Ladakh Itinerary suggestions - 8n/9D June 2018

Came back today from Ladakh.
Overall, had a wonderful trip except that my 10 year old daughter was hit by AMS in Tso Moriri.
We stayed at Tso Moriri camps and the hospital is just 10 minutes walk but she was shivering so much that we could not think of taking her out.
Fortunately, we were carrying enough oxygen. So, we put her on oxygen 2 times during the night for 30-45 mins.
Surviving that night in such conditions without electricity was an experience I will never forget.
We drove back next morning to Leh and she recovered after reaching Leh.

On hindsight, I should have monitored the oxygen levels more pro-actively.
Since we stayed the previous night at Pangong and none of us had any problems plus my daughter was very active and playful, I did not monitor the oxygen levels in Tso Moriri regularly.
Actually, we all went out in the afternoon for a stroll around the lake and had a great time together.
Sometime in the evening around 7 PM, she started shivering and then she suddenly vomited and also complained of nausea.
When I checked the SPO2 level, it was around 79. If I would have checked earlier, I would have put her on oxygen before.
Anyways, I was not very sure about the thresholds. For example, a gentleman in the same camp was haing SPO2 levels at 77 and he was fine.
Even my levels were arounf 83-84 and I was running around that night when my daughter got struck with AMS.


Me and my wife did not have any issues with AMS. We tried a test dosage of diamox a week before and we felt good. So, we went ahead with a course of diamox 48 hours before reaching Leh.
I did not have any drinks till I reached back to Leh from Tso Moriri (had stopped Diamox that day)
Since Tso Moriri was at the end of our trip, we did not miss anything as such but my family is still cursing me for taking them to such extreme conditions.

I will try to compile a trip report whenever I get time. Took lots of pics, but felt the need for a wide angle lens more than any other trip I have ever done :)
 

Yogesh Sarkar

Administrator
Welcome back.

Anything below 80 is bad. Though doctors will generally keep a patient on oxygen till around 85.

To be honest, it was probably being extra active and running around that really made things worse for her and lack of water could have been a contributing factor as well.

In any case, as long as it wasn’t too serious, it was just an experience and treat this more of a slap on the wrist than something really serious. I am sure your family will vividly recall the experience for a long time to come.

Looking forward to your travelogue :).
 

gkapoor

Super User
Came back today from Ladakh.
Overall, had a wonderful trip except that my 10 year old daughter was hit by AMS in Tso Moriri.
We stayed at Tso Moriri camps and the hospital is just 10 minutes walk but she was shivering so much that we could not think of taking her out.
Fortunately, we were carrying enough oxygen. So, we put her on oxygen 2 times during the night for 30-45 mins.
Surviving that night in such conditions without electricity was an experience I will never forget.
We drove back next morning to Leh and she recovered after reaching Leh.

On hindsight, I should have monitored the oxygen levels more pro-actively.
Since we stayed the previous night at Pangong and none of us had any problems plus my daughter was very active and playful, I did not monitor the oxygen levels in Tso Moriri regularly.
Actually, we all went out in the afternoon for a stroll around the lake and had a great time together.
Sometime in the evening around 7 PM, she started shivering and then she suddenly vomited and also complained of nausea.
When I checked the SPO2 level, it was around 79. If I would have checked earlier, I would have put her on oxygen before.
Anyways, I was not very sure about the thresholds. For example, a gentleman in the same camp was haing SPO2 levels at 77 and he was fine.
Even my levels were arounf 83-84 and I was running around that night when my daughter got struck with AMS.


Me and my wife did not have any issues with AMS. We tried a test dosage of diamox a week before and we felt good. So, we went ahead with a course of diamox 48 hours before reaching Leh.
I did not have any drinks till I reached back to Leh from Tso Moriri (had stopped Diamox that day)
Since Tso Moriri was at the end of our trip, we did not miss anything as such but my family is still cursing me for taking them to such extreme conditions.

I will try to compile a trip report whenever I get time. Took lots of pics, but felt the need for a wide angle lens more than any other trip I have ever done :)
Congrats on completing the first of many trips to the cold desert!

Sad to hear about experience with your daughter but it was in fact due to over exertion during day time. AMS hits like this, one moment you are jumping around and lying on the bed the next moment.
Good that you were prepared with oxygen cylinders, here is where being cautious and prepared helps.
I hope down the line few years later this will just be a small incident in otherwise memorable experience.
 
Thanks, guys.
It was a memorable trip indeed and actually overwhelming, I am still having hangover from it :D

The long and tiring journey from Pangong to Tso Moriri should have been one of the major contributors to AMS.
Also, she had less water during the journey.
Having said that, I should have checked the oxygen levels once I reached Tso Moriri and put her on oxygen.
Anyways, I guess it's always easy to be wise in hindsight.

Though my post above talks a lot about my daughter's AMS, it does not mean we did not enjoy the trip.
We all loved it and it will be remembered for a long long time.
 
Top