Frauds - Call or SMS or Online via Olx FB Whtsapp Twitter Social Media etc

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Delhi Police cyber cell busts fake call centre, arrests five persons
ANI | Updated: Dec 21, 2020, 23:22 IST



Representative image


NEW DELHI: The cyber cell of the northwest district of Delhi Police on Sunday busted a fake call centre and arrested five persons who allegedly duped people impersonating as executives of e-commerce companies.
Police recovered eight mobile phones, 10 SIM cards, eight ATM cards and calling data of online shopping websites from the possession of the accused. The fake call centre was operating from Keshav Puram in the capital.
"Accused persons used to fetch data from data providers whose contact numbers are available on Just Dial. They called any data provider and asked them to provide data of the customers who recently made a purchase from online shopping portals.
Data is easily available from data providers at a cost of Rs 2 to 10 per mobile number. After that the accused persons used to call the victims impersonating as executives of online shopping portals such as Amazon, Flipkart, Shopclues.com and others and cite details of the victims from the gathered data to earn their trust. Following this, the accused induced victims with their schemes.
The accused told the victims that on the basis of their last shopping, they were selected as lucky customers who won iron, LED TV, laptop, and car. When the victims got influenced by the freebies offered by the accused, they were asked to deposit a processing fee to deliver the gift items.
The accused also used to give the option to collect cash against the gift item on paying certain processing fee as per the value of the gift items. They provided bank account numbers of fake identity to get the money transferred from the victims.
Once the money was received, they stopped picking up calls from the victims. After using a mobile number and bank account for 15 days, they used to dispose of them and get a new one on fake identity." read an official press release.



 

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Busting phone scammers: Police raids shine light on overseas call centres (Marketplace)
4,155,430 views
•Feb 15, 2020




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CBC News


2.54M subscribers


Marketplace journalists got exclusive access to an undercover RCMP investigation into major scam calls that have bilked Canadians of millions of dollars. For two years, we have zeroed in on scammers in Indian call centres targeting Canadians: posing as CRA tax agents, tech support workers or impersonating police and other government officials. Many of you have come forward with stories of being contacted by these scammers and asked why authorities can’t do more to stop these schemes. We’ve always wondered: Are there accomplices in Canada? To read more: http://cbc.ca/1.5463838 »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: http://bit.ly/1RreYWS Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: http://bit.ly/1Z0m6iX Find CBC News on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1WjG36m Follow CBC News on Twitter:
 

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OLX Fraud In 2021।। BIG SCAM ALERT 2021।। Must Watch
96 views
•Feb 26, 2021


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TRUE PHONE WALA


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Red Mercury is Fraud

Red mercury | Red Mercury in old tv | Black and white tv Red mercury | Red mercury price in india
502,767 views
•Sep 12, 2020



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Samjha Do Bhaiya





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Red Valve or Red Mercury In Old Radio , Television, Telephone ?? is this real ?? ( Hindi ),
Title :- Red mercury | Red Mercury in old tv | Black and white tv Red mercury | Red mercury price in india.
 

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'Red mercury': Why does this strange myth persist?
By BBC Trending
In-depth reporting on social media

Published12 September 2019
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a red blob
IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES
For centuries rumours have persisted about a powerful and mysterious substance. And these days, adverts and videos offering it for sale can be found online. Why has the story of "red mercury" endured?
Some people believe it's a magical healing elixir found buried in the mouths of ancient Egyptian mummies.
Or could it be a powerful nuclear material that might bring about the apocalypse?
Videos on YouTube extol its vampire-like properties. Others claim it can be found in vintage sewing machines or in the nests of bats.
There's one small problem with these tales - the substance doesn't actually exist. Red mercury is a red herring.
The hunt for red mercury
Despite this, you can find it being hawked on social media and on numerous websites. Tiny amounts are sometimes priced at thousands of dollars.

Many of the adverts feature a blurry photo of a globule of red liquid on a dinner plate. Next to it there will often be a phone number scribbled on a piece of paper, for anybody foolish enough to want to contact the seller.
"Serious buyers only," reads one advert. "We need proof of funds to make proof of product."
The impression given is that a mysterious and illicit commodity is on offer.
"It's a game of con artists and the danger is that people are going to be swindled, that they might be robbed or mugged, or that they'll just waste their time," says Lisa Wynn, head of the anthropology department at Macquarie University in Sydney.
Prof Wynn first came across the phenomenon when she was working at the pyramids of Giza in Egypt and sharing an office with the leading Egyptologist Dr Zahi Hawass.
One day Dr Hawass received a visit from a Saudi prince whose mother was in a coma.

"This man had been spending all of his energies and money trying to find something that would save his mother," Prof Wynn recalls.
A man sits with a camel before the pyramids

image captionThe belief that the pyramids contain magical substances is centuries old
"So he turns to a sheikh in Saudi Arabia, a faith healer, who tells him there's this magical substance that is found buried in the throats of mummies in ancient Egypt. And if you go to Egypt and ask this archaeologist, he will be able to provide you with red mercury."
But when the man arrived in Egypt, the archaeologist set him straight.
"Dr Hawass says: 'I'm so sorry about your mother, but this is bunk. There is no such thing as red mercury.'"
After witnessing this exchange, an astonished Prof Wynn discovered this was not a new experience for Dr Hawass and his colleagues. They often encountered Arabs who believed red mercury was a magic cure-all buried with the pharaohs.
It's bats
The origins of this belief are hazy. Evidence of it can be found in the work of the medieval alchemist and philosopher Jabir ibn Hayyan, who wrote: "The most precious elixirs to ever have been blended on earth were hidden in the pyramids."

In more recent times, some seeking red mercury have come to believe it can also be found in the nests of bats. Leave aside the inconvenient fact that bats do not actually build nests - this has not prevented fortune hunters from disturbing habitats to look for it.
Still from a YouTube which shows an optical illusion - a blob of red mercury supposedly not being reflected in a mirror.
IMAGE COPYRIGHTYOUTUBE
image captionA still from a video which claims to show red mercury, like Dracula, has no reflection
Some have taken the bat theory one step further, and claim that red mercury comes from vampire bats. And so, the logic goes, the substance exhibits the same properties as horror movie vampires.
Evidence for this Dracula-in-liquid-form legend is offered in a number of bizarre YouTube videos, some of which have been viewed hundreds of thousands of times. Typically a red blob - that often looks suspiciously like it has been created using video graphics - is shown being repelled by garlic, and attracted by gold. When a mirror is placed beside it, the blob apparently has no reflection.
Red mercury's supposedly amazing qualities don't end there. It is alleged to have powers to summon jinns - Arabic for supernatural beings.
In 2009 a story spread in Saudi Arabia that red mercury could be procured without breaking into an ancient tomb or sifting through bat guano. Small amounts of the prized substance were rumoured to be found inside vintage Singer sewing machines.
Police began investigating the hoax after these very ordinary household objects started changing hands for tens of thousands of dollars.
Woman using a vintage Singer sewing machine in the 1950s
IMAGE COPYRIGHTSCIENCE & SOCIETY PICTURE LIBRARY
image captionShe wasn't sitting on a hidden fortune in red mercury
Red mercury scare
Rumours about the substance have also been given traction by global geopolitics. In the late 1980s, as communist regimes collapsed across Eastern Europe, there was uncertainty as to what was happening to their stockpiles of nuclear material.
At the time, Mark Hibbs was a journalist investigating alarming rumours that a previously unknown nuclear material, created in Soviet laboratories, was being offered for sale by shady individuals. Its name? Red mercury, of course.
Mark, now a senior fellow the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, a US foreign policy think tank, says that the atmosphere of uncertainty at the time contributed to the whispers.
"The Soviet Union was a place that over a number of decades secretly accumulated nuclear inventories across a massive territory," he says. "It wasn't clear to us at the time that all those materials - as the Soviet Union began to disintegrate - would remain under lock and key."
This version of the red mercury story was different from the one about the all-healing elixir buried with the pharaohs. Soviet red mercury was said to be destructive, capable of causing a tremendous nuclear explosion with quantities no larger than a baseball.
The nightmare scenario was that this substance might find its way onto the weapons black market and end up in the hands of terrorists or rogue states.
However, Mark Hibbs says that when Western governments investigated, they concluded that the doomsday material didn't exist.
So how had the rumours started? Mark says Russian scientists told him that red mercury was actually a nickname for a known nuclear isotope. But when he asked the Russian and US governments, neither would confirm nor deny if that story was true.
And a rival theory emerged - that the US government had surreptitiously spread red mercury rumours as a way to entrap terrorists. But again, there was no hard proof or official confirmation.
Not quite red-handed
Since then, however, the rumours have featured in several terror cases. In 2015, the New York Times reported that members of the so-called Islamic State group had been arrested in Turkey attempting to buy red mercury.
And in Britain in 2004, three men were arrested and charged with terrorist offences, again after allegedly trying to buy the substance.
Their trial heard how an undercover reporter, Mazher Mahmood, better known as the News of the World's "fake sheikh", claimed to be hawking nearly a kilogram of red mercury.
The prosecutor, Mark Ellison, told the jury: "The Crown's position is that whether red mercury does or does not exist is irrelevant."
Prosecutors said the three men were looking for ingredients for a "dirty bomb" which could have devastated London. But one of the defendants said he was interested in the liquid to wash discoloured money. All three were acquitted of all charges.
Mazher Mahmood posed as a red mercury dealer


IMAGE COPYRIGHTMETROPOLITAN POLICE
image captionMazher Mahmood, shown here in a police photograph, posed as a red mercury dealer

Despite high-profile cases and debunks, the many fantasies around red mercury have remained stubbornly impervious to reality. And now those YouTube videos and online adverts have spread the hoax to new generations.
YouTube told us that the bizarre videos featuring red globules don't necessarily violate its policies, however it would evaluate on a case-by-case basis whether such videos were suitable for its advertising programme.
Facebook and Twitter said they took a tough stance against fraudulent activity, and they took down the red mercury adverts we pointed out to them.

A lump of red mercury sulphide


IMAGE COPYRIGHTJOEL AREM/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

image captionMercury sulphide, although very red, has no magical properties


The real red mercury
Finally, there is a red-coloured mercury-containing ore which does actually exist. Mercury sulphide, to give it its proper name, is a comparatively mundane substance. It's also known as cinnabar and although it is very useful for decorating pottery, it cures nothing - and could actually be harmful. Not because it's highly explosive, mind you, but rather because plain old mercury is hazardous to human health.
However, if you are still tempted to go online to purchase red mercury for a miracle cure, then can we perhaps also interest you in buying some magic beans?


'Red mercury': Why does this strange myth persist?
 

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Red mercury scam: Five arrested
TNN | Jan 10, 2020, 04:14 IST

Coimbatore:
The Salem city police arrested five people on Thursday for attempting to cheat a group of people by offering to sell red mercury, a substance they said, is used to make nuclear weapons.

Police identified them as Pandiyarajan, 24, from Dindigul district, Ramesh, 30, from Viluppuram district, Kannadasan, 45, from Kotagiri in the Nilgiris, Thangapandian, 44, from Usilampatti in Madurai district and a 15-year-old boy from Nagapattinam. “They had posted messages about red mercury on social media websites. When a man expressed interest to buy it, the gang told him to meet them at a coffee shop in Salem, where they were meeting other prospective buyers. The man informed police about the gang,” a police officer said.Police nabbed them from the shop. “The gang met a group of buyers at the shop and showed them a fake video of red mercury in a mobile phone. They told the buyers that the substance is worth Rs 3 crore. The buyers showed them a video showing currency notes,” the officer said. Police have arrested them on cheating charges. tnn

Red mercury scam: Five arrested | Coimbatore News - Times of India
 

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Punjab: Man nabbed for cheating over 'red mercury' purchase; fraud unearthed in Ropar
Bharat Khanna | TNN | Oct 28, 2020, 21:39 IST


PATIALA: The police in Ropar on Wednesday unearthed a fraud under which the fraudsters used to cheat in the name of purchasing 'Red mercury' which police claimed does not exist in reality. The police revealed that the scam was unearthed after an agent of a Dehradun-based company, that claim to collect antique material, was nabbed.




Punjab: Man nabbed for cheating over ‘red mercury’ purchase; fraud unearthed in Ropar | Chandigarh News - Times of India
 
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