Mintu-Canon600D Beginner Photographer

hensil

Guru
Hi Neeraj,
I went through this thread and saw some of the pictures you have posted, they are quite sharp. Which picture you think is not sharp? Can you post an example?
There are several reason to get unsharp pictures.
Honestly, the pictures I have posted that you linked are very average in my opinion. Thanks for your compliment.
Henry
 

nishchaya

Dreamer
Mintu, following are the basic requirements for getting the sharp images:

1. Ample shutter speed when shooting hand held. As a rule of thumb, you can assume that the shutter speed should be faster than the reciprocal of the focal length at that point in time. Say if you're shooting at 100mm, your shutter speed must be faster than 1/100 sec to avoid blur.

2. In low light conditions, use a tripod. However stable your hands are, shooting anything handheld can cause a blur if the shutter speed is slower than 1/40th of a sec. If the situation doesn't demand, I would never prefer not to shoot anything handheld below 1/40th of a sec.

3. When shooting on tripod, turn the VR off. You can also lock the mirror when shooting on a tripod or use the delay exposure mode (strictly Nikon) that lets the mirror flip first and then opens the shutter.

4. Also, the sharpness is all relative. Say in a portrait, I would want to the eyes to be sharp, but I would prefer the skin to be soft. While in a landscape, I prefer end to end sharpness.

5. Also, the sharpness can be attained in PP. Use unsharp mask and other types of sharpening techniques. ( I am not competent enough to comment on sharpening techniques in PP )

6. Hold your camera firmly or give it some strong support to minimize the movement while you release the shutter. You can also make a death trap grip while holding the camera.
 

Chetan Kulkarni

Super User
Hi All,

I have a query, How to get the sharp images, Whenever i took the images and on computer they are not as much sharp as posted by other persons. What i am doing wrong. Please help me.
Pixel peeping or checking sharpness of an image is a dangerous addiction :) Most of the time we forget the fact that images are taken to convey a story or capture the moment. And at times the sharpest image may not be able to deliver what a blurred image may be able to.

I checked your recent images in the thread and they look great. I think for web display the images are perfect. So don't get too hung up on the sharpness front.
 

mintu

Neeraj Sharma
Here is a pic for referance
IMG_8566.jpg


- - - Updated - - -

Sharpness I mean is, when I am checking the pic as actual size, there is no place which comes out of the pic. I need the pics to be good at actual size too for printing purpose if pic is good.

The Exif of the above image is :-
Dimension of the pic is 3456*5184
F/3.3
1/750sec
ISO-100
18MM

This is a high resolution pic and it must have some part to be sharp as I want this "menar" to be sharped. I want to print out the pic which have all details. Might be in the above pic aperture is too small. I am posting another pic with F/11 and same story with that pic too.

- - - Updated - - -

Here is the second pic
EXIF are:-
F/11
1/180sec
ISO-100
DPP_0002.jpg
 
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hensil

Guru
Neeraj,
When you say actual pixel I guess it means 100% magnification on screen. That is one thing you should never do. At that magnification you are talking of print of A1 size. I have never printed so big ever. I'd suggest for prints of A2 or A3 size do not magnify the image more than 50% on screen to judge for sharpness. For web, just look at fit for screen size, that size is more than enough.
Both your above pictures are sharp at web resolution though the second looks more sharper. One of the reason could be f/3.5 for the first picture. Nischay has mentioned everything that is required for a sharp image, just follow those tips and do not worry too much of sharpness as Chetan said. I am least concern about sharpness of my images unless the blur is very obvious.
Henry
 

Chetan Kulkarni

Super User
I think Henry has given some great views there. I want to especially emphasize on the aperture part. Each lens, even the high end ones, have a range in which they perform well. The kit lens, i.e. 18-55, performs well in the f/7.1 or f/8 aperture zone. It may vary from lens to lens. In order to get an idea of where your lens performs best try some tests in which you mount the camera on a tripod and shoot the same subject at different apertures. You will get a view yourself on where things stand. Also tripod mounting will eliminate any shake.

Secondly, while it may not be an issue by default, do some focus testing as well. At times the focus is a bit off causes images to be not so sharp.

On the printing part, all images need processing for printing and it is different from processing for the web. And it is not restricted to just sharpening but also goes down to color, exposure management to name a few.
 
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oriole12

Nature Lover
Neeraj,
Most of the pictures you have posted above are sharp enough to my eyes. The picture of the dragaonfly is out of focus and that is why it is hazy. I suspect the last picture is also a bit out of focus.
The suggestions made by Henry and Chetan above are very apt. Find the 'sweet spot' of all your lenses and try to use a tripod whenever possible.
 

hensil

Guru
Neeraj,
One important point I noticed in your pictures which had narrow depth of field. The point of focus is not on the subject. This is very critical when shooting wide open. What focusing system/points are you using? The best for landscape is to shooting Single Shot-Center Focus Point and focus recompose method. When shooting macro or portraits (narrow dof) use the relevant focusing point that coincides with the subject in the frame. Even a little camera movement before click will render your subject out of focus due to narrow dof.
Henry
 
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