Corona Virus Covid 19

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Team any travel pass for Covid required for Travelling to Jammu?
Yes.


Negative Covid report to carry which should be not more that 48 hours old, Rapid test at borders before you are allowed to enter in Jammu State.

You will be stopped at Lakhanpur Border.


Corona Rapid Test will be done and couple of hours will take for formalities.
You can roam easily after that.
 
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J&K introduces rapid antigen COVID-19 tests for screening of travellers

DNA Web Team | Updated: Aug 9, 2020, 09:11 AM IST



These tests are useful as results come out within half an hour using this method.

Jammu and Kashmir administration has introduced rapid antigen tests to pick out COVID-19 infections among people entering the union Territory at Lakhanpur in Kathua.

These tests are useful as results come out within half an hour using this method.

"We were using RT-PCR method earlier but recently the administration introduced rapid antigen test. We get the results in about half an hour using this method," Chief Medical Officer (CMO) Ashok Choudhary told ANI on Saturday.

"We have conducted 1,230 tests so far, of which 10 were positive. Using the rapid antigen test, we can test 700 samples daily. This method has also reduced the load on quarantine centres," Chief Minister's office said.

The total number of cases in the Union Territory (UT) now stands at 24,390 including 7,264 active cases and 459 deaths, as per the administration of Jammu and Kashmir.

The Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare on Saturday stated that India's COVID-19 recovery rate stands at 68.32%.

India`s patients recovering from COVID-19 crossed the 14.2 lakh mark.

The Ministry further stated that the case fatality rate (CFR) in the country stands at 2.04 percent.


 

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The 6-foot social-distancing rule is based on nearly 80-year-old science. Scientists at MIT and Oxford have created a traffic-light system to use instead.
Hilary Brueck
Aug 25, 2020, 6:35 PM


social distancing


Academics in the reading rooms at the Bodleian Libraries on Tuesday in Oxford, England. After closing in mid-March because of the coronavirus pandemic, the world-famous libraries have partially opened for students and academics with strict social-distancing measures. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
  • The 6-foot rule for social distancing is based on science that's 80 years old.
  • Researchers say it's an antiquated way to think about how viruses move through the air.
  • Instead, we should be considering many facets of an interaction: where it takes place, how long it lasts, and whether it's going to be loud.
  • A new tool out from researchers at Oxford and MIT provides a traffic-light system for assessing risks during the pandemic so we don't always have to be on high alert.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.


In the late 1800s, the German scientist Carl Flügge had a hunch: Maybe if you maintain enough physical distance between people who are sick and those who are well, you can prevent the spread of pathogens from person to person.

At the time, it was just a hypothesis, one that scientists like him often tried to test out using glass plates.

But it would take another four decades for technology to advance enough to confirm the idea, with the advent of high-speed photography.

In the early 1940s, scientists finally got their first glimpses of people's sneezes hurtling through the air in real time, at a capture rate of 30,000 frames a second, confirming that indeed, most of the stuff we throw into the air when we sneeze, cough, or yell tends to settle down to the ground within about a wingspan or so (say, 3 to 6 feet).


Here is one of those (revolting) first images:



one of the first sneeze pictures


This photo of a sneezer caught in the act was taken by the professor Marshall Jennison from MIT and published in a 1941 research paper. Bettmann/Getty Images


When 'the dogma was born'
Back then, scientists maintained that most of the infectious gunk people expel (say, about 90% of their pathogens) travel less than 6 feet away.

Their study measurements were never meant to be taken as hard-and-fast rules about how far we should stand from other people during a pandemic, though.

Nevertheless, these 3-to-6-feet rules of thumb have become easy-to-follow protocols for keeping potentially sick people at arm's length during the coronavirus outbreak.



"The dogma was born," the professor Lidia Morawska, a leading aerosol scientist in Australia, said of the 80-year-old 6-foot rule. "Like any dogma, it's extremely difficult to change people's minds and change the dogmas."

But as the coronavirus pandemic drags on for months on end, Morawska and other leading air and virus scientists and engineers are starting to lead a charge toward dismantling the old 6-foot rule and taking a more nuanced approach to managing the novel coronavirus' spread.

Instead of always being on super-high alert, or assuming that a distance of 6 feet (or wearing masks, or washing hands) keeps us 100% safe all the time, they say, we should be learning how better to assess the situations we're in every day, letting our guard down now and again when it's relatively safe and moving back onto high alert when it's appropriate.

Can we start thinking differently?
On Tuesday, hoping to inject a little more of such empowerment into the ways people protect themselves from the virus' spread, researchers from Oxford and MIT released a new traffic-light system that they hope will help people live life to its fullest while still being careful enough during the pandemic.



BMJ coronavirus decision making chart


This is the chart that Lydia Bourouiba and her co-authors designed to help people make better decisions about where it's safe to let your guard down, during the pandemic. The BMJ


"With knowledge and tools that are relatively simple to use, that distill complex information, our hope is that decision makers, local community leaders, school leaders, and everybody that is organizing anything like a barbecue or party or a wedding, is empowered to be more resilient, by having the tools to make the right decisions and to impose the right restrictions," Lydia Bourouiba, an MIT professor who directs the university's Fluid Dynamics of Disease Transmission Lab, told Business Insider, shortly before her new tool was released in the BMJ.


"We equip people with understanding to adapt in various situations so that they know when they need to be absolutely vigilant, and when they can let their guard down," she said.

The most important things to keep in mind when assessing the riskiness of any situation include taking a look at the environment you're in and acknowledging the density of the crowd and the activities people are doing.

The coronavirus doesn't follow hard-and-fast rules about infection, and neither should you


pool noodles germany


Café & Konditorei Rothe


Environmental scientists like Morawska say when it comes to talking about how the coronavirus spreads, there's no point in trying to distinguish a droplet from an aerosol or distinguish what happens at 3 feet away versus 10. What matters most is how much virus has a chance to get into your body, regardless of how it gets there.

"There are three modes of transmission, and all three modes of transmission have to be controlled," she said.


Those three modes are people (the most common source of infection), surfaces, and the air.

"These things happen at the same time, and therefore distinguishing what's what is very difficult," Morawska said.

Life is more dangerous, then, in places where people become animated, excited, or otherwise loud in close confines, with stale air.

"Breathing out, singing, coughing, and sneezing generate warm, moist, high-momentum gas clouds of exhaled air containing respiratory droplets," Bourouiba and her coauthors wrote in the BMJ.

In such instances, a distance of even 20 to 30 feet may not be enough to protect you from an infection.
Meatpacking plants are then understandably ripe for viral spread because "the combination of high levels of worker contagion, poor ventilation, cramped working conditions, background noise (which leads to shouting), and low compliance with mask wearing" all contribute to viral spread, Bourouiba and her coauthors noted.
The same issue pops up easily in bars, gyms, indoor music venues, churches, and clubs.


We need to be able to adapt to environments with different levels of vigilance so we're not constantly on max alert

coronavirus risk infographic


A different risk chart, similar to the one that Bourouiba and her coauthors invented for the BMJ, which weighs the relative risks of different activities during the pandemic, based on various criteria. Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel - University of Pennsylvania, Dr. James Phillips - George Washington University, Saskia Popescu - University of Arizona/George Mason University

Engineers, virologists, and environmental scientists all stress that learning how to live with the virus can be done.

"I think everybody understands what traffic lights are in the general public," Bourouiba said.
She says it's important to have such guides in mind as we weigh how to reopen, gather, and socialize during the pandemic, keeping our environment, and our behaviors in it, top of mind.
"We need to be able to adapt so that we are not constantly at max alert," she said. "Not just the 6-foot rule or the mask on its own," she added.
The simple questions to ask include: How long is the contact? Are people wearing face masks? Is the setting well-ventilated? And will it be quiet or loud?

"It's not rocket science to work out what needs to be done to minimize the risk of infection transmission," Morawska said.



www.businessinsider.com/6-foot-distancing-rule-is-outdated-oxford-mit-new-system-2020-8%3famp
 
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दिल्‍ली में मास्‍क न पहनने पर 1.88 लाख लोगों का कटा चालान, वसूले गए 9.42 करोड़ रुपये

दिल्‍ली में मास्‍क न पहनने पर 1.88 लाख लोगों का कटा चालान, वसूले गए 9.42 करोड़ रुपये


दिल्‍ली में मास्‍क न पहनने वालों के कटे चालान. (प्रतीकात्‍मक फोटो AP)


Coronavirus: दिल्‍ली सरकार (Delhi) की ओर से मास्‍क न पहनने वालों का 500 रुपये के चालान का नियम बनाया गया था. इसके बावजूद लोग लापरवाही दिखा रहे हैं.

NEWS18HINDI
LAST UPDATED: AUGUST 27, 2020, 9:43 AM IST

नई दिल्‍ली. देश-दुनिया में कहर बरपा रहे कोरोना वायरस संक्रमण (Coronavirus) निपटने के लिए विशेषज्ञ बार-बार सावधानी बरतने की सलाह देते हैं. इनमें घर से बाहर निकलते समय फेस मास्‍क पहनना, हाथों को बार-बार धोना और सोशल डिस्‍टेंसिंग का पालन करना शामिल है. इसके बावजूद दिल्‍ली समेत कुछ शहरों में लोग इन नियमों का पालन नहीं कर रहे हैं. इस बीच दिल्‍ली (Delhi Coronavirus) में भी लोगों की ओर से बड़ी संख्‍या में नियमों का पालन नहीं करने की बात सामने आई है.

इसके तहत दिल्‍ली में 14 जून से अब तक सार्वजनिक स्‍थलों पर मास्‍क (Face Mask) न पहनने की वजह से 1,88,578 लोगों का चालान दिल्‍ली पुलिस ने काटा है. इनसे व अन्‍य नियमों के उल्‍लंघन के मामलों को मिलाकर अब तक 9.52 करोड़ रुपये लोगों से वसूले जा चुके हैं. वहीं बुधवार को दिल्‍ली के मुख्‍यमंत्री अरविंद केजरीवाल ने प्रेस कॉन्‍फ्रेंस करके कहा कि एक हफ्ते के भीतर हर दिन कोविड-19 की जांच दोगुनी बढ़ाकर 40,000 कर दी जाएगी क्योंकि शहर में कोरोना वायरस के मामलों में मामूली बढ़ोतरी देखी गई है.

मुख्यमंत्री ने कहा कि सरकार ने कोविड-19 दिशा-निर्देशों के सख्त पालन के लिए निर्देश जारी किए हैं. साथ ही कहा कि सार्वजनिक स्थलों पर हर किसी को मास्क पहनना होगा और शारीरिक दूरी का ध्यान रखना होगा. हिंदुस्‍तान टाइम्‍स की रिपोर्ट के अनुसार जून में दिल्‍ली सरकार की ओर से मास्‍क न पहनने वालों का 500 रुपये के चालान का नियम बनाया गया था. इसे दिल्‍ली एपिडेमिक डिसीजेज (मैनेजमेंट ऑफ कोविड 19) रेगुलेशंस 2020 के तहत दिल्‍ली के उप राज्‍यपाल ने भी मंजूरी दी थी. इसका मकसद लोगों को मास्‍क पहनने के लिए बाध्‍य करना था.

आंकड़ों के अनुसार दिल्‍ली में सबसे कम चालान नई दिल्‍ली में हुए हैं. इनकी संख्‍या 6482 है. वहीं सबसे अधिक 22136 चालान बाहरी दिल्‍ली में हुए हैं. इनमें मंगोलपुरी, अमन विहार, सुल्‍तानपुरी जैसे इलाके हैं. पश्चिमी दिल्‍ली में 16772 चालान हुए.
एक पुलिस अफसर के मुताबिक दिल्‍ली में जिन लोगों के चालान हुए हैं, उनमें बड़ी संख्‍या वाले वो लोग हैं जो मास्‍क का खर्च उठा सकते हैं. इसके बावजूद वे सार्वजनिक जगहों पर बिना मास्‍क के निकल जाते हैं. उनका कहना है कि इन लोगों के पास मास्‍क ना पहनने का कोई कारण नहीं होता है. लोगों पर जुर्माना लगाना कोई उपाय नहीं है, हां ये एक विकल्‍प है. उनका कहना है कि वे लोग ऐसे व्‍यक्ति का चालान नहीं काटते हैं जो उसका खर्च नहीं उठा सकता. जबकि वे लोग ऐसे लोगों को मास्‍क उपलब्‍ध कराते हैं.



दिल्‍ली में मास्‍क न पहनने पर 1.88 लाख लोगों का कटा चालान, वसूले गए 9.42 करोड़ रुपये
 

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Unlock 4.0 from Sept 1: Metro may start, schools likely to remain shut

Unlock 4 will come at a time when India’s infection tally has ballooned to more than 3 million and over 58,000 people have died due to the coronavirus disease (Covid-19).

INDIA Updated: Aug 25, 2020 14:36 IST

hindustantimes.com | Edited by Meenakshi Ray

hindustantimes.com | Edited by Meenakshi Ray
Hindustan Times, New Delhi

A man photographs Delhi Metro trains parked at Khyber Pass Metro Depot in New Delhi in this file photo. Metro services along with bars are likely to be allowed to resume from September 1.


A man photographs Delhi Metro trains parked at Khyber Pass Metro Depot in New Delhi in this file photo. Metro services along with bars are likely to be allowed to resume from September 1. (Ajay Aggarwal /HT Photo)

Unlock 4, the ongoing process to open up economic activities in India, will start from September 1.
Unlock 4 will come at a time when India’s infection tally has ballooned to more than 3 million and over 58,000 people have died due to the coronavirus disease (Covid-19).
Here is a look at what will open and what will remain shut:
* The Centre is finally likely to allow resumption of Metro services, which has been shut since March 22, from September 1. Officials have said modifications are still being worked out in consultation with ministry of housing and urban affairs, local governments, Metro rail corporations and security agencies.

* The Unlock 4 guidelines for resuming Metro service will be issued later this week.
* Passengers travelling in Metro trains may not be allowed to use tokens anymore as Centre plans to implement a contactless ticketing system using only cards.
* Bars might also be allowed to sell liquor over the counter for takeaway services. They were also closed since on March 25 when the lockdown came into effect.

* Schools and colleges will continue to remain closed but the government is considering reopening institutes like IITs and IIMs.
* Cinema halls and auditoriums will also continue to remain closed for another month. Officials have said that even if cinema halls are allowed right now, it won’t be financially viable for them to run shows with only 25-30% capacity due to physical distancing norms.
* Social, political, sports, entertainment, academic, cultural, religious functions and other large congregations are also likely to remain prohibited till next month.

* Officials have said Unlock 4 guidelines will only mention the activities which will be prohibited while the rest can resume. The containment zones will continue to be under strict lockdown and monitoring.


Unlock 4.0 from Sept 1: Metro may start, schools likely to remain shut
 

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Japanese researchers say ozone effective in neutralising Covid-19

Scientists at Fujita Health University told a news conference they had proven that ozone gas in concentrations of 0.05 to 0.1 parts per million (ppm), levels considered harmless to humans, could kill the virus.

SCIENCE Updated: Aug 27, 2020 10:14 IST
Reuters| Posted by: Harshit Sabarwal

Reuters| Posted by: Harshit Sabarwal

Tokyo

A recent study at the Georgia Institute of Technology showed that ozone may be effective in disinfecting gowns, goggles and other medical protective equipment.


A recent study at the Georgia Institute of Technology showed that ozone may be effective in disinfecting gowns, goggles and other medical protective equipment.(Parveen Kumar/HT file photo. Representative image)


Japanese researchers said on Wednesday that low concentrations of ozone can neutralise coronavirus particles, potentially providing a way for hospitals to disinfect examination rooms and waiting areas.
Scientists at Fujita Health University told a news conference they had proven that ozone gas in concentrations of 0.05 to 0.1 parts per million (ppm), levels considered harmless to humans, could kill the virus.
The experiment used an ozone generator in a sealed chamber with a sample of coronavirus. The potency of the virus declined by more than 90% when subjected to low level ozone for 10 hours.
“Transmission of the novel coronavirus may be reduced by continuous, low-concentration ozone treatment, even in environments where people are present, using this kind of system,” said lead researcher Takayuki Murata.

“We found it to be particularly effective in high-humidity conditions.”

Ozone, a type of oxygen molecule, is known to inactivate many pathogens, and previously experiments have shown that high concentrations, between 1-6 ppm, were effective against the coronavirus but potentially toxic to humans.

A recent study at the Georgia Institute of Technology showed that ozone may be effective in disinfecting gowns, goggles and other medical protective equipment.
Fujita Medical University Hospital, in Aichi prefecture central Japan, has installed ozone generators to reduce infection in waiting areas and patient rooms.
The university has also performed a clinical trial of Fujifilm Holdings Corp’s Avigan drug on Covid-19 patients.


Japanese researchers say ozone effective in neutralising Covid-19
 

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Himachal Pradesh has started new guidelines for tourists.



Open Entry For Tourists In Himachal
नए नियमों के साथ हिमाचल में सैलानियों के लिए खुली एंट्री, दिखानी होगी कोरोना नेगेटिव रिपोर्ट
अमर उजाला ब्यूरो Updated Fri, 28 Aug 2020 12:24 AM IST



1598562853487.png


फोटो : Yamuna Nagar

हिमाचल सरकार ने नए नियमों के साथ सैलानियों की एंट्री खोल दी है। पर्यटन विभाग ने नये नियमों को जोड़ते हुए एसओपी जारी कर दी है। इसका सबसे ज्यादा फायदा यमुनानगर के लोगों को मिलेगी। क्योंकि जिले की लंबी सीमा सिरमौर जिले से लगी हुई है और दोनों तरफ रिश्तेदारियां हैं। लोगों को अपनी रिश्तेदारियों में जाने के लिए भी क्वारंटीन होना पड़ रहा था। अब केवल नेगेटिव रिपोर्ट दिखानी जरूरी होगी और अन्य सख्त नियमों में भी ढील दी गई है। जिसमें सबसे बड़ी पांच दिन के रहने के नियम को कम करके दो दिन किया गया है। पर्यटन निदेशक देवेश कुमार की ओर से जारी एसओपी में स्पष्ट किया है कि अगर कोई होटल आने पर कोरोना पॉजिटिव पाया जाता है तो जिस कमरे में वो रह रहा था, उसे 24 घंटे के लिए सील कर दिया जाएगा। जिन क्षेत्रों में ऐसा सैलानी 48 घंटे पहले घूमा हैं। वहां भी सैनिटाइजेशन करनी होगी। वहीं नेगेटिव रिपोर्ट भी 72 घंटे की बजाय 96 घंटे की भी मान्य कर दी गई है। वहीं दस साल से छोटे बच्चों की रिपोर्ट भी अनिवार्य नहीं होगी। हालांकि कोविड हाई लोड सिटी से आने वालों को चिह्नित करने के लिए पंजीकरण की व्यवस्था जारी रखी गई है। पंजीकरण के लिए डीसी के पास किए गए आवेदन को मंजूर होने का इंतजार नहीं करना पड़ेगा। अगर कोई व्यक्ति बिना पंजीकरण आना चाहता है तो उसका पंजीकरण सीमा पर तैनात जिला प्रशासन के अधिकारी और कर्मचारी मौके पर करेंगे। अब टैक्सी या निजी गाड़ी के चालक भी क्वारंटीन नहीं होंगे।

हालांकि हिमाचल सरकार ने राज्य में प्रवेश प्रक्रिया को कुछ सरल कर दिया है। लेकिन सख्ती अभी भी बरकरार है। पूरी जांच पड़ताल के बाद ही हिमाचल में प्रवेश दिया जा रहा है। बिना पंजीकरण और कोविड रिपोर्ट के आने वालों को प्रवेश नहीं दिया जा रहा। कालाअंब और पांवटा साहिब बॉर्डर से वीरवार को दर्जनों वाहन वापस हरियाणा की तरफ भेजे गए। सुबह 9 बजे से दोपहर 3 बजे तक पांवटा के बहराल बैरियरों पर नाममात्र के पर्यटकों ने भी प्रवेश नहीं किया। इनमें से अधिकतर ऐसे वाहन थे, जिनमें केवल गुरुद्वारा साहिब के बाहर शीश नवाने के लिए लोग जा रहे थे। वीरवार को करीब तीन घंटे की अवधि के दौरान गोविंदघाट बैरियर पर एक भी सैलानियों का वाहन नहीं पहुंचा। केवल 2 वाहन ऐसे पहुंचे, जो मुख्य गुरुद्वारा साहिब में शीश नवाना चाहते थे। एक वाहन में 4 व एक में 3 श्रद्धालु सवार थे। इन्होंने ई पास दिखाया। उधर, कालाअंब बैरियर पर भी खास चहल-कदमी देखने को नहीं मिली। बैरियर पर उत्तराखंड की ओर जाने वाले वाहनों को जाने दिया गया। जबकि कई लोग बिना पंजीकरण के पहुंचे। जिन्हें प्रवेश नहीं मिला।


नए नियमों के साथ हिमाचल में सैलानियों के लिए खुली एंट्री, दिखानी होगी कोरोना नेगेटिव रिपोर्ट
 

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Is COVID-19 airborne?
By SYED FIRDAUS ASHRAF
July 07, 2020 12:51 IST


'Whatever modelling we have, people are saying end of July or beginning of August we will see a peak of COVID-19 in Maharashtra.'
'After which the decline will begin.'




IMAGE: Paramedics check the temperature and pulse rate of residents in Malvani, north west Mumbai. Photograph: ANI Photo


On July 6, an open letter written by 239 global scientists to the World Health Organisation startled the world. It stated that 'there is a real risk that the coronavirus can be airborne, meaning it can spread through microscopic particles that linger in the air.'
The claim in the letter is a significant departure from the WHO's belief so far that COVID-19 is spread primarily by large respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
The letter has created fissures in the scientific community, with many questioning WHO'S efficiency in handling the pandemic, while others assert that the evidence stated in the letter is unconvincing.

The letter has further aggravated the panic among a public already battered by fears about how and where the coronavirus can strike.
Syed Firdaus Ashraf/Rediff.com spoke to Dr Pradip Awate, Maharashtra's disease surveillance officer, who been tracking the pandemic in Mumbai and Maharashtra, the nation's worst affected city and state, to find out what he thinks about this new theory that the virus could be airborne and if he has encountered any evidence of this in his long battle against COVID-19.


200 experts have written to WHO, saying there is evidence that coronavirus is airborne. What is your opinion?
This is not an issue of belief; it's quite a technical issue. We know this virus for the past six months -- from December 2019.
And what we know is that this is a lower respiratory infection and that is why as per the size of the droplet, it is a fomite-borne (surface-borne) infection and not an airborne infection.
Now these scientists are claiming that if the droplet is smaller, it can glide for a certain distance in the air.
It depends on the air flow and all those things, which can add the airborne infection aspect to transmission.
So, this is a very technical issue and it has to be practically proved by different modelling of the transmission.

Does this mean that the droplets remain in the air and are capable of infecting people many hours later?
The size of the droplets matter.
For example, in tuberculosis, the droplets remain in the air and are known to spread.
As of today, with whatever information and knowledge we have regarding COVID-19, it has not been proved, or at least advocated by WHO, that such things can happen.
However, since new things are coming up, they should be judged by scientific methods.

The scientists say that the virus spreads more in crowded places with poor ventilation. In such a scenario, what should be done?
This is true, as we saw this happening in Mumbai and Pune.
This happened specially in slums where the population density is heavy. The same thing happens in influenza too.
Influenza is also a droplet infection and it is but natural that a dense population is more conducive for the transmission of this kind of droplet infection.

Does ultra-violet light help to kill this virus indoors?
As per the information that has been given by the apex bodies -- WHO and Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (in the United States)-- ultra-violet light does not help.

Dr Benedetta Allegranzi, WHO's technical lead of infection prevention and control, said the evidence for the virus spreading by air is unconvincing, there is no solid evidence. Why is WHO taking such a stand?
Sometimes, someone directly coughs or sneezes into your face and at that time if you are too close with that person then I agree, in such times, airborne infection does play a role.
But whatever transmission dynamics we are looking at for COVID-19 in different countries, it has not been proved that the major reason is airborne infection.

These scientists also say that WHO is out of step with science.
That is why we need to have further research and modelling. Only then will we get the answers.
As of now, there are two different schools of thought and they need to substantiate their findings by solid scientific methods.

Mumbai has witnessed more than 100 days of lockdown. What are the key findings in this time for you? How is the virus behaving? Have you come across anything unusual in its behaviour, spread, etc?
There are no unusual things happening.
We are now doing aggressive contact tracing and segregation of patients which has helped in the reduction of numbers. These are our key observations.

What about the symptoms of diarrhoea in COVID-19 patients? Is the virus mutating?
What happens is that the COVID-19 virus has certain virus specific receptors in our body.
Why a particular virus is causing a respiratory problem and why another virus is causing diarrhoea is because those receptors are in particular organs of the human body.
Sometimes you can have diarrhoea, and as of today there are not many cases if you see the percentage of COVID-19 cases, but there are exceptions, where people are suffering from diarrhoea.

After 100 days of lockdown, Mumbai is nowhere near flattening the curve. Why is it so?
Looking at the size of our population, it looks like it will take more time. Only then will the number of cases descend.

When do you see it happening?
Whatever modelling we have, people are saying end of July or beginning of August we will see a peak of COVID-19 in Maharashtra. After which the decline will begin.
But this is also modelling and no modelling is perfect.

India is now the third worst-hit nation.
It is because of the population of our country.
We have surpassed Russia. Russia has only 14 crore (140 million) population which is close to the population of Maharashtra (11.5 crore/115).
India has 10 times more people than Russia and these things matter when you make a statement like India has surpassed Russia.
Moreover, we are doing more and more tests so more cases are coming out.

Only around one crore (10 million) people have been tested in India out of a population of 130 crore (1.3 billion). Should it matter?
Initially, it was only 2,000 COVID-19 tests per million at the national level. Now nearly 6,500 tests per million are happening at the national level.
In Maharashtra it is 7,800 tests per million. There is a four-fold increase in testing.

Do you think only a miracle can save us?
Though the number of cases are in lakhs, one thing is sure -- we are observing that about 75 per cent people suffering are mildly symptomatic or asymptomatic.
Only 15 per cent of the population needs medical help.
And only 5 per cent require ICU and 1.5 to 2 percent of COVID-19 patients need ventilators.


This is definitely a public health crisis, but at the same time, the recovery of patients is very good in Mumbai city and even in Maharashtra state. And recovery too is faster.


Is COVID-19 airborne?
 
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