Rain-marred Rambling in Eastern Arunachal - Hunli, Namdapha, Parashuram Kund, Nampong

mousourik

Who Am I
Day 4 : March 7, 2018 – Deban to Miao

We looked for the first daylight through the innumerable small holes on the wall of the hut, and went out to check the weather. It was still overcast, the wind was blowing at times with the sound of a storm, and it seemed that it might rain any time. The caretaker, Anil Gogoi, said that the only problem we might face is crossing the river before the gate, as water level might increase because of the rain. We had the hut booked for another day, but decided to start for Miao as we did not want to get stuck at Deban.

After having morning tea, we left Deban at around 7am.

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The left diversion is for Deban, while the right one has gone towards Vijaynagar.

This time we took some photos of the Noa-Dihing river.

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The Deban-Miao road

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The brook was full of leeches. In fact, Namdapha is infamous for them.

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On the previous day, we had come along a road on a lower elevation. But we checked with some labours working inside the forest, and they confirmed that the upper road was drivable. This road offered us some good views of the river and a tiny hamlet below.

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School time!
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Then came the river where there was no bridge and the only option was to drive on the bed. Fortunately, the water level was not so high.

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We came from the jungle on the other side, where the road is virtually non-existent.

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We reached the forest gate and had a sigh of relief, although, at the same time, we were morose as the tour so far had gone topsy-turvy.

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The kids were alarmed as they did not want to get wet with splash of water.

We reached Miao and found that the ropeway over the river had not been functioning for the last couple of years. Our next plan was to drive towards Namsai. But instead of the conventional routes, we got in the mood of exploring a new one.
 

mousourik

Who Am I
Day 4 continued –Miao to Namsai : Discovery of a new road

While coming from Namchik gate on the previous day, we saw a transverse road before entering Kharsang. We checked about this road at Deban, and also at the auto-rickshaw stand at Kharsang. We received positive input that this road has gone to Namsai and that there is no need to cross the river by ferry any more. As we reached that junction, we decided to give it a try and turned right towards Balinong, although Google map showed a very thin line.

In reality, this turned out to be an excellent road. It is newly built, not even tarred on a long stretch. But despite that, it is easily driveable.

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The new road is marked in red.

We cruised along very nicely, reached the Tinsukia-Namsai road, took a right turn for the bridge over the Noa-Dihing river.

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Soon we reached Namsai town, which is the district headquarter also. From the crossing where we took the new road, the distance to Namsai was 46 km! From Miao, it took us approximately two hours to reach Namsai, which included the driving time on the pathetic road from Miao beyond Kharsang. This was really unbelievable.

We checked in the hotel above the Alka restaurant at the bus stand.
 
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EnglishAugust

a disguised dancer
Elsewhere on the internet, somebody wants to go to the North East in August (ie middle of monsoons), and was asking for tips online. Judging by your own experiences, mousourik, that seems a tiny bit foolhardy. But was your recent rain-soaked experience typical for this time of year ? (The weather has gone crazy here in Europe, with snow in London and Paris over Easter.)
 
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