Corona Virus Covid 19

Coronavirus News: Mumbai, Delhi Covid Cases To Peak Between Jan 15-20: Expert
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Jan 10, 2022


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The Covid cases in Mumbai and Delhi - the two big metropolitan cities - will peak around January 15-20, says Dr Shashank Joshi, member, COVID-19 Task Force, Maharashtra. "We should be out of this soon if we're following the South Africa model," he says.
 
Delhi Issues Fresh Order On E-Passes For Weekend Curfew, Night Curfew | Check Full Guidelines Here

Delhi Lockdown News Today: The guidelines from the DDMA comes as the national capital witnessed a major spike in coronavirus cases in the past two weeks.


Updated: January 12, 2022 6:57 PM IST

By India.com News Desk
Edited by Manmath Nayak




Delhi Issues Fresh Order On E-Passes For Weekend Curfew, Night Curfew | Check Full Guidelines Here



It must be noted that the national capital Delhi on Tuesday logged 21,259 new Covid-19 cases.


Delhi Lockdown News Today: Days after imposing night curfew and weekend curfew in the national capital, the Delhi Disaster Management Authority (DDMA) on Wednesday issued a fresh clarification saying the e-passes issued for movement connected to “essential goods and services” or “exempted category”, shall be valid during the entire duration of imposition of weekend and night curfew in view of Covid cases.
“As per the previous orders, movement of the individuals for the activities specified as ‘Essential goods and Services’ or ‘Exempted category’ as prescribed in DDMA order have been allowed for movement during night curfew and weekend curfew with the possession of e-pass (in soft or hard copy) only,” DDMA said in an official order.



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The DDMA further added that in this context, it is clarified that e-pass possessed by a person on or after January 4 ( from the date of issuance of DDMA order) for movement connected to ‘Essential goods and services’ or ‘Exempted category’, shall be valid during the entire period of imposition of night curfew and weekend curfew.

The guidelines from the DDMA comes as the national capital witnessed a major spike in coronavirus cases in the past two weeks.

Earlier in the day, Delhi Health Minister Satyendra Jain said the number of hospital admissions in the national capital due to Covid-19 has stabilised over the last five days, indicating that the current wave of the pandemic may have peaked. He further added that Delhi is expected to report 25,000 cases on Wednesday.
It must be noted that the national capital Delhi on Tuesday logged 21,259 new Covid-19 cases. It reported 23 Covid fatalities on Tuesday, and has already recorded 93 fatalities in the first 11 days of the month.
Earlier, the Delhi government had said it has taken action against 4,434 people for not wearing masks in public or work places. The official data stated that till Monday , over 4,434 people were challaned for violation of masks, 107 for not maintaining social distancing, 17 people for spitting in public places and two for consumption of liquor or tobacco items in public places in the city’s 11 districts.

The highest violation for mask was recorded in southeast district at 780, followed by east with 730 instances, north with 583, and southwest with 559 instances of violations. At 156, the lowest violations were recorded in New Delhi district, it said.
Earlier during the weekend curfew, authorities issued 8,935 challans and imposed fines worth over Rs 1.76 crore for alleged violation of COVID guidelines.
During the two-day curfew, it lodged 751 FIRS under section 188 of the Indian Penal Code and issued 3,156 challans.
The move comes as Lt Governor Anil Baijal directed the police commissioner and divisional commissioner (revenue) to strictly ensure compliance with Covid-appropriate behaviour in line with the latest guidelines of the Delhi Disaster Management Authority (DDMA), officials had earlier said.


Delhi Issues Fresh Order On E-Passes For Weekend Curfew, Night Curfew | Check Full Guidelines Here
 
COVID Virus Starts Losing Ability To Infect Within 5 Minutes In Air: Study

Coronavirus' ability to infect people starts decreasing within five minutes of being airborne, according to a new study.

Updated: January 12, 2022 7:01 PM IST

By IANS
Edited by IANS



COVID Virus Starts Losing Ability To Infect Within 5 Minutes In Air: Study


The CDC data estimated that 98 per cent of active COVID cases in the US are of the Omicron variant. (Photo: IANS)

London: Coronavirus’ ability to infect people starts decreasing within five minutes of being airborne and the virus loses about 90 per cent of its infectivity within 20 minutes of being in air, according to a new study. The yet to be peer-reviewed study is the first to explore how the virus survives in exhaled air, and emphasises the importance of maintaining physical distancing and mask-wearing, the Guardian reported. Ventilation, though still worthwhile, is likely to have a lesser impact.

“People have been focused on poorly ventilated spaces and thinking about airborne transmission over metres or across a room. I’m not saying that doesn’t happen, but I think still the greatest risk of exposure is when you’re close to someone,” Prof Jonathan Reid, director of the University of Bristol’s Aerosol Research Centre and the study’s lead author, was quoted as saying.

“When you move further away, not only is the aerosol diluted down, there’s also less infectious virus because the virus has lost infectivity (as a result of time),” he added.

For the study, researchers from the University of Bristol developed an apparatus that allowed them to generate any number of tiny, virus-containing particles and gently levitate them between two electric rings for anywhere between five seconds to 20 minutes, while tightly controlling the temperature, humidity and UV light intensity of their surroundings, the report said.

They found that the viral particles start to rapidly lose water and dry out when they exit the relatively moist and carbon dioxide-rich conditions of the lungs.
The transition to lower levels of CO2 is associated with a rapid increase in pH – factors which disrupt the virus’s ability to infect human cells. However, the speed at which the particles dry out varies according to the relative humidity of the surrounding air, the report said.

When this was lower than 50 per cent – similar to the relatively dry air found in many offices – the virus had lost around half of its infectivity within five seconds, after which the decline was slower and more steady, with a further 19 per cent loss over the next five minutes.

At 90 per cent humidity – roughly equivalent to a steam or shower room – the decline in infectivity was more gradual, with 52 per cent of particles remaining infectious after five minutes, dropping to about 10 per cent after 20 minutes, after which there was no difference between the two conditions.
But, the study showed that the temperature of the air made no difference to viral infectivity, contradicting the widely-held belief that viral transmission is lower at high temperatures, the report said.
“It means that if I’m meeting friends for lunch in a pub today, the primary (risk) is likely to be me transmitting it to my friends, or my friends transmitting it to me, rather than it being transmitted from someone on the other side of the room,” said Reid.
This highlights the importance of wearing a mask in situations where people cannot physically distance, he added.
The researchers found the same effects across all three SARS-CoV-2 variants the team has tested so far, including Alpha. They hope to start experiments with the Omicron variant in the coming weeks, the report said.

 
'The severe cases are mostly unvaccinated people'
By VAIHAYASI PANDE DANIEL
Last updated on: December 28, 2021 14:46 IST


'In our ICUs, the majority are unvaccinated people.'
'Out of the hospital, in the community, we see that -- whether you are vaccinated or whether you're not vaccinated -- the symptoms are more or less the same.'





IMAGE: Karol Bagh market seen packed with shoppers amid a surge in COVID-19 cases, December 27, 2021. Photograph: ANI Photo

South African general practitioner Dr Angelique Coetzee, 61, was the first doctor to swiftly put the world on alert, in mid-November 2021, to the rise of a possible significant new and worrying variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, that causes COVID-19.
In her practice in Wonderboom South, Pretoria, Dr Coetzee suddenly and very astutely observed patients coming in with a different set of clinical symptoms caused by the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant of COVID-19 and promptly but cautiously took action.
Her timely measures helped the world prepare for the onset of Omicron much quicker than it did for Delta.
Chairperson of the South African Medical Association, Dr Coetzee has treated over 800 COVID-19 patients, 110 of them suffering Omicron.
In the first of an exclusive two-part interview, Dr Coetzee tells Vaihayasi Pande Daniel/Rediff.com, "The symptoms are less severe. We're not saying that you're not going to get sick. If you get sick, and you get severe disease, you will get a pneumonia and you will be very sick. But the majority of people have gotten light disease or mild disease."




IMAGE: Government Civil Hospital staff in Ahmedabad throw flower petals on Prafulbhai Dave, 48, following his discharge after recovering from Omicron, December 27, 2021. Photograph: PTI Photo

You are right in the middle of the Omicron situation over there in South Africa. In your view right now: What's the good news? And what's the bad news?
The good news is still that the majority of people are getting mild disease.
And the South African numbers are down this last three days -- but that can be because it's festival season and people don't go and test. But the infectivity rate is more or less the same which is 27 per cent.
The death rate is very low. And that's about the only big thing I can tell you.
We have also stopped the track and tracing of contacts, because it's not worth it. We have stopped quarantine for people who were in contact with someone who was positive.
That's where we are.

What would be the rate of vaccination in South Africa -- the percentage roughly?
Roughly about 44 per cent of the adults.

But you feel sure the Omicron situation is not as bad as it was for Delta, even though only 44 per cent adults are vaccinated in South Africa?
These are two different diseases.
For Delta, on the community level, also we saw severe cases -- a lot.
For Omicron, we don't see that lot of severe cases at the community level. So, the symptoms are less severe. We're not saying that you're not going to get sick. If you get sick, and you get severe disease, you will get a pneumonia and you will be very sick. But the majority of people have gotten light disease or mild disease.



IMAGE: Ahmedabad's Civil Hospital has opened a special Omicron ward. Photograph: PTI Photo


The people who you are seeing in your practice -- who are vaccinated, either once or twice -- are definitely mostly getting light disease?
Yes. The majority.
In our ICUs, the majority are unvaccinated people.
Out of the hospital, in the community, we see that -- whether you are vaccinated or whether you're not vaccinated -- the symptoms are more or less the same.
However, the severe cases are mostly unvaccinated people.

And the severe cases are amounting only in a few deaths? Not that many deaths?
Yes. On December 24: We had 18,800 people positive out of 64,000 tested; 81 deaths and 320 people, across all facilities, hospitalised.
On the 25th we had 30 deaths 14,800 positive people.
And on the 26th we had 5,600 positive, 41 deaths and 42 hospitalised.



IMAGE: A woman receives a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre in Ahmedabad, December 27, 2021. Photograph: Amit Dave/Reuters


From a sort of commonsensical point of view -- for anybody in the world, whether it's in South Africa, whether it's in India -- it is important that we try and put off or push off, as long as possible, our exposure to any of the variants of this virus -- not get sick from them, so our immunity has a chance to get stronger and stronger.
And then when we eventually contract COVID-19, our immunity will be strong enough to deal with it well?

Yes. You will most probably only get then mild disease.

So, it's all about how long we can keep pushing off getting in contact with the COVID-19 virus. Would that be correct?
Yes.
What is important is that you need to tell your people the symptoms. If you know the symptoms, it means you know when you are sick and then you can isolate if you are sick.
But if you don't know the symptoms and if you don't know what means severe disease and if you don't know what means mild disease, then how are you going to know that you are sick?


Have you ever got COVID-19?
Me? No! Never! And I have seen so many COVID-19 patients.

You're very careful?
I follow the same (right) principles. I've been vaccinated. I wear my mask. Wash my hands. My rooms have good ventilation. I don't use the air con. I open my windows.

And the mask you wear is an N95 mask?
Only an N95 mask.
And no other protective gear. Nothing.
Wash my hands. Yes, I do exactly what I am telling my patients.

Do you meet people regularly?
I am full-time practice. Up until now I have seen 110 Omicron patients. I see patients every day. I examine them. I see them physically. They come into my consulting rooms every day, except now over the holidays, the festive season.



IMAGE: Dr Angelique Coetzee. Photograph: ANI Photo


Please correct me if I'm wrong, but that still is quite different from meeting somebody socially, taking off your mask and eating with them? Isn't that correct?
(Tartly) I'm not stupid (laughs). I don't go meeting such people. I'm telling the people not to do that (for their protection). And I won't do it either (laughs)!

I must ask you this because people, for whatever reason, feel it is safe to socialise outside their smaller family groups and take off their masks and dine together.
I will only eat with my family who I know are vaccinated, when we are all together, that's fine. I don't have a problem with my own very close family. But you won't see me go socialising.
I will go to the shops and buy my food, but wear my mask. And, you know, our shops are very strict -- you have to put your mask on. And you have to sanitise (using sanitiser provided by the shop) when you go in.
I think the sanitising is useless. But you know what? It will help some other people. That's what we do. They are very strict in South Africa, in the shopping centres and in the malls with this. They are very strict.


Why do you feel sanitising is useless?
How do I know what is in that sanitiser. Is it 70 per cent alcohol?!

I just say yes and use it -- it's fine with me. But if in the surgery (in her consulting rooms) I really touch people, I use the correct things to sterilise afterwards.


'The severe cases are mostly unvaccinated people'
 
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