, but things are not clear till date,” said Jai Kumar Gupta, CEO at Supple Tek Industries, which exports rice to Iran. A Karnal-based exporter said that some exporters were facing the problem of remittances coming from Iran for consignments shipped in the last five months.

Gupta said exports should be allowed only against advance payment or a letter of credit. Satish Goel of Shree Jagdamba Agrico Exports said UCO Bank and IDBI bank would have Rs 5,000-6,000 crore in their rupee accounts, which has especially been created to facilitate the India-Iran trade settlement, so there needs to be another payment mechanism. “We are currently not taking any new order as we are worried about getting timely payment. The situation may improve by the third quarter, if the governments intervene,” said Goel.




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Not infection but GDP: India has flattened the wrong curve, says Rajiv Bajaj

Speaking to senior Congress leader Rahul Gandhi, top industrialist Rajiv Bajaj said India has flattened the wrong curve and now faces a stiff challenge in restoring the economy.


India Today Web Desk
India Today Web Desk
New Delhi
June 4, 2020
UPDATED: June 4, 2020 11:37 IST




Bajaj Auto MD Rajiv Bajaj. (Photo: Reuters)

At a time when several questions have being raised about India’s prolonged lockdown, Bajaj Auto MD Rajiv Bajaj said India has flattened the wrong curve, not coronavirus but GDP.
Bajaj, who had been expressing dissent against the prolonged strict lockdown in India, said, “I think unfortunately India not only looked West it went to the wild West, we stayed more towards the impervious side. We tried to implement a hard lockdown but it was still porous. We have ended up with the worst of both worlds.”
Bajaj criticised the fact that India followed the western countries like the US, Spain and Italy instead of countries like Japan, who have managed to find a balance in the fight against coronavirus.


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Speaking to senior Congress leader Rahul Gandhi, Bajaj said, “On the one hand, the porous lockdown makes sure that the virus will still exist.”
“So, you have not solved that problem, but you have decimated the economy, you flattened the wrong curve. It is not the infection curve, it is the GDP curve.”
He also called the lockdown a “bitter-sweet” experience and it has favoured only those who can “afford” the economic difficulties caused by the prolonged lockdown.
“When you see what’s happening around you, it is certainly more bitter than sweet,” he said and added that India’s lockdown has been draconian in nature.
Bajaj also criticised the government for failing to disclose facts, logic and truth. He added that it has trigger “enormous” fear in people and it would be difficult to change the mindset now.

“People still think infection means death, it is a herculean task to open up. To get this fear out of the mind of people there has to be a clear narrative from PM because when he says something people seem to follow,” Bajaj explained.
In an earlier interview, Rajiv Bajaj told India Today TV News Director Rahul Kanwal that India’s Covid-19 relief package lacked the “wow factor” in comparison to measures announced by western nations.
Bajaj also criticised the government for not helping people who have lost their jobs during the lockdown.
“Not just the migrants but even the others who have been displaced. I have read that 12 crore people have lost their jobs. That’s a huge number,” Bajaj said.
He also expressed dissatisfaction over the fact that big businesses have not spoken enough about the inadequacies of India’s relief package.
“I am not very happy about the fact that big businesses are not speaking up. They are not conveying their view, as we should in a free country about what we think is amiss and what needs to be done,” he said.
“Maybe they do not deserve a stimulus,” he added.


Not infection but GDP: India has flattened the wrong curve, says Rajiv Bajaj
 
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