Corona Virus Covid 19

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Lockdown in Delhi extended till May 17 with strict restrictions;
Metro rail services to remain temporarily suspended, marriage ceremonies at public places/ banquet halls/hotels prohibited, marriage ceremonies allowed to be organized at home or in Court

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Delhi lockdown: What's allowed and what's not

Delhi lockdown extension: What's allowed and what's not allowed
Delhi will remain under shutdown till May 17


  • May 09 2021, 14:42 ist
  • updated: May 09 2021, 16:28 ist
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[Image: Policemen stand in front of Jama Masjid or Grand Mosque on Jumat-ul-Vida or the last Friday of the holy fasting month of Ramadan, during a lockdown. Credit: Reuters Photo]

The Arvind Kejriwal-led government in Delhi extended the Covid-19 lockdown on Sunday to curb the spread of the fatal virus. Delhi will remain under shutdown till May 17.
"We are taking more stringent measures. We are shutting Metro services also," Kejriwal said in his press conference. He said the lockdown was extended to further curb the spread of the infection.


Here's a look at what's allowed and what's not allowed in this extended lockdown

1. Delhi Metro will not function this week.
2. Weddings will be prohibited unless they are happening at a court or at home. Not more than 20 people will be allowed to gather at weddings. Movement for the purpose of weddings will be allowed on the production of a soft or hard copy of a marriage card. Sound systems, DJs, catering and tentage for the same will not be allowed.
3. E-pass issued earlier for movement related to essential services will continue to remain valid.
4. Essential services are exempted from the lockdown. Print and electronic media, government officials working in departments such as health, police, electricity board, water, etc. Healthcare staff are also exempt. Patients and pregnant women are exempt from the lockdown restrictions.
5. Those going to get tested for Covid-19 and vaccination are exempt from providing a valid ID card. Those caring for medical patients are also exempt.
6. Travel to catch a flight, train, a bus will be allowed on production of a valid ticket.
7. Shops selling essential goods and providing essential services will be allowed to function, such as grocery shops, vegetables, fruits, milk, bank employees, private security companies.
8. All modes of transport will be allowed to carry passengers, however, only those exempt from the lockdown will be allowed to travel on these modes of transport.
9. Only home delivery of food and takeaways will be allowed. Dine-in facilities at restaurants will be suspended.
10. Public places such as parks, gyms, swimming pools will be shut and only training of those participating in national and international games will be allowed.
11. If workers are present within a construction site or factory, they will be allowed to work. If workers need to be transported to the worksite, such an activity will not be allowed.



Delhi lockdown extension: What's allowed and what's not allowed
 

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Delhi received 499 MT oxygen on May 8 against 700 MT ordered by SC: Raghav Chadha

Sunday, 09 May 2021 | PTI | New Delhi
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Delhi received 499 MT oxygen on May 8 against 700 MT ordered by SC: Raghav Chadha


Delhi received just 499 metric tonnes of oxygen on May 8 against the average supply of 700 MT ordered by the Supreme Court, AAP MLA Raghav Chadha said on Sunday.
Over the last week, the city got an average of 533 MT oxygen daily, which is 76 percent of the quantity directed by the SC.
On Saturday, only four healthcare facilities in the national capital, with 1,271 oxygen beds, sent out oxygen shortage SOS calls, the city government said.
The Delhi government supplied 15.50 MT of oxygen to these hospitals, according to official data.

Delhi received 499 MT oxygen on May 8 against 700 MT ordered by SC: Raghav Chadha
 

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Delhi got 499 MT oxygen on May 8 against 700 MT
May 09, 2021 16:17

image


Delhi received just 499 metric tonnes of oxygen on May 8 against the average supply of 700 MT ordered by the Supreme Court, AAP MLA Raghav Chadha said on Sunday.

Over the last week, the city got an average of 533 MT oxygen daily, which is 76 percent of the quantity directed by the SC.

On Saturday, only four healthcare facilities in the national capital, with 1,271 oxygen beds, sent out oxygen shortage SOS calls, the city government said.

The Delhi government supplied 15.50 MT of oxygen to these hospitals, according to official data.

-- PTI

Delhi got 499 MT oxygen on May 8 against 700 MT
 

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Delhi Lockdown Extended: Will You Need An E-Pass For Travelling From Noida/Ghaziabad To Delhi During Shutdown Period? Know Here

Delhi Lockdown Extension: During the shutdown period, essential services will be allowed, however, anyone travelling in the NCT (National Capital Territory) will require an e-pass issued by the Delhi government (except for those involved in essential services).

Updated: May 9, 2021 1:41 PM IST

By India.com News DeskEmailEdited by Surabhi ShauryaEmailFollow


Delhi Lockdown Extended: Will You Need An E-Pass For Travelling From Noida/Ghaziabad To Delhi During Shutdown Period? Know Here


Delhi Lockdown Extension News

New Delhi:
Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal on Sunday extended the ongoing lockdown for another week up to May 17 morning and asserted that metro train services will be halted during the period. This is the fourth time when Kejriwal has extended the lockdown in the national capital which was first imposed on April 19. Earlier, the Delhi Chief Minister had extended the lockdown till May 10. Address an online media briefing, Kejriwal said although COVID-19 cases have come down in the last few days, any slackness would squander the gains achieved so far in the current wave of the pandemic. During the shutdown period, essential services will be allowed, however, anyone travelling in the NCT (National Capital Territory) will require an e-pass issued by the Delhi government (except for those involved in essential services).


Can You Travel From Noida/Ghaziabad to Delhi During Shutdown Period?

To travel amidst the lockdown, a person (who is not involved in essential activities) needs to have a valid e-pass.

Who Needs An E-Pass?


  • People working in IT and Internet services, broadcasting and cable services.
  • Banks employees
  • People going to ATM.
  • Private security personnel.

Here’s how you can apply for an e-pass online.
  • Step 1: Login to epass.jantasamvad.org
  • Step 2: Select your preferred language
  • Step 2: Now, select ‘e-pass for travel during curfew’ and click on Submit.
  • Step 3: Fill the form
  • Step 4: Upload your identification proof.
  • Step 5: Once your application will be approved, you will receive an SMS.
  • Step 6: Download the E-Pass or you can take a print out

Follow These Steps to check e-pass status?




Delhi Lockdown Extended: Will You Need An E-Pass For Travelling From Noida/Ghaziabad To Delhi During Shutdown Period? Know Here
 

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RT-PCR negative verification stopped at airports

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
BENGALURU, MAY 08, 2021 02:00 IST
UPDATED: MAY 08, 2021 02:00 IST

The State Health Department that had made it mandatory for passengers arriving from Maharashtra, Kerala, Punjab and Chandigarh to possess RT-PCR negative reports (not older than 72 hrs) has now stopped the process of verification of the the same at the airport.

The concerned airways were made responsible to ensure that those who came had a negative report and those who arrived without the report were tested at the airport to prevent further spread.

“Now, as per the ICMR’s advisory on COVID-19 testing during the second wave and considering the current situation, the process of verifying the RT-PCR negative test report for individuals arriving from Maharashtra, Kerala, Punjab and Chandigarh has been stopped. However, it is mandatory that those with COVID -19 symptoms carry an RT-PCR negative report,” stated a circular issued on Friday.


New cases

Meanwhile, Karnataka on Friday reported 48,781 new cases of COVID-19, taking the total to 18,38,885. Of these, 21,376 cases are from Bengaluru Urban alone.

As many as 28,623 persons were discharged on Friday, taking the total recoveries to 12,844,420. The State now has 5,36,641 active patients.

The positivity rate for the day stood at 30.69%.

Testing
As many as 1,58,902 tests were conducted in the last 24 hours, including 1,48,157 RT-PCR tests. With this, the total number of tests rose to 2,67,14,702.

RT-PCR negative verification stopped at airports
 

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New norms for inter-state travel evokes mixed response
Most states still require a negative RT-PCR report from travellers despite the ICMR’s advisory to do away with the practice.bloomberg


Most states still require a negative RT-PCR report from travellers despite the ICMR’s advisory to do away with the practice.bloomberg2 min read . Updated: 07 May 2021, 10:32 PM IST

Rhik Kundu, Leroy Leo


The Indian Council of Medical Research’s (ICMR’s) advisory to do away with the need for RT-PCR testing for inter-state travel has evoked mixed reaction from the travel industry, especially as most states have different norms, which may cause confusion among travellers

The Indian Council of Medical Research’s (ICMR’s) advisory to do away with the need for RT-PCR testing for inter-state travel has evoked mixed reaction from the travel industry, especially as most states have different norms, which may cause confusion among travellers.
The country’s apex bio-medical research agency had issued the advisory on Tuesday to reduce the load on diagnostic laboratories testing for covid-19 after the sharp surge seen in infections led to delays in testing.

Most state governments still require a negative RT-PCR report from travellers entering their states, a senior airline official with a no-frill carrier said.
“Unless states are on board with the plan, this will only create confusion among passengers and could further discourage passengers from booking flight tickets," the official said on condition of anonymity. “You can’t have different directives from the ICMR and states. The states and ICMR should work together for this," the official said.

The West Bengal government had on Tuesday itself issued a directive stating that all flight passengers coming from other states will have to possess a mandatory negative RT-PCR test report conducted within 72 hours of flight departure, to be allowed entry into the state. This directive came into effect on Friday.
There are some travel industry official who feel that the latest move by ICMR, if implemented in consultation with states, will benefit passengers in the long run as delays in RT-PCR reports have led to travellers cancelling their plans.
“We welcome this move, as it would reduce the load on labs. There is a huge confusion on what laws there are between each state (for passengers)," said Rikant Pitti, co-founder of online travel platform EaseMyTrip.

“A lot of people are going back to their native place and more than 50% of queries we get are related to restrictions, which only add to the chaos," Pitti said.

Some states such as Gujarat, Rajasthan, Uttarakhand and Kerala have similar orders in place like West Bengal, while others such as Delhi and Maharashtra have state-specific test requirements. Delhi asks for negative test reports for passengers coming from Maharashtra, while the latter has made it mandatory for passengers from West Bengal, Uttar Pradesh, Delhi, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Kerala, and Goa to carry such reports.
With RT-PCR test kits in shortage, Jayaprakash Muliyil, chairman of the scientific advisory committee of the ICMR’s National Institute of Epidemiology at Chennai, said it is better to seek rapid antigen test (RAT) reports, which are less accurate but also faster, while also looking for symptoms at the airport.

“Neither test is perfect. Even RT-PCR test does not detect covid-19 in early stages and the report takes a long time, sometimes even four days, to come. So logically, it is much safer to do a RAT because you will get the result in half an hour. If it is negative but the person is showing symptoms then do the RT-PCR test," Muliyil said. A serological survey showed that for every case that was picked up by RT-PCR, there were about 30 that were missed, Muliyil said. It is better for states to look at faster detection of passengers with covid-19 than simply asking then to come with a negative test report to the airport, he said.


New norms for inter-state travel evokes mixed response
 

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Uttar Pradesh extends Covid-19 lockdown by a week till May 17
Uttar Pradesh government on Saturday extended the coronavirus curfew by a week in the state amid surge in virus cases.

Santosh Sharma
Lucknow
May 9, 2021
UPDATED: May 9, 2021 12:21 IST



The coronavirus lockdown has been extended by a week to May 17 in Uttar Pradesh as state continues to combat the deadly virus. (File Pic)

Amid growing coronavirus cases in the state, the Uttar Pradesh government on Saturday decided to increase the duration of the curfew to May 17, an official spokesman said. The lockdown will end at 7 am on May 17 (Monday).

Earlier, the state government had announced curfew till May 10.


It has been extended to May 17 and all shops and establishments will now remain closed till UP government's further notice, he said.

This arrangement has been extended for a week, he said adding that decision has been taken to break the chain of second wave of coronavirus that persists to grip the country.

On Saturday, 298 succumbed to Covid-19 in Uttar Pradesh and the state reported 26,847 fresh cases, pushing the state’s infection count to 14,80,315, according data provided by the state government.

The fresh deaths were reported from the capital city, Lucknow (38), followed by Kanpur (23), Jhansi (18), among others.

So far, the deadly virus has claimed 15,170 lives in Uttar Pradesh.

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Uttar Pradesh extends Covid-19 lockdown by a week till May 17
 

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How to use oximeter properly to get accurate blood oxygen SpO2 readings -

Gadgets Now / Updated: May 8, 2021, 09:20AM IST


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[Image: How to use oximeter properly to get accurate blood oxygen SpO2 readings]

Oximeters have become a go-to gadget for almost all households to battle Covid-19 crisis across India. Reliable oximeters start at around Rs 2000 in India and it helps in recording the blood oxygen levels along with heart rate. Oximeters have become an important tool for citizens to understand health status, especially for Covid patients. At the same time, it is crucial to follow the right procedure to get accurate blood oxygen readings. The government is spreading awareness around how to accurately use oximeter, follow the steps:

1.
Be calm and rest your body for at least 10 minutes before measuring blood oxygen levels.
2.
Sit down straight and keep your finger near the heart level and stay still
Sit straight, be calm and keep hands near the heart level. Insert the pulse oximeter on the tip of your index finger. And stay still. Don’t move while the measurement is taking place.
3.
Set the oximeter on your index or middle finger above the nails directly on the skin
Don’t put the oximeter on your nails. Insert it properly to cover the fingertips and ensure that the device is direct contact with the skin. You can either put it on your index or middle finger on the left or right hand.
4.
Keep the oximeter stable and don’t move
Secure the oximeter properly so that it doesn’t wobble. Ensure that there’s no movement at all when the measurement is taking place.
5.
Be calm and let the readings stabilise. Consider the highest reading
Be calm and ignore the initial readings. Let the device stabilise and then consider the highest reading.
6.
Record Spo2 three times a day unless you find any health problem
The rule of thumb is to record SpO2 three times a day and the government recommends visiting a doctor only when the level dips below 92%.



 

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The Great Indian Oxygen Famine
The artificial scarcity of oxygen and this oxygen famine is a result of bad policies and malicious political designs.

BY
INDRA SHEKHAR SINGH
MAY 4, 2021

The Great Indian Oxygen Famine


I had never seen a man die gasping for breath until I met Chander Prakash. He was 43 years old, about 5’6’’ and with O2 saturation of 35. To me, he was a stranger who I had lent my oxygen cylinder, but to my friend, he was her maid’s husband and to Lata, his wife, the world. I met them at the Max Hospital in New Delhi’s Saket at 9 PM in the emergency dock area, amid pleadings for a bed and a Rapid Antigen test. The scene was ghastly, as for the past five hours he had been carted from hospital to hospital in a sliver Duster only to be rejected each time.
It took another hour, before tests were done, and we had to take a call seeing our depleting O2. We had to get oxygen to Chander, otherwise his death was imminent. It was nearing 10 PM, when he began his fight against death. First we drove to Subhash Nagar, where a kind hearted Sikh man was running an ‘oxygen langar’ in the shadow of the deserted Pacific Mall. Four patients were ahead of us and our cylinder was almost over. Patients sat on pavements, coughing, confused and wheezing, fighting to survive. Our pleas for admission were answered when a volunteer saw Chander’s O2 level dipping below 30. Lata and him were let in. By this time Chander could still walk, slowly, and Lata was hopeful.
The alarmed volunteer (sevadar) told us, “We had (oxygen) cylinders coming to us, but the police has stopped our truck. They are accusing us of black marketing, whereas we are giving seva to people for free.” He was sad he couldn’t help us. The Sikh community was risking disease and death at this hour to help people. He warned us that the concentrator would only sustain Chander, and we urgently needed our cylinder to be refilled.



It was 11.30 PM, and an empty dark road awaited us. We searched oxygen through Naraina, and other refilling stations until we reached Mayapuri, where people had been waiting since 6 AM for oxygen. We thought this was the end for Chander, but if almost through miracle, a policeman helped us. He almost saved Chander’s life, we thought, while exiting the filling station at 1:54 AM.
When we reached the ‘langar’, Chander had already been without oxygen for 30 mins, and his levels were critical. He was disoriented and could barely get into the car, and even after we rejuvenated him with oxygen, he was short of breath and in discomfort. In my mind, it was clear, maybe he won’t even survive the night. We prayed as we drove from AIIMS, Safdarjung, ESI hospital and finally to Max again, hoping he lives the night. All along this, we were only met with distressed and overworked doctors, three patients sharing one bed at AIIMS emergency and at Safdarjung, the scene was macabre. As Safdarjung was not a designated COVID-19 hospital, they blankly refused. Just outside the emergency, people were gasping to their deaths. They were all helpless, poor and couldn’t breathe. No hospital or doctor helped them, as a daughter embraced her living mother, for one last time.



By now Chander’s oxygen had dropped to 10 and we were refused again by Max, due to no beds and sent us home. A kind doctor did prescribe medicines, but maybe he knew Chander’s fate. By this time it was 6 AM, Chander had lived the night, but his state was very poor. His legs couldn’t move, he could barely talk and probably had multiple organ damage. Two hours later, he died of a stroke, in pain and breathless, next to his two children. But I knew he didn’t die of COVID-19, he died because he was poor and uncared for. He died because the government’s COVID-19 crisis plan was working, and the poverty and population problem was being solved with one stone, i.e., COVID-19.


PLAN-DEMIC
‘Oxygen, oxygen everywhere but not a litre to breathe’. Yes, Mr Coleridge, this is the rhyme of the modern mariner, sailing through this dreaded ‘plan-demic’. Why is this a ‘plan-demic’? Because the government knew what was coming, yet PM-CARES funds amassed bank interests and not oxygen plants, in Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, et al, where thousands of deaths could have been averted. Perhaps, it would have made Dr Harsh Vardhan less of a liar too.
Far from “adequate supplies of oxygen”, Delhi hospitals are rejecting patients due to lack of oxygen, meanwhile others die in hospitals due to oxygen shortage. The government has stressed on home care of mild symptoms, yet by shutting private refilling station in Delhi, made it impossible for patients to procure their oxygen.
May 1 and 2 saw the worst oxygen crisis for home care patients in Delhi. A volunteer Aman Sharma, 27, travelled over 300 kms around Delhi-NCR reporting on oxygen situation, “There is no oxygen in the city. All the major centres are waiting for tankers. There is no supply and States are opting for regionalism instead of humanity,” he said. His observation reflects the sombre mood of the city as even big centres such as from Shaheen Bagh to Mayapuri didn’t have oxygen. Meanwhile, Kejriwal is telecasting his incompetence, pleading to Modi, like a powerless chump.



Delhi is blaming Modi and Modi is blaming someone else, while innocent people are dying. New age politicians are governed by Machiavellian rules and Twitter likes, not by their heart. At this point, Amartya Sen’s analysis of the a food famine comes to mind. He had said that famines are caused not by the shortage of food, but by inefficient distribution systems. Similarly, today the artificial scarcity of oxygen and this oxygen famine is a result of bad policies and malicious political designs. We have enough oxygen in the country and the world, then why is failing to reach the dying poor or the hospitals in Delhi? How many dying Chanders, how many orphaned children and how many lying politicians will it take before people will rise, and take back their right to breathe? I think at this point, not very many.


The Great Indian Oxygen Famine
 
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