Do's & Dont's in Himalayas while traveling, trekking, driving, riding and camping etc

Re: Do's & Dont's in Himalayas while traveling, trekking, driving, riding and camping

Top singh ji Juley

posts by you are very informative ,educating and interesting.

Lots of learning and i enjoyed it too..

I would like to meet you in person when i am in himachal.

Juley
 
Re: Do's & Dont's in Himalayas while traveling, trekking, driving, riding and camping

He left his wife there? That's quite horrifying. I'd say don't go anywhere at all with someone like that lol

Great tips here. Honking can be quite sensitive in different parts of teh world so its always good to learn what is acceptable in a place you are abt to visit. U want to survive but u dont want to anger the locals eh
 

Nester

Member
Re: Do's & Dont's in Himalayas while traveling, trekking, driving, riding and camping

hi Anupji

how can both be used,please explain

In most cars sold in India cabin heating is provided with the heat from the coolant. That is why on a cold winter morning the heater does not give forth warm air immediately after start up.
Some cars have electric heating elements for instant heat even without the engine being warmed up.

And yes, in the hills bi-level AC is required - warm air from footwell vents and cold air to the windshield.
 

anupmathur

Super Moderator
Staff member
Re: Do's & Dont's in Himalayas while traveling, trekking, driving, riding and camping

hi Anupji

how can both be used,please explain
Sorry, I missed this for so long! :eek:
In fact Top Singh ji drew my attention to this today.

Nester, the user manual of every car describes how to set the controls for bi-level air conditioning, if the feature has been provided. As far as I know most cars have it.
 

rajeshghai

Member
Re: Do's & Dont's in Himalayas while traveling, trekking, driving, riding and camping

then the youngsters started abusing that driver as they thought he is alone & they are 7 people but soon all the truck drivers came out of their trucks & started beating all of them.

So Don't Honk in the traffic jam have patience
well, I would say that would have made them sensible enough for future.
 

srinime

New Member
Re: Do's & Dont's in Himalayas while traveling, trekking, driving, riding and camping

The worst thing a tourist can do is hurt the religious sentiments of the locals. Someone earlier in this thread wrote about being careful to avoid grave stones and such. Also dancing at passes (however elating it may be) and near temples. All are strict no nos.
Hello to all ..Khamzang ena lay.. Juley..

While traveling in Himalayas you will see the Prayer Flags put by the Buddhist at Highest Passes, Monasteries, Bridges, Trees etc. The Lamas using the woodblocks make images on the flags and purify it by sacred mantras so that the wind from the highest places blow for the betterment of the universe. You will see at the center of the Prayer flag, there is an image of a Wind Horse, and at the corners are four sacred animals i.e. Garuda, Dragon, Tiger and Snow Lion representing the virtues of Wisdom, Power, Confidence and fearless joy respectively. These are called DARCHO or LUNGTA in Ladakhi and Tibetan language. Since these are religious flags and ornament of mountains, one should not touch it by his body for fun etc. It has fixed by ropes for the purpose of worshiping by the travelers at the places and not to touch or to play for fun. So DON'T touch these flags and destroy its purity which is fixed for the betterment of mankind and universe. Here is a pic at Tanglangla a person touching it just for fun or to shoot a photograph instead of worshiping it or making clockwise round around it.

DON'T TOUCH THE PRAYER FLAGS IN HIMALAYAS..
Juley..
Top Singh Bodh
Net problem, the pic is in the next post.
- - - Updated - - -
 
Last edited:
Juley Top SIngh Ji,

Thank you for everything that you have shared in this forum and elsewhere. It is gaining knowledge about our nature and respecting them.

I would like to introduce myself here.

I am Yashwanth from Bangalore.

Born in a urban city but my life is always towards the villages. Love the nature and wish to spend most of my time with it. As I stay in south of our country I have got this opportunity to visit the western ghats often. Sir as you have mentioned in your previous posts it is the duty of every citizen to protect the nature in every possible way for our own good and for the future generation.

If it was not you and many others who have taken the initiative to protect the Lakes and passes we would have not got a chance to see them as it is today.

My dream is to come to the Himalayas and The Manasa Sarovar. When I visit these places would like to serve the nature and the locals in any manner. (Most of the time its the locals who help us. A salute to them)

Sir, apart from we doing it in our own trips We would like to work with you on these passes, the lakes, the remote villages in any manner. Kindly give us a opportunity to join you in these occasions.

My first trip to the Himalayas will be probably next year on my Bullet from then hoping to do it every year if possible. But my intention is to know a little bit about it before seeing the nature. SO I am going Through the Forum. From the maps, roads, passes, Flora and Fauna, The Monasteries, and the lakes and landed here. There are lot of things that we get to learn here. Thank you Sir.

Thanks to EVERYONE for spreading the Knowledge of the Himalayas.

Juley

Yashwanth
 

nikhil2877

Well-Known Member
Respected Top Singh Ji and other learned travellers !!

This is a repeat of my question I posted in the Travel and Adventure gear section. I've been planning to camp in Himachal with my son, who's ~9 years old. This is one of my many ways thought to spend time with my sons (younger one is 6 yrs) and engaging them to perform some basic activities where they could learn travel and survival at an eary age. I myself haven't camped anywhere yet (except for the stay at Banjara Camps, Chitkul, which is a full blown serviced camp).

My questions:

> Is camping a good idea with a kid?? Should one camp only if there's a group of people going??
> Should the camp site be close to habitat (like a site close to roadway/highway) or a secluded place (like the banks of Baspa at Chitkul).
> Are there designated camp sites in Himachal or are they like sight them and gram them kind.
> I read in one of your post that one needs to take permission. Is it necessary for individuals to take permission, even though its not a commercial one? What if one is stranded overnight at a place and has to camp..
> How to identify a camp site and what to look for as signs of a safe camping location.

Please suggest me on some camping sites around Shimla route or Dharamsala Route, which are accessible in a day's drive. I would definitely have a go once I have gathered enough info on such adventures. I will rent out the camp accessories as a first try before really buying into one.

Thanks !!
 
Last edited:

aky

The Himalayan Soul
That's a very great idea to take your kids along with you on camping. No permission is required for camping at most of the places in himachal. Triund is one such place where you can camp with your kids. It's near Mcleodganj. Its a 4hrs trek from Dharamkot and you can camp at night . It's quite safe to take kids along with you on this trek.
 

nikhil2877

Well-Known Member
That's a very great idea to take your kids along with you on camping. No permission is required for camping at most of the places in himachal. Triund is one such place where you can camp with your kids. It's near Mcleodganj. Its a 4hrs trek from Dharamkot and you can camp at night . It's quite safe to take kids along with you on this trek.
Thanks Aky - Tell you what, I am not good with my memory. I did this trek when I was in my first year in Engg and remember the top was a camping ground indeed. Many thanks for re-igniting this memory and surely this will be a good option to begin with and camp overnight there are the top.
 
Top