East By North-East: My Blue Diamond Did It Fast

J.Ravi

Petrol Powered + Diesel Driven
Chennai>Bhubaneswar>Guwahati

The only problem that P Cheetah gave during the entire drive was, its LHS fog lamp bulb got burnt out after crossing Vijayawada. So, we drove to Utkal Automobiles, Bhubaneswar and got it replaced during our stay there as I did not want to take any risk with the foggy weather prevailing in many parts of India during the small hours of the day.

After many sections of bad roads and traffic jams in WB, we managed to arrive at Ginger, Guwahati by evening. The next day, we visited the nearby Nagaland House and got the innerline permit [ILP] issued for both me and wife within 10 minutes after submitting application forms with 2 photos each, Aadhaar copies and ₹ 100. Now, we are all set to drive to Nagaland. O:)
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J.Ravi

Petrol Powered + Diesel Driven
Guwahati>Kohima

After driving 344 km in 9 hours, we reached our hotel in Kohima totally exhausted. We ordered dinner from the room-service and called it a day. The outside temperature was freezing 3 deg C. Thankfully, we had room-heater.

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J.Ravi

Petrol Powered + Diesel Driven
We visited Kohima War Cemetery on 7 Jan 2018 morning.

Kohima War Cemetery is a memorial dedicated to soldiers of the 2nd British Division of the Allied Forces who died in the Second World War at Kohima, the capital of Nagaland, India, in April 1944. The soldiers died on the battleground of Garrison Hill in the tennis court area of the Deputy Commissioner's residence. According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC), which maintains this cemetery among many others in the world, there are 1,420 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War at this cemetery, and a memorial to an additional 917 Hindu and Sikh soldiers who were cremated in accordance with their faith.[1][2][3] The memorial was inaugurated by Field Marshal Sir William Slim, then Commander of the 14th Army in Burma.
In March 1944, the Japanese 15th Army attacked the British troops stationed in Kohima and Imphal in northeast India with intent to prevent an attack on Burma. In the first week of April, the Japanese attacked at Kohima and Imphal via Mizoram from the Indo-Burma border, to destroy the supply bases of the British. They laid siege on the Allied forces stationed at Kohima and also at Imphal.
Reaching Kohima during April 1944, the Japanese 15th Army occupied a strategic location on Garrison Hill and continually attacked a small contingent of the Commonwealth forces, which successfully held their ground until reinforcements were brought in. In the battle at the tennis ground (now marked by white concrete lines) of the Deputy Commissioner's bungalow (which was destroyed during the war), which also involved hand-to-hand fighting between the opposing forces, the Commonwealth forces prevailed over the Japanese forces and forced them to retreat in defeat. There were heavy casualties on both sides.[1] This battle was the turning point for the Allied forces.
In 2013, the British National Army Museum voted the Battle of Imphal and Kohima as "Britain's Greatest Battle".
Source: Kohima War Cemetery - Wikipedia

The Battle of Kohima was the turning point of the Japanese U Go offensive into India in 1944 during the Second World War. The battle was fought in three stages from 4 April to 22 June 1944 around the town of Kohima in Nagaland in northeast India. From 3 to 16 April, the Japanese attempted to capture Kohima ridge, a feature which dominated the road by which the besieged British and Indian troops of IV Corps at Imphal were supplied. By mid-April, the small British and Indian force at Kohima was relieved. From 18 April to 13 May, British and Indian reinforcements counter-attacked to drive the Japanese from the positions they had captured. The Japanese abandoned the ridge at this point but continued to block the Kohima–Imphal road. From 16 May to 22 June, the British and Indian troops pursued the retreating Japanese and reopened the road. The battle ended on 22 June when British and Indian troops from Kohima and Imphal met at Milestone 109, ending the Siege of Imphal.
The battle is often referred to as the "Stalingrad of the East". In 2013, the British National Army Museum voted the Battle of Imphal and Kohima to be "Britain's Greatest Battle".
Source: Battle of Kohima - Wikipedia

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J.Ravi

Petrol Powered + Diesel Driven
Kohima Museum

We visited the Kohima museum on 8 Jan 2018 [Monday] as it was closed on Sundays. It took us to the world of Naga people with good exhibits.

Nagaland /ˈnɑːɡəlænd/ is a state in Northeast India. It borders the state of Assam to the west, Arunachal Pradesh and part of Assamto the north, Burma to the east, and Manipur to the south. The state capital is Kohima, and the largest city is Dimapur. It has an area of 16,579 square kilometres (6,401 sq mi) with a population of 1,980,602 per the 2011 Census of India, making it one of the smallest states of India.[3]

The state is inhabited by 16 tribes — Angami, Ao, Chakhesang, Chang, Kachari, Khiamniungan, Konyak, Kuki, Lotha, Phom, Pochury, Rengma, Sangtam, Sumi, Yimchunger, and Zeme-Liangmai (Zeliang)[4] Each tribe is unique in character with its own distinct customs, language and dress.
Source: Nagaland - Wikipedia
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J.Ravi

Petrol Powered + Diesel Driven
Naga Heritage Village Kisama

We visited the Naga Heritage Village Kisama on 8 Jan 2018, where the Hornbill Festival is held every year during 1 - 10 December.

The state of Nagaland is home to several tribes, which have their own distinct festivals. More than 60% of the population of Nagaland depends on agriculture and therefore most of their festivals revolve around agriculture. The Nagas consider their festivals sacred, so participation in these festivals is essential.

To encourage inter-tribal interaction and to promote cultural heritage of Nagaland, the Government of Nagaland organizes the Hornbill Festival every year in the first week of December. The first festival was held in 2000.

The festival is named after the Indian hornbill, the large and colourful forest bird which is displayed in the folklore of most of the state's tribes.
Source: Hornbill Festival - Wikipedia

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ToughGuy

Active Member
Hi J.Ravi,

Your logs are always a Inspiration for people like us please keep sharing your travel experience. Kudos to both you and your travel partner. Regards,
TG
 

J.Ravi

Petrol Powered + Diesel Driven
P Cheetah Visits Myanmar!

P Cheetah visited Myanmar on 9 Jan 2018 via Moreh.

Moreh is a town located on the India-Myanmar border in the Tengnoupal district of the Indian state of Manipur. The town is mainly inhabited by Kuki tribes and a sizeable number of Tamil, Nepali, Meitei, Punjabi, Telugu, Bihari, Marwari and Muslim Pangals. Moreh plays a very important role in connection with the India-Myanmar relationship and is also a rapidly developing trade point in India on the border with Myanmar, with the city of Tamu on the other side of the border.
Source: Moreh, India - Wikipedia

We reached Moreh before noon and straight away drove to the immigration office, located opposite Moreh police station. Obtaining entry pass to visit Myanmar was very easy and simple. I filled up an application form and submitted along with the Aadhaar card copies and ₹ 100. The officer wrote, signed and stamped the entry pass and gave it me within 5 minutes! Armed with the entry pass, we drove towards the border. At a border check post, they called a passing Tamil youth in his motorcycle and asked him to guide us upto India Myanmar Friendship Road constructed by our BRO. He told us in perfect English, "Please follow me, sir" and continued in his motorcycle. After reaching the border, he started explaining the 'keep right' rule in Myanmar, which I knew already. When he came to know that we were driving all the way from Chennai, he was taken aback! He volunteered to guide us in Myanmar too, but I thanked and told him that we could manage ourselves. A bridge separates India from Myanmar. Indian side of the bridge was painted with silver colour and Myanmar side, golden. So, I drove on the left side of the Indian side of the bridge and switched over to the right side on the Myanmar side of the bridge! After exiting the bridge, I reached Myanmar immigration office on the RHS of the road, where I presented the entry pass with ₹ 140. He wrote a vehicle pass, gave it and told me that I should return the vehicle pass to him before 5 pm Myanmar time, when the gates would get closed. Then, we started exploring Myanmar for the next couple of hours. :)

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J.Ravi

Petrol Powered + Diesel Driven
In Myanmar

In our two earlier visits to the North-East in 2012 and 2015, we were subjected to 'attempted' extortion by gangs of teenage boys and girls in Assam, but we didn't budge. In this visit, we faced extortion only in Manipur. On our way to Moreh, we were stopped by a gang of teenage boys and girls and a boy asked me to 'donate' for their music project! Another fellow affixed a sticker on the windshield. I refused and asked them to remove that damn sticker, which they did without any murmur! I faced the same problem while returning and on the next day on our way to Shillong. :-x

Recently, Tamils of Moreh celebrated Pongal on 14 Jan 2018. Source: Pongal celebrated in India-Myanmar border town of Moreh - The Hindu

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I met the same Tamil youth again at Moreh, who guided me to Lakshmi Hotel - owned by a family from Madurai - on the temple street, where we had dosai. Later, we drove to our hotel at Imphal. We dined at the hotel restaurant and called it a day.
 
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