Royal Enfield Himalayan - Ownership experience

Ironaddict

Ironaddict
I recently bought the new Royal Enfield Himalayan. This is a very brief review of the bike after completing 1000kms.

I had been happily riding my Thunderbird for the past 6 years, which took me to various places including Ladakh. However, the machine had gotten old after 80K kms of riding and I was looking for something new.

When the rumors about Himalayan started making the rounds, I got excited and was eagerly awaiting the new offering from Enfield stable. I took the test ride on the first day it was unveiled and I had made my decision. But, I decided to wait for a couple of months as I thought it was wise to get some more information on the bike including some user reviews. I did book it finally after seeing all the good reviews from the media and first hand information from my friend who was already owning one. I got the delivery after a waiting period of almost 3 months.

Now, I have ridden it for 1000 kms, most of it on the potholed roads of Mumbai and some highway riding to outskirts of Mumbai and here's what I have to say

Initial impression - The bike is a totally new with no resemblance whatsoever to any previous RE model. It has a different DNA. The fit and finish has improved and the instrument cluster is modern with a plethora of features. For me, the useful features are the twin trip meters and clock. Additionally, there is gear indicator, temperature indicator and a compass which I personally have not looked at much.

Positives - The ride quality, suspension setup and handling are really good. The bike is heavy, but you wont feel the weight while riding. Engine is smooth (the smoothest that I have seen in a Royal Enfield) and is happy to rev up. Brakes have good feel and inspire confidence. The tyres have good grip on all sorts of roads. Seat cushioning is adequate and you get proper support at the right areas. Riding posture is upright. Although I am not a high speed rider, I believe the bike is capable of cruising at around 90kph or even 100kph for long durations. I usually prefer to ride at 80-90 on good open roads occassionally going into the three digit zone. This, the bike can deliver and I am happy for that. The bike comes with a luggage carrier as standard. Plus there is a frame enveloping the fuel tank where you can attach luggage or jerry cans. Also, there are mounting features to mount the Aluminum panniers that come as RE accessories (Not available in showrooms yet). So, there is lot of space for luggage on the bike.

Some concerns - The clutch has a heavy feel and the gear shift is quite hard. Especially while upshifting, you need considerable force. I had reported this issue during the first servicing, but the service person informed me that this is how it is. He adjusted the clutch setting though to improve it marginally. But then, I got used to it and now, it is not annoying anymore. I can ride the bike in city with lots of gearshifts through traffic with ease. The exhaust does backfire sometimes especially when you release the accelerator after revving the engine to higher RPMs. I suppose this will get ironed out as I ride more. The seat height is 800mm which may be a bit high for shorter riders.

Overall, I think the bike is capable of delivering what it has been built for - Touring and Off-roading.

View attachment 690553
1st if all Congratulations.
Well what about the rocker arms noise ??
Recently royal Enfield has recall some of Himalayan for hard gear and rocker arm noise . (Assuming you aware of it)
 

katrenikhil

Member
1st if all Congratulations.
Well what about the rocker arms noise ??
Recently royal Enfield has recall some of Himalayan for hard gear and rocker arm noise . (Assuming you aware of it)
I am aware of the recall about the tappet noise and asked the service center about the same. The service person looked at the chasis no. of my bike and said that my bike is already fitted with the revised version of the tappet (or whatever )mechanism. The noise is there but not that evident. I am observing all the points and am going to report it to the service center during 2nd service. Hard gears needs some time to get used to. Definitely the gears are hard compared to other bikes. Again, the service person told me that the earlier bikes had much harder gears than mine. I also had noticed the test ride bikes had much harder gears than my bike especially when shifting from 1st to 2nd gear.

One issue that still remains unsorted is the back-firing of the exhaust even after about 1800kms of riding.

Also, I have not been able to get great fuel efficiency as yet. I am getting about 28kmpl in mixed (70% city and 30% highway) conditions. My TB 350, during its golden days would give me 43kmpl consistently.
I would appreciate if any Himalayan owner can give some tips about improving fuel efficiency.
 

Ironaddict

Ironaddict
I am aware of the recall about the tappet noise and asked the service center about the same. The service person looked at the chasis no. of my bike and said that my bike is already fitted with the revised version of the tappet (or whatever )mechanism. The noise is there but not that evident. I am observing all the points and am going to report it to the service center during 2nd service. Hard gears needs some time to get used to. Definitely the gears are hard compared to other bikes. Again, the service person told me that the earlier bikes had much harder gears than mine. I also had noticed the test ride bikes had much harder gears than my bike especially when shifting from 1st to 2nd gear.

One issue that still remains unsorted is the back-firing of the exhaust even after about 1800kms of riding.

Also, I have not been able to get great fuel efficiency as yet. I am getting about 28kmpl in mixed (70% city and 30% highway) conditions. My TB 350, during its golden days would give me 43kmpl consistently.
I would appreciate if any Himalayan owner can give some tips about improving fuel efficiency.
Don't worry about the fuel economy I guess your carb is on richer side (rich mixture) its easy fix. recently I went to re service centre near my Area (unison motors borivali west ) to check out the live reviews from the owners itself regarding Himalayan .. mostly all were complaining about 5 issues, 1st tappet noise ,2nd oil leaks from either side of engine casing ,3rd fork stem bearing noise ,4th hard gear and 5th speedo console failure ( in few cases) . So far what I have understood about this bike is 90% of all the Himalayas are not assembled properly directly from company itself, I am More worried about the engine harshness which is tomuch once you cross 5000km's . I would suggest you if you are not satisfied with the service centre do try and visit union motor's in borivali, there is one young guy who is head of service department over here ,I was very impress with his technical knowledge and he is one of the few employee who has received a special Training by Royal Enfield specially for Himalayan.
 

Gaurav Chopra

zestbiker-if there is a SPIRIT,I ride it
I am aware of the recall about the tappet noise and asked the service center about the same. The service person looked at the chasis no. of my bike and said that my bike is already fitted with the revised version of the tappet (or whatever )mechanism. The noise is there but not that evident. I am observing all the points and am going to report it to the service center during 2nd service. Hard gears needs some time to get used to. Definitely the gears are hard compared to other bikes. Again, the service person told me that the earlier bikes had much harder gears than mine. I also had noticed the test ride bikes had much harder gears than my bike especially when shifting from 1st to 2nd gear.

One issue that still remains unsorted is the back-firing of the exhaust even after about 1800kms of riding.

Also, I have not been able to get great fuel efficiency as yet. I am getting about 28kmpl in mixed (70% city and 30% highway) conditions. My TB 350, during its golden days would give me 43kmpl consistently.
I would appreciate if any Himalayan owner can give some tips about improving fuel efficiency.
The main jet of the Himalayan carb is 125-change it to 120 (or 115) and you will be getting 35+kmpl with crisp throttle response and lesser popping from the exhaust.
 

Gaurav Chopra

zestbiker-if there is a SPIRIT,I ride it
Just got to know that the Std500 and the Himalayan are running the same UCD33 carb-so with 20% less engine capacity,the Himalayan is bound to run richer-RC is just being logical in downsizing to 120jet

If there is a SPIRIT,I RIDE it
 

Mandar_C500

Well-Known Member
Just got to know that the Std500 and the Himalayan are running the same UCD33 carb-so with 20% less engine capacity,the Himalayan is bound to run richer-RC is just being logical in downsizing to 120jet

If there is a SPIRIT,I RIDE it
TO add to surprise,
LB500 used to have BS29 and STD 500 (CI) with VM 28. I know VM and BS series cannot be compared, however size of carb does matter.
 

Gaurav Chopra

zestbiker-if there is a SPIRIT,I ride it
TO add to surprise,
LB500 used to have BS29 and STD 500 (CI) with VM 28. I know VM and BS series cannot be compared, however size of carb does matter.
Lolzzzzz,VM28 and UCD33-5mm difference in venturi size and the bullet user's who gave me the statement equating 500 n Himalayan carbs themselves are confused-whom to believe n whom not to

If there is a SPIRIT,I RIDE it
 
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