Corona Virus Covid 19

Big Daddy

Super User
Most breakfast restaurants in the US and Canada serve orange juice. Usually, the option is either coffee or orange juice. I think Indians should start doing this too. It is an immunity booster.
 

citymonk

Super User
Most breakfast restaurants in the US and Canada serve orange juice. Usually, the option is either coffee or orange juice. I think Indians should start doing this too. It is
In resorts they are already doing it.
Even before that serving fruits like orange and banana continues to be traditional thing in India.
Instead of Juice eating a Orange or Kinow must be equivalent thing.
 

cat

Senior Billi
uhhh...there is that thing, i forget the name, also called indian gooseberry, very high in vitamin C.....I think it is in that famous tonic too, like Himalayan product. :-k
Extra Vitiamin C always good for helping immune system. I was surprised, something I heard years ago, doctor...in Orissa...Puri, advised big double dose of Vitamin C to help avoid malaria. ...Not to avoid, not to stop it happening, but to avoid serious reaction by the body.

...Amla. ...I have some powder, bought long ago, don't know what to do with it, doesn't seem it would dissolve in water.
 

citymonk

Super User
uhhh...there is that thing, i forget the name, also called indian gooseberry, very high in vitamin C.....I think it is in that famous tonic too, like Himalayan product. :-k
Extra Vitiamin C always good for helping immune system. I was surprised, something I heard years ago, doctor...in Orissa...Puri, advised big double dose of Vitamin C to help avoid malaria. ...Not to avoid, not to stop it happening, but to avoid serious reaction by the body.

...Amla. ...I have some powder, bought long ago, don't know what to do with it, doesn't seem it would dissolve in water.
Amala is name.
It is pure nectar.
 

adsatinder

explorer
Never spoke about vaccinating entire country: Govt

Source: PTI - Edited By: Hemant Waje

Last updated on: December 02, 2020 00:49 IST


The Centre on Tuesday said there may not be a need to vaccinate the country's entire population against COVID-19 if a critical mass of people are given a shot to break the chain of virus transmission, and made it clear it had never spoken about inoculating everyone.




The Centre also asserted that an ''adverse event'' allegedly suffered by a participant in the clinical trial of Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine by the Serum Institute of India will not impact in any manner the timeline for its rollout. Also, it said the initial findings of a probe into the event did not necessitate halting of the trials of the vaccine.
Dr.Reddys Laboratories Ltd. and the Russian Direct Investment Fund, meanwhile, announced commencement of adaptive phase 2/3 clinical trials for COVID-19 vaccine Sputnik V in India after receiving necessary clearance from the Central Drugs Laboratory, Kasauli, in Himachal Pradesh.
As Indian Council of Medical Research Director General Dr. Balram Bhargava spoke at a news briefing about the purpose of the COVID vaccine drive, Union Health Secretary Rajesh Bhushan made it clear there was never a talk about inoculating the whole population of the country with the vaccine.



"I just want to make this clear that the government has never spoken about vaccinating the entire country. It's important that we discuss such scientific issues, based on factual information only and then analyse it," said Bhushan.
Responding to a question, Bhargava said the purpose of the COVID vaccine drive would be to break the chain of virus transmission.
"Our purpose is to break the chain of virus transmission. If we are able to vaccinate a critical mass of people and break the chain of transmission, then we may not have to vaccinate the entire population," he added.
He said the role of masks is also vitally important and that will continue even after the vaccination.
https://www.rediff.com/business/column/covid-19-vaccine-the-need-for-caution/20200720.htm
“Because we are starting with a small group of population at a time and therefore masks will be protective and continue to be used so as to help in breaking the chain of viral transmission.”
The total COVID-19 cases mounted to 94,62,809 with 31,118 new infections, while the death toll climbed to 1,37,621 after 482 more fatalities were reported, according to the Union Health ministry data updated at 8 am. New infections due to COVID-19 have started to decline steadily since the first week of October.
Asked to comment on the alleged adverse event during the SII trial in Chennai, Bhushan said it was being reviewed by the Drugs Controller General of India to ascertain if there is any casual link between the episode and the shot administered to the volunteer.
Last week, a 40-year-old man, who was a volunteer in the third phase of the vaccine trial in Chennai, claimed to have suffered serious neurological and psychological symptoms after taking the experimental shot and has sued the SII along with others and sought compensation of Rs 5 crore, besides seeking a halt to the trial.
The SII has rejected the charge as "malicious and misconceived" and said it will seek damages in excess of Rs 100 crore.
The Pune-based vaccine manufacturer on Tuesday said the vaccine is safe and immunogenic.
"We would want to assure everyone that the vaccine won't be released for mass use unless it is proven immunogenic, and safe," it said in a blogpost.
"The concerned authorities were informed and the principal investigator, DSMB(Data Safety and Monitoring Board) and the Ethics Committee independently cleared and reckoned it as a non-related issue to the vaccine trial.
"Post which, we submitted all the reports and data related to the incident to the DCGI (Drugs Controller General of India). It is only after we cleared all the required processes that we continued with the trials," it added.
The SII said all the requisite regulatory and ethical processes and guidelines were followed diligently and strictly.
Bhushan said due processes about reporting the adverse event have been followed.
“The adverse event will not affect the timelines in any manner, whatsoever."
Union health minister Harsh Vardhan had earlier said a COVID-19 vaccine is likely to be available by the first quarter of 2021.
Bhargava said adverse events do occur with drugs or vaccines or any other health intervention.
"If any adverse event warrants hospitalisation then it is called a serious adverse event. It is the role of the drug regulator, after collating all the data, to ascertain or refute whether there is a causal link between the event and the intervention.
"That casual link, whether it has to be ascertained or refuted, has to be done by the DCGI and all the papers in connection to all five parameters have been submitted to him accordingly for review," he said.
Stating it is done purely on a scientific basis and the assessment is done with a very objectively-based criteria, Bhargava said "initial casuality assessment findings did not necessitate a stoppage of these trials".
Bhushan further stressed that countering disinformation around vaccine was not just the responsibility of the Union and state governments but also of the media and vaccine manufacturers.
He further said the Union Health ministry would shortly come out with a guidance document that will address the issues around vaccine safety.
Bhushan also elaborated on the procedures that are followed in case of an adverse event during a clinical trial.
Whenever a clinical trial starts the subjects are required to sign a prior informed consent form which tells the subject about the possible adverse events that may happen during the trial. Without the signature, a subject cannot participate in a clinical trial, he said citing one such procedure.



Asked if the government has decided on whether those having antibodies or one who have had COVID-19 would be inoculated or not, Bhushan said one of the mandates of the National expert group on Vaccine Administration is also to see whether or not people who are to be vaccinated should be tested for antibodies.
"No final decision has been taken in this regard." However, this issue is being discussed in the scientific community and amongst countries, he added.




Never spoke about vaccinating entire country: Govt
 
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adsatinder

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Pomegranate peel extracts could help fighting COVID-19, research finds
Updated 2020.11.29 20:52 GMT+8





Giulia Carbonaro



A study conducted by researchers at the University of Banja Luka in Bosnia and Herzegovina found that pomegranate peel extracts can play a role in inhibiting coronavirus infection.

"When the World Health Organization declared SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, we had an ongoing project [which] explored the health beneficial effects of pomegranate polyphenols extracted from peels of pomegranate fruit," says Relja Suručić, the researcher leading the study.

"And at that time, reading other authors' studies, we have realized that some of the compounds chemically identified in those extracts showed significant antiviral activities against some other and different viruses. So we decided to test our compounds on SARS-CoV-2."




Pomegranate extracts have been found to have inhibitory effects on the influenza virus, herpes virus, poxviruses and human immunodeficiency virus. /Polona Avanzo/EyeEm|/Getty Creative via CFP



Pomegranate has been previously found to have beneficial effects on other diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, inflammatory diseases and even some types of cancer. Most importantly, pomegranate peel extracts were found to have significant effects in preventing influenza virus entry and RNA transcription.

"We all know that pomegranate fruit had some beneficial health effects," says Suručić. "And in our study, we confirmed some of these aspects like anti-inflammatory effects of lowering cholesterol, lowering sugar."

Suručić's team used computational techniques to see if the compounds from the pomegranate peels could inhibit the viral internalization – when the virus enters the body looking for a host cell – and thus stop the infection.

"I have to say, this is just a small part of a puzzle we reach in our conclusion," warns Suručić. "We said that those compounds have the potential to to inhibit this process, but it's so far away from very clear evidence that it inhibits this process or that it could stop infection, actually, but it's part of a puzzle."





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The team is now continuing the study in vitro, working with the spike proteins of the coronavirus. Results haven't been published yet, but Suručić says they confirm their previous study.

"It's a long way to say it's a drug, or it could stop SARS-CoV-2 infection," says Suručić, who warns it would be an exaggeration to call pomegranate a cure for COVID-19. However, he thinks it has the potential to be used as a complementary treatment or a supplement to treat the infection.

"But there is something, of course, with these natural products – we are finding everyday evidence that some people get infected, some not, even if they are in contact with COVID-19 patients. So maybe there is something in their diet or in the supplements that they are taking that could decrease the risk for getting infected. This is the idea behind our research."



A natural aid – but not a remedy

At this point, Suručić's team is looking at the use of pomegranate peel extract as a preventative treatment, as a supplement for decreasing the risk of getting infected. Ideally, they aim to continue their research exploring the effects of the pomegranate compounds during the phase of viral infection, the replication of the virus inside the body, with a clinical study involving patients with mild symptoms.

For those concerned about having to eat the less than appealing peel of pomegranate, Suručić has a word of reassurance. In the parts of the fruit people eat "there are also the same compounds as in the peel," which is rich in these beneficial polyphenols despite being treated as waste.

Suručić warns against treating any natural treatment as a remedy to COVID-19.

"But eating fruits, many polyphenols from other plant sources like polyphenols, from green tea or coffee, is also known to have some antiviral activity," he says. "So when you mix all that, maybe you can protect yourself in some way to decrease the risk of getting infected."

As scientists around the world race to find treatments to COVID-19, any step forward towards stopping the spread of the virus, or mitigating its effects, is welcome news. And this is not the first study suggesting the benefits of the pomegranate.

Another research study into the effect of virucidal products (physical or chemical agents with the capacity to kill a virus) on COVID-19 asymptomatic patients, found that pomegranate lozengess could reduce the presence of the virus in the patient's mouth.

Video editor: Terry Wilson




 

adsatinder

explorer
uhhh...there is that thing, i forget the name, also called indian gooseberry, very high in vitamin C.....I think it is in that famous tonic too, like Himalayan product. :-k
Extra Vitiamin C always good for helping immune system. I was surprised, something I heard years ago, doctor...in Orissa...Puri, advised big double dose of Vitamin C to help avoid malaria. ...Not to avoid, not to stop it happening, but to avoid serious reaction by the body.

...Amla. ...I have some powder, bought long ago, don't know what to do with it, doesn't seem it would dissolve in water.
Use Amla powder in Desi Cold Drink (Lassi / Sattu) if it suits you or in salad masala, find your own ways to use it.
Amla Powder is cold in nature, use it that way only.
 
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adsatinder

explorer
Covid: How Pfizer plans to resolve cold storage issues in India
By Sohini Das and Ruchika Chitravanshi
December 07, 2020 14:40 IST


The pharma company has developed detailed logistical plans and tools to support effective vaccine transport, storage, and temperature monitoring.

Sohini Das and Ruchika Chitravanshi report.




United States pharma giant Pfizer is working out elaborate cold storage plans to ensure temperature integrity of its vaccine that requires to be maintained at -70 degree Celsius.

Pfizer became the first vaccine maker to seek emergency use authorisation from the Drug Controller General of India.
It applied for approval of its mRNA vaccine candidate, co-developed with BioNTech, on December 4.

The company has developed detailed logistical plans and tools to support effective vaccine transport, storage, and temperature monitoring.
“Globally, we will be utilising road and air modes of transportation via our carrier partners,” a Pfizer spokesperson said.
“We have developed packaging and storage innovations to be fit for the range of locations around the globe where we believe vaccinations will take place,” the Pfizer spokesperson added.

Pfizer has planned three options for storage.
First, ultra-low temperature freezers available commercially that can extend shelf life for up to six months.
Second, specially-designed, temperature-controlled thermal shippers, in which doses will arrive and can be used as temporary storage units.
“The shipper can maintain the recommended storage condition -70 degree Celsius ±10 degree Celsius for 10 days unopened, which allows for transportation globally. Once opened, and if being used as temporary storage by a vaccination centre, it can be used for 30 days by re-icing every five days,” the spokesperson said.
Third, is to have refrigeration units that are commonly available in hospitals where vaccine can be stored for five days at 2-8 degree Celsius.
“We will also utilise GPS-enabled thermal sensors that will enable us to track location and temperature across their pre-set routes,” the spokesperson said.
Experts said maintaining the integrity of the vaccine is not going to be an easy task.
India does not have ultra-low temperature freezers in its vaccine network, a cold-chain equipment maker said.
"The vaccine network has freezers that can maintain 2-8 degree Celsius. Anything other than this would require investment from the government running into thousands of crores,” said the source.
It is not clear whether the DCGI would be waiving the requirement to conduct clinical trials on Indian population.
Drugs and Clinical Trial Rules, 2019, does have a provision that may allow a company to bypass the requirement of local trials.
"If it can provide satisfactory data showing a significant number of Asians in its global clinical trials, the EUA may be considered. The subject expert committee would be deliberating on this. No meeting has been convened yet. One has to respond to such an application within 90-days,” a Central Drugs Standard Control Organisation source said.
During the H1N1 pandemic in 2010, Pfizer was asked to conduct an India trial for its vaccine on smaller sample size, but the talks fell through.

“Every country has its own norms for according approvals. This is why India had the rule to conduct human trials, among say 500 persons, before approval,” Sujatha Rao, former health secretary, said.
She said this requirement has since been dropped in 2019 to enable flexibility for addressing emergencies.


Covid: How Pfizer plans to resolve cold storage issues in India
 
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adsatinder

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'A proper vaccine will take at least 2-3 years'
By SHOBHA WARRIER
October 06, 2020 09:54 IST

'No matter how much you fast track, you cannot say here is a highly efficient vaccine even by the middle of next year or the end of next year.'



IMAGE: A healthcare worker collects a swab sample from a policeman during a check-up for the coronavirus in Mumbai. Photograph: Niharika Kulkarni/ANI Photo
https://www.rediff.com/news/interview/must-read-how-to-protect-yourself-from-covid-19/20200907.htm

In the first part of his interview with Shobha Warrier/Rediff.com, Dr Rakesh Mishra, director, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, said it was inevitable that the coronavirus will come back in more waves.
Asked by Shobha, "Does that mean 2021 also will be like 2020?", Dr Mishra replies in the concluding part of the interview, "Maybe there will be less panic in society as we know how to live with the virus! When we understand the virus, we will be able to avoid the spread of the virus, unlike in 2020."

While Europe and the UK are talking about a second wave, India, the US and Brazil are still experiencing the first wave and the cases are only going up. When will there be in dip in the numbers?
Yes, we have to reach the peak of the first wave for the cases to start coming down.
To reach the peak, we have to test as many people as possible. But we have to go a long way.
One way of knowing whether you are testing enough is, when the positivity is 2%-3%, that is, when you test 100 people, you will get 2-3 positive people. Then you can say, you are testing enough.
But our numbers are 15%-20%. It clearly shows we are not testing enough.
This is where we have to bring in new ways and new logistics.



Another thing is, whether you are tested or not, if people observe self-discipline, we can bring down the numbers.
So, the two important things are, large number of testing and self-discipline.
Yes, it is easier said than done.

When can we expect a second and third wave in India?
It is very uncertain as we are still in the first wave, and we do not know when it will come down.
A second wave might be two months or three months away depending upon how we manage.
And the second wave also depends on the behaviour of the people. Like in Europe, it matched with the opening up of pubs and restaurants and beaches.
Here also, if people start freely going to cinema halls, beaches, restaurants and malls, and city buses start operating, it may probably lead to a second wave.
A crude guess is, it may take another 3-4 months or more for the second wave to happen. Hopefully, the second wave will be a smaller one and will taper off faster.
Remember, what I am saying is not based on scientific data.


The last time when we spoke, you had said that generally it would take 5-6 years of intense study for a vaccine to be used among people.
But this time, all the countries are fast tracking and trying to come out with a vaccine in 3-4 months's time. In Russia, they did not even do a Phase 3 trial.
What kind of repercussions will this have on people who get vaccinated?


It is like declaring that you have a vaccine, feel good about it and make money out of it. But the fact is, a vaccine will not be there unless it is tested.
When I told you last time that it would take five-six years's time for a vaccine to be used, I meant only then we would know how good or bad or how effective a vaccine would be.
We get to know only that after a few years of using the vaccine on many people.
No matter how much you fast track, you cannot say, here is a highly efficient vaccine against COVID-19 even by the middle of next year or the end of next year.
That's because you have to vaccinate a large number of people first, and it will take several months to know how it works like whether it really prevented the person from getting infected.
That's why we do the trials, to see whether the vaccine protects the person from getting infected or not.
Somebody may announce that he has come out with a vaccine that works. But he will not be able to guarantee that this is the vaccine that will ensure you will not get infected after six months or one year. Or, that it will work for all the people. It will take time to get all this information.
To have a proper good vaccine, it will take at least two-three years. Yes, we may have some candidates which people may assume as a vaccine.
It may give you 50% protection, but 50% protection is meaningless for a large country like India when it has 50 crore (500 million) people not protected.
Yes, it is better than nothing.

Suppose there is a vaccine by early next year, would you say that for those who are getting vaccinated then is like participating in a phase 3 trial?



Yes! When you give a vaccine next year, it is like the continuation of a phase 3 trial, or a phase 4 trial.
Anybody taking the vaccine even after a phase 3 trial is a volunteer, according to me. Their data will be recorded and there will be follow ups too. It is good.
If 50,000 got vaccinated and if it is considered safe, you can give to more people. Only then we will know the efficacy.

Would you say that there is some danger involved when you take the vaccine the moment it comes out?
Yes, there is. See they had to stop the Oxford vaccine in between because a volunteer fell sick. It is a good sign that the system is alert.
Imagine if the vaccine is dangerous for certain people with certain sickness. These things will become apparent only when the number is very large. If you are testing only 10,000 to 20,000 people, you may not get all the variants.
That's why the real trial will continue for a long time, and only after that, we will get the full data.

The advice that you hear now is that you have to learn to live with the virus. How do we live with the virus?
Have discipline, wear a mask, travel less and maintain social distancing.
In short, we have to reduce the chance of getting infected, and also not infecting others unknowingly if you are infected.
This is living with the virus!

How long will this new normal continue?
At least for a year or so, we have to follow this new normal.
While people without any health issues are safe, those with co-morbidities and elderly people will have to be careful.
We will have marriage parties with very few people.
We will travel less.
That is the new normal. Yes, a lot of adjustments have to be made.
We have to chase the virus so that it will not come to you.

Does that mean 2021 also will be like 2020?
Maybe there will be less panic in society as we know how to live with the virus!
When we understand the virus, we will be able to avoid the spread of the virus, unlike in 2020.


'A proper vaccine will take at least 2-3 years'
 
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