Night photography help

Ankur003

UltraWideLife.com
@ThePilgrim Since you did not see much with naked eyes, I expect there was very low light.
No camera will illuminate the dark scene as is the case in above picture.
I am not sure about what picture you are referring to in "Long exposure" thread, but if you observe closely you will notice some well lit subject.
Try clicking at the time of/after sunset, while there is still some ambient light in sky.
Did you use Long exposure Noise reduction feature of your camera?

As a general note, ISO is not so bad thing. Feel free to bump up ISO to 400-800-1600 on need basis.
 

ThePilgrim

Well-Known Member
Okies, so you want to say that this amount of noise "will be there" in long duration shots taken during much darkness, correct?
As for noise reduction feature, nops, I didn't use that for this shot as I wanted to understand best basic settings/practices to follow as is.

It is just that instead of hurrying up to take great photos using available features, I am trying to gradually learn the basics as much as I can and make sure that I have strong foundation.

I'll tonight try the same shot with tad higher ISO and hence reduced exposure time to see is that gives any better result. Thanks for the tip. I hope it will help me find "sweet range" of my camera, if there is any such thing.

Thanks again for help @Ankur003 .
 

ThePilgrim

Well-Known Member
Did you use the 'Long exposure noise reduction'(black frame subtract)? At 30s any camera without Long exposure noise reduction will show noise.
Nops, I turned Long Exposure Noise Reduction off for this shot, as I wanted to understand exposure/ISO implications on noise as is. Your generalized statement in post above gives me some confidence that probably am not doing many things incorrect and it is time to now move to dark-frame subtraction and PP. Thanks again for help.

Cheers
 

hensil

Guru
Nops, I turned Long Exposure Noise Reduction off for this shot, as I wanted to understand exposure/ISO implications on noise as is. Your generalized statement in post above gives me some confidence that probably am not doing many things incorrect and it is time to now move to dark-frame subtraction and PP. Thanks again for help.

Cheers
The sensor generates two types of noise, one is the high ISO and the other is the heat due to long exposure. If you turn ON the Long exposure noise reduction the camera will immediately shoot a black frame after the long exposure of exactly the same duration. This is the best method to reduce the noise generated by the sensor albeit at the expense of the black frame.
Henry
 

SilentSoul

Well-Known Member

Hi I tried to capture the super moon today with my Nikon D-5300 but the results were devastating... what I got is a ball of white light (not the usual moon foto with marks and trenches, which even a p&s camera will do )

DSC_0225-1.jpg


EXIF for this is 140 mm 0.5 sec, f/6.5 iso 400... i tried different sets of EXIF but result was always same... I also tried manual focus and off vibration mode.. different ISO but no effect...

where is the mistake ??

hensil & other friends.. pls help
 

nadz11.ns

Super User
Hi I tried to capture the super moon today with my Nikon D-5300 but the results were devastating... what I got is a ball of white light (not the usual moon foto with marks and trenches, which even a p&s camera will do )

View attachment 697512

EXIF for this is 140 mm 0.5 sec, f/6.5 iso 400... i tried different sets of EXIF but result was always same... I also tried manual focus and off vibration mode.. different ISO but no effect...

where is the mistake ??

hensil & other friends.. pls help
I got the same result :-#:Hangman:
 
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