Can we carry a drone on a Domestic flight in India

Vijay09

VJ Kumar
Hi All,
Has anyone lately carried a drone through domestic airport . Were there any issues you faced and how did you carry it through ? I want to carry dji tello to LEH from Delhi and back. Please share your experience
 

rameshtahlan

Super User
There is no problem of carrying a Drone on Domestic Flights.
It needs to be in Check in baggage,
however, the batt need to be hand carried in Cabin baggage,

The problem is not about carrying the Drone,
the problem is that there is a BAN by DGCA for flying it.
If you get caught flying it, rest assured, the stuff will be confiscated, and also an FIR will be registered.
The fact that your name will appear in an FIR can create problems for you in the future in case of migration or certain job that you may apply for where the organisation will verify your credentials and police records.

Also to avoid being called away at time of boarding,
you must declare the Drone at the Check in counter and that you wish to get it clears by Security. Otherwise when the baggage goes through scanner, you may be called to open the baggage.

Happy Landings.
 

Vijay09

VJ Kumar
T
There is no problem of carrying a Drone on Domestic Flights.
It needs to be in Check in baggage,
however, the batt need to be hand carried in Cabin baggage,

The problem is not about carrying the Drone,
the problem is that there is a BAN by DGCA for flying it.
If you get caught flying it, rest assured, the stuff will be confiscated, and also an FIR will be registered.
The fact that your name will appear in an FIR can create problems for you in the future in case of migration or certain job that you may apply for where the organisation will verify your credentials and police records.

Also to avoid being called away at time of boarding,
you must declare the Drone at the Check in counter and that you wish to get it clears by Security. Otherwise when the baggage goes through scanner, you may be called to open the baggage.

Happy Landings.
Thanks for the detailed information Sir
 

rameshtahlan

Super User
Whole of Ladakh region is security sensitive and even then we see so many drone shots all over Youtube. Even the airport itself has been thoroughly photographed/videographed. These bans are only on paper..
You may feel it is on paper,
meet the guys who got caught.
not just Ladakh,
24 guys have got caught in Spiti Valley,
and in Spiti Valley, the police has inform all villages etc that if they see any one flying a Drone they should call the police control room.
So take your chance.
it is your life.

happy landings.
 

Yogesh Sarkar

Administrator
People do many illegal things in India and usually get away with it. I have even seen people flying drones at Pangong Tso, near bridges and even army installations in Ladakh. They mostly get away, some do not and then they learn a harsh lesson in bureaucracy in India.
 

adsatinder

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Some Old News had Arrest News:

Indian drone sales rise along with arrests, as confusion clouds descend

  • A huge aerial photography sector is thriving in the ambiguity as civil aviation regulator DGCA is yet to issue a notification
  • The agency banned the use of drones for commercial purposes in October 2014
  • But the final policy is yet to see daylight
  • See more news from India at www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome
By SHASHANK SHEKHAR

PUBLISHED: 23:42 GMT, 26 January 2017 | UPDATED: 00:50 GMT, 27 January 2017


Drones are taking off in India, but buyers are often unaware of the legal turbulence that may lie ahead.

While sales are going through the roof, prior permission from authorities is necessary to fly them.

Delhi Police this month detained three foreigners in southwest Delhi's Dwarka area for operating a drone from their terrace.


A huge aerial photography sector is thriving in the ambiguity as civil aviation regulator DGCA is yet to issue a notification

Four people were arrested in Varanasi for filming Ganga aarti through drone cameras at the Dashashwamedha Ghat without permission in 2014.

A huge aerial photography sector is thriving in the ambiguity as civil aviation regulator DGCA is yet to issue a notification on the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for civilian purposes.

The agency banned the use of drones for commercial purposes in October 2014.
It came out with a draft policy for operations of drones in April 2016, which brought some cheer for the industry.



The agency banned the use of drones for commercial purposes in October 2014

But the final policy is yet to see daylight. Usage of drones came under the scanner due to security concerns as officials pointed out that the vehicles can be used to carry out aerial attacks and pose a great threat if not regulated.

As the demand for high-powered drones has gone up manifold, it has given rise to a grey market openly selling these gizmos at a premium price.

Bollywood films, high-end weddings and large concerts are often shot using drones to get an eagle-eye view and capture the scale.



Delhi Police this month detained three foreigners in southwest Delhi's Dwarka area for operating a drone from their terrace (file pic)

'One cannot import a drone as customs department will not clear it. Only those having permission on government letterheads get approval.

'In India there is no ban on sale of drones but there is restriction on usage. In this situation only the grey market is growing and bribery at police stations and customs for clearance has increased,' said John Livingstone, president of the Consortium of Unmanned Vehicle Systems India.

According to experts, the draft DGCA policy is in sync with best international practices followed in Australia, Netherlands, the US and Canada. Under this, not only would a person have to get his gadget registered but will also need a training certificate before flying it.

Making the usage legal for civilians will open doors for aerial surveys, commercial photography, aerial mapping, wedding shoots, recording concerts and events.

Even the public sector sees a huge potential for drones since in the last eight months as many as 36 tenders were floated by government agencies.

'Ever since drones came into photography, it has changed the entire dimension of it. It has opened up an entire new vertical in the photo industry.

'But with the ambiguity about permission, no photographer is ready to use their expensive drones,' said Shourrya Sachdeva of Aerial Indians, an organisation specialising in drone photography.



Bollywood films, high-end weddings and large concerts are often shot using drones to get an eagle-eye view and capture the scale

Many lensmen have landed up at police stations with onlookers calling the cops about 'flying objects'.

Due to lack of provisions to book the operators, authorities only seize the drones.

Experts say drone enthusiasts can pick one up online or from the nearest electronics market, but they should not fly it on the terrace, or in the neighbourhood, or even in the city.

Take it to the outskirts and remember to fly as low as possible.

Wedding photographers are using two types of drones, which are easily available in the market.

These include small four-armed quad-copters, which can lift lightweight cameras like the GoPro and other action cameras.

Larger six to eight-armed drones can carry high resolution DSLR, which are best for large outdoor venues.

An advanced drone comes with a price tag of Rs 75,000 - 2 lakh, while small ones are available for Rs 20,000-50,000.


Most wedding photographers get them on rent, for Rs 7,000 -15,000.

Even as flying of drones is banned, there are no rules or policies in place to ensure that they are operated safely.

Anyone who's 18 or older can buy one and use it, without any training on piloting them safely. Such drones are available at leading online shopping sites and in electronic markets of Delhi like Nehru Place, Palika Bazar, Gaffar Market and Karol Bagh.


Indian drone sales rise along with arrests amid confusion | Daily Mail Online
 
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