Milky Way - Need Help

govigov

beep beep
Do you guys use any filters on the lens while shooting? Is it recommended to shoot without filters and with just the hood?
 

rajput.ankush

Active Member
Do you guys use any filters on the lens while shooting? Is it recommended to shoot without filters and with just the hood?
I think shooting with filters is not recommended at all as all the filters stop light. with filters you'll have to increase the shutter speed for much longer duration and i don't see any use of common filters like UV, polarizer etc in night. They simply won't work.

Don't know if you want to achieve a particular effect with some coloured tinted filters...

Experts can guide better on this..
 
Last edited:

hensil

Guru
People use UV, Skylight filter as protection which I don't agree.
It is worst to use any filter in the night due to flares. I never use them even in day.
The only filter I use (only when necessary) is ND and a CPL.
Hood is very good for protection of lens and to cut down flares.
Henry
 

Pankaj Zarekar

Well-Known Member
Most of the lenses are coated with an protection layer to some extent. However the main job of this layer to avoid flares, reflections. Good lens = Good flare control coating = Good price. We buy such expensive lenses and if we put any such filters (apart those used for specific purpose eg. ND, GND and CPL) we altogether defeat the purpose of coating and thereby money invested in. So avoid any such cheap filters to protect the lens. Always carry lenses on bodies with hoods on.

With the fast lenses at your disposal usually good milkyway shots are at the clear skies with minimum light pollution. However little bit of light pollution can be used to add drama to the frames as well. Ideal exposure time is approx 600/35mm equivalent focal length of the lens. Eg. if you are using 18-55 kit lens at widest 18mm, the effective 35mm equivalent focal length will be 18*crop factor = 24. So the maximum safe shutterspeed to achieve mikyway star in stationery position is 24sec. Anything more than that will case trails of moving stars in the frame. So set the shutterspeeds accordingly and experiment with ISO and apertures in manual mode.

Ladakh milkyway looks like this which is light pollution free zone with ideal clear skies.

IMG_8957 copy.jpg
 

svamshi

Vamshi
Second attempt at star trails - this time with an wide angle.

24mm (35mm equivalent)
30s
f4.0
Interval 33s
277 frames

startrail1.jpg
 

Pankaj Zarekar

Well-Known Member
Second attempt at star trails - this time with an wide angle.

24mm (35mm equivalent)
30s
f4.0
Interval 33s
277 frames

Vamshi, You need to look out for the place which has minimal light pollution i.e. somewhere amongst the mountains or some farmhouse which is at very remote place. Please refer THIS LINK if you are interested to read some pointers.
 

svamshi

Vamshi
Pankaj,
Thanks for the link. I will have a read.

Unfortunately i stay in the most congested part of Bangalore, which is Guaranteed to have dust and light pollution till late midnight, plus i live in a concrete world, so do not have clear open skies from my house.

As you mentioned, i am planning to visit my friend's farm house in the future, till then i am running few experiments to understand the results.
 

zack2137

Leh'd and how!
The trails are pretty clean. Try spotting the Polaris and click with it in the frame. The trails form a circle around the Polaris.
 

ashish0712

TravelForNirvana
Very Informative, Absolutely Amazing Pics from Experts.

I my want to experiment shooting a Star Trail or Milky Way. I will be a Perfect Location for doing the same, although I am not sure if it will be a Perfect Time.

Few Questions - Should one shoot the Milky Way or Star Trail only on Moonless Night?

Do we require an UWA Lens for shooting the same? ( I am currently using Canon 17-40mm F-4 L Lens)?

Few Tips, Just for Practice before the D-Day.


Thanks in Advance !!!
Ashish
 
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