My Journey to Nepal

Khagesh

Well-Known Member
EPILOGUE

This trip, as I mentioned initially, is not just my effort. There are many people who made this trip possible and for privacy sake I do not mention their names. I thank all of them by individual names. Above all, it’s the will of God without which it would not have taken off at all. Its all these people and most importantly I thank my bike which never missed a single beat in those horrible roads. Never had even a single puncture. We both came home safely. I was harsh on it on that slushy rainy day on the way to Muktinath. But otherwise the steep inclines on Hetauda route, it took it easy. I did go in first gear, but not while climbing up but while climbing down for better maneuverability.

What actually I aimed was to be in Himalayas and possibly a dip in Damodar Kunda in upper Mustang area past Muktinath. Knew that was expensive entry fees. Wanted to try some other means. But nothing worked. I know people even crossed over to China border to Mt. Kailash area illegally.

Then comes EBC. I had an open mind on this. I just wanted to be in that area and see the Saagarmaatha which I did. But once there I want to do more and more. Had I known a 47 existed on oximeter, I would have definitely risked and had done even three passes and Gokyo too along with Kalapathar. But I came to know only after my return.

I don’t mean others take this example. Follow your own safety measures on oxygen levels and your instincts and your endurance.

In all the total 5,697 Kms I did on this trip. Faced all sorts of roads to no roads at all in that river bed on the way Pokhara – Muktinath in Nepal. Surprisingly, the super highways with four track, toll roads. I felt really quite boring and not practical for a two wheeler in those scorching heat. No shade at all. They are just meant to commute and transportation or meant for some expensive cars and so on. Not for a trip like this.

The time of the trip is totally wrong but I had no choice. In India I faced extreme hot conditions and one can imagine a two wheeler drive in that scorching heat. Other option was night drive. On super highways that’s ok but nearly 60% of roads were under widening process and the conditions were horrible for a night drive with that sole little headlight what I had on my bike. So that’s ruled out. I did night driving several times during the trip though. But not worth the risk. Plus what would I see if I do the night drive. Not that I am scared of night. It reminds me of passing those jungles and Banti Dhaba on my Leh trip.

Then comes Nepal. Muktinath area rains have already begun. Wrong time for a two wheeler drive. All slush in those inclines. No matter what gear you are in, no matter if both the brakes applied the bike would skid the way the slush takes and its really scary when the skid is out of control at those steep edges. Moreover, its not fun to drive in rain, slush, off roads, great altitudes and cold all at the same. What views one would have in those conditions excepting the fog everywhere including on our helmet visor.

Then EBC area. During this time of the year, either it rains, or its all hazy. Only till afternoon one could expect good weather. Then the coulds would come up obliterating all views. Views fine, but in case of emergencies who depend on heli rescue, no helicopter would fly in those weather conditions. Literally none. Even the flights would get cancelled and I have seen passengers struck for several days at Lukla and had to charter a helicopter to Kathmandu lest they miss their international flight.

So, choose your time. I know best time would be October like I did my Leh trip.

Next comes pace of the trip. I never pushed to do more kilometers nor fixed a destination excepting from Kolkatta onwards. This because I was in a hurry to hit home. But the conditions are such we somehow get victimized to the temptation of reaching our destination of that particular day. Only if I could wait another day, and only if it didn’t rain that heavy that night at Goleswor. So many ‘if’s.

Health; if you are reasonably well, one can do this trip easily. Well, in my case, that food poisoning really took its toll and I still feel the tender stomach. Taste buds literally died and curiously no wish for water either. Otherwise I drink lot of water daily in my day to day life. It is difficult to choose the place of eating especially when driving because the temptation of taking the closest choice without much deviation is too great. Food poisoning and continuous dhaba food, and the extreme heat is the perfect recipe to ill health. At no point of time I felt tired and craved for a rest day. The system itself is put into gear and would stop only after the trip is over. Those three days at Mau, I really was drained and had to climb the strairs to reach my room with the help of grills. When decided to continue my journey towards Gorakhpur and then on to Nepal, all my spirits were complaining. What made me push myself I do not know. Same thing happened when approaching Himalayas of Nepal, said to myself, oh no.. once more these hills, but the inner traveler was just too happy and he won luckily.

The Drive: I had minimum maintenance work on the bike before the start of the trip. Just general cleaning of carburetor, air cleaner, jets, electrical, replacing all control cables, chain tightening and oil change. At one stage I thought of going for tubeless tire for that dreadful road of Muktinath but by the grace of God, nothing happened. I used the stock tyre. Now, what I leant from the two trips into Himalayas is best way to drive is never to hurry one thing and secondly don’t strain the bike. One would know when the bike isn’t liking the drive anymore. Just stop. Then apply brakes and clutch when its absolutely necessary. Manage with gear and throttle combination. It works very well and absolutely safe. In the hot plains the engine was getting so hot, really so hot but on experience you would know the endurance of the bike. I don’t have a CHT on my bike, yet, one could feel it. Any slightest protest from the engine, just stop. Let her breathe, it has to take you home safely, don’t forget that. Never to be nervous in difficult situations like extreme inclination of road, slush, lonely, forest or whatever the reason. Its going to be alirght at the end. And without a difficulty nothing is going to be achieved.

At the end; one can do this trip. Even could be extended provided that you have enough money for example 500 dollars permit for upper Mustand and more money in EBC area. One could even drive upto Jiri or Shivalaya and to avoid that expensive Lukla flight unless you fancy flying into the third most dangerous airport. But, tell you, you are a mere passenger, you are not a pilot. What a boring thing that it is. But this means two days of drive to and fro Kathmandu and four days extra trek. Monetaraliy it would come to the flight cost only I think. If you ask me, next time, I prefer driving and avoid Lukla flight altogether. More time to spend in Himalayas that way.

If any questions from any of the readers to help doing any sector of this trip, I can answer depending upon my experience and perception.

That’s the end of this travelogue.

PS: News of my trip came in the local telugu news paper. Here is the clipping.
sakshi.jpg
 

adsatinder

explorer
You chose to drive in scorching Heat !
People do this with Moist Cloth on face and body !
This is only way to be on a 2 wheeler !


47 °C temperature is in under shade only.
Imagine
In direct sun, temperature is more certainly due to regular Solar Radiation.

Under a tree shade, solar radiation is absent &
environment is little humid and you feel better.
When you pass a park full of trees near by road
you feel cool at that place.
 

adsatinder

explorer
How to Measure the Outdoor Temperature
By Henrietta Padgett; Updated April 24, 2017



Measuring the temperature outdoors is one of the most basic aspects of weather observation. The outdoor temperature can affect many things about your day; it can even determine whether you'll spend your day indoors or out. Having a thermometer outside can also help determine when plants should be covered or brought inside in the winter. Thermometers are simple to use and come in a wide range of prices, with the more expensive ones offering more functions than simple temperature reading.

Purchase a thermometer. Depending on the price you want to spend, you can get a simple thermometer or a "weather station" that will tell you various other aspects of the weather (such as wind speed, rainfall amount, and humidity and barometer readings). Some digital thermometers have a remote display that allows you to read the outside temperature from the comfort of inside your home.

Choose a place outside for your thermometer. For accurate temperature readings, this should be a place that doesn't get direct sunlight but is not in complete shade, since both of those locations can cause an inaccurate temperature readout. Also try to keep the thermometer away from things like concrete, outdoor vents and anywhere snow builds up in wintertime.

Hang or install your thermometer according to the thermometer's instructions.

Read your thermometer according to the instructions included with it. If it's a simple thermometer, it will probably have a glass rod with a bit of "mercury" that extends up to the current temperature. A digital thermometer will give you an easy-to-read temperature display.


How to Measure the Outdoor Temperature
 

adsatinder

explorer
Sun vs. Shade Temperature






Weather
Sun vs. Shade Temperature
By: Sharon Ray
Posted: June 08, 2017 10:36 PM CDT

Updated: June 08, 2017 10:36 PM CDT





Sun vs Shade_10-15degrees.png



We often look for shady spots during hot summer days for relief from the scorching sun. But did you know that shade doesn't make temperatures cooler. In fact, air temperature is actually the same in the sun or shade. It's solar radiation hitting our bodies which makes it feel hotter. On average, solar radiation makes the air feel 10-15 degrees warmer than it actually is.

This is why official air temperature is always measured in the shade. If the thermometer were placed in the sun, the solar radiation would heat up the thermometer and the resulting temperature would be measuring the warmed up thermometer and not the air around the thermometer.

Other factors that can affect temperature readings are placement of thermometers. Paved surfaces give off heat from absorbed solar radiation and will cause temperatures to be hotter so it's best to place thermometers over grassy surfaces. Also, good air flow is needed to get an accurate air temperature reading. Placing the thermometer 4 to 6 feet above the ground will prevent ambient ground temperature from affecting the reading.


Sun vs. Shade Temperature
 

adsatinder

explorer
Day 38: 29th May, 2018 Tuesday

Eluru - Lingampet, my home 422 Kms

Got up early, today I want to reach home somehow whatever the time it is. I know I would be passing through the hottest part of trip today. Plus this heat is taking its toll on my health.

Couldn’t touch even 40 Kms speed for the heat wave was such that my fingers started burning. And plenty of stops. Just after ten mins drive a break.

This last day is really the very toughest of all my trip’s drive. Did not face this much problem on the way to Muktinath nor that steep shortcut from Kathmandu to Raxaul.

I could see the milestone Miryalaguda is just 35 kms and trust me, it took me an eternity to reach here. It was noon, forced some lunch and I was wondering how people live in such hot conditions. All the life on the road goes on as if nothing is happening. For me, just returning from EBC area is just too much. They say its 47 degrees. I very well can believe that.

Bit of confusion of the roads and little bit of deviation, found the way to Devarakonda. Till here the roads are reasonably ok. And the sun is about to set. I still have to cover that little distance.




 

Khagesh

Well-Known Member
You chose to drive in scorching Heat !
People do this with Moist Cloth on face and body !
This is only way to be on a 2 wheeler !


47 °C temperature is in under shade only.
Imagine
In direct sun, temperature is more certainly due to regular Solar Radiation.

Under a tree shade, solar radiation is absent &
environment is little humid and you feel better.
When you pass a park full of trees near by road
you feel cool at that place.
No, it was not my choice to drive in the scorching heat. That was the only option that was available to me. Such a long absence wouldnt be possible excepting in summer holidays. Otherwise I would have preferred in October.

Moist cloth, though I did use. Its just useless and not advisable either. Useless because within 10 minutes the cloth would be dry anyway in that heat and the drive. Only the cloth under the helmet would stand another 15 mins maximum.

Then, a wet cloth in hot sun, though temporarily gives respite on a long run we catch fever. Sure of that. What I found was to have different layers of cloths to give something like 'fin' effect, just like on cylinder heads of our air cooled engines. Dont we see arabs in deserts, thats the best in my opinion.

Definitely vegetation makes it cooler but most of the roads are in widening process and all the trees are cut. Especially those modern roads with four lanes and sometimes six lane roads, literally no tree at all. If any tree comes into view, the only way to reach is we have to cross a big trench which is ever present all along the road. Then, how to do that? Leave the bike in the sun and manage to go under the tree. I wouldnt prefer to leave my bike in the Sun and go for shade. Also this process involves a lot of time consumption.

Direct sun was really so harsh. It was burning my fingers on the handle bars. I was afraid that I might face sun stroke even worse faint while in drive. Luckily nothing happened like that. Had to take too many brakes especially on that last day of my journey. Just too many, trust me.
 

Khagesh

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the videos Satinderji.

As you must, by now, be aware that I was associated with flying, weather is a major role in learning. Then I personally love the subject weather. Then again I teach Geography at a high school apart from English for my living.

Now, an English teacher with so many grammatical mistakes in your travelogue is the question. My answer is I just didn't give a damn to it, most of the time my heart was typing. Most of the time I use simple present tense which is quite common in narratives.

So, there we go. Thank you once again.
 

Prabhaker

Active Member
Hi Khagesh,

Thank you for intimating me about this new travelogue of yours. And that also prompted me to visit and read the entire t'logue at one go.

You know, as I was reading it, I was just trying to calculate as how much time I have spent trekking/mountaineering. And it came to over 40 years of surviving, even with lots of injuries. Within my circles I am considered to be a reasonably crazy person, but in front of your craziness, I think I stand no where. Honestly, I don't know if I should salute you for your mad determination or call you a jerk for ignoring or breaking basic rules of safety.

I know, I am not your Dad to find faults with your style, but I remember telling you earlier too (Leh trip) that you need to slow down and enjoy the trip, instead of just rushing through everything at lightening speeds, even by putting yourself in mortal danger.

But then, that is what you are and that crazy streak in you is what makes you unique.

I am glad to know you as a friend, but honestly, I will never ride or trek with you, even if is doing the EBC via the lakes and passes route. Of course, I plan to do it soon enough.

Anyways, I loved reading about your hurried experiences of this trip and just hope that you choose to do your next trip a bit slower and not put your health at risk in any manner.

All the best my friend :)
 
Top