The future is electric?

adsatinder

explorer
They (IT Cell) are spreading Rumours on Social Media like this to push EV Segment ahead :


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New Tata Evision Electric Car. No fuel required. Only one charge it can run 1000 kms. 10 yrs battery warranty from Tata. ₹ 25 lacs ex showroom price. Launch SEP 2019. Will be a game changer !

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adsatinder

explorer
They (IT Cell) are spreading Rumours on Social Media like this to push EV Segment ahead :

New Tata Evision Electric Car. No fuel required. Only one charge it can run 1000 kms. 10 yrs battery warranty from Tata. ₹ 25 lacs ex showroom price. Launch SEP 2019. Will be a game changer !
Reaction of such news on Social Media :

A : Looks good but how the EVs will fare on water logged roads is the big Q in my mind.
B : If Tatas are building this car then they must've designed for such situation

C : Seriously this can be a game changer.. 1000 km with one charge is too good to be true in present scenario
D : But if its the true then i am tempted to get one.. this also looks dapper



E : The truth about Tata EVision electric sedan: Don’t believe everything you read on WhatsApp, Facebook

Fake news unfortunately ☹☹

F : haha.. seriously.. but if this happens then it would be doomsday for the fossil fuel cars
K : That's not happening anytime soon. ICE based cars start at 2-3L, EVs currently start at 10L. Then infra for charging is non existent. Further going backwards the resources required to manufacture the batteries is huge and last but not the least pollution from manufacturing and then disposing the batteries will stop this from becoming a mass market phenomenon.
 

adsatinder

explorer
They (IT Cell) are spreading Rumours on Social Media like this to push EV Segment ahead :

New Tata Evision Electric Car. No fuel required. Only one charge it can run 1000 kms. 10 yrs battery warranty from Tata. ₹ 25 lacs ex showroom price. Launch SEP 2019. Will be a game changer !
The truth about Tata EVision electric sedan: Don’t believe everything you read on WhatsApp, Facebook

Tata EVision concept electric car: The car still remains to be a concept car and will not be launched in India in September 2018. Know the truth.

By: Ronak Shah | Published: July 10, 2018 3:22 PM



electric car by Tata, tata electric car


Tata EVision


Countering fake news is a challenge and with the rise of digital India, there has also been a constant increase in factually incorrect news that not just spreads rumours but creates an unhealthy environment for upcoming products and consumer expectations from them. Facebook posts, WhatsApp forwards and unverified news is becoming hard to battle and even tech giants like Google, Facebook and Twitter are constantly working to develop its algorithms to reduce the circulation of fake news but there has been a little success with it. Numerous people around the world find new ways daily to circulate fake news in a way that appears to be true.
Automakers too haven't been spared from the circulation of such news, right from Maruti Suzuki to Tata Motors. Many companies have faced rumours and some of these are lofty claims giving positive publicity to the company but giving a wrong perspective to potential consumers. On many occasions, companies have clarified the truth on public platforms and the most recent case involves the Tata EVision concept.
Some widespread social media posts claim that the Tata EVision electric car requires no fuel and can run for 1000 kms in a single charge and Tata Motors is also offering a 10 years batter warranty. Wait, there is more, 'Tata Motors EVision Sedan is priced at Rs 25 lakh (Ex-Showroom) and will be launched in September 2019 and will be a game changer.'
This is totally wrong information about the Tata's concept sedan and has been shared widely on WhatsApp and multiple social media platform with its pictures and videos. The only thing that we can testify as a truth is that if and when a car based on this concept model is launched, it could be a potential game-changer in the Indian automotive industry.

Also read: Tata EVision sedan might not be what it looks like and can Tata really sell such a car?

On the above information or rumour, Suresh Rangarajan, Head of Corporate Communications at Tata Motors, on a Linkedin post said "fake news that has been travelling far and wide - no such announcements made by the company. Someone’s imagination running wild."

Tata EVision concept electric car was showcased at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show and still remains a concept car with no official announcement about its production future. The EVision sedan is based on the Tata's new modular OMEGA platform and with this concept the company did make a bold statement that it is now ready to take on the EV race that has been the talk globally. Building such concept cars is also a learning for carmakers on what is feasible to make it to production and how to go about the product development and the amount of investment needed to start the production. Public feedback to is a critical data collection for carmakers through such concepts.

Over the last few years, we have seen Tata Motors being aggressive in rolling out new products and with just one exception of Tata RaceMo, we saw the Tata Tigor (Kite 5 concept) and the Nexon SUV being launched in the market rather quickly. So now based on this argument we can speculate that the future of Tata EVision sedan might be more than just a concept car and might see production in some form.

The other fact is only 9 of 20 cars showcased by Tata Motors at Geneva Motors Show have made it to production in the last 20 years. The idea of a concept car for a company is to showcase its future design philosophy and future technology being developed by the company. However, it is not possible for every concept car to see a production future. Clearly, no company wants its concept car to be associated with any sorts of fake news or spread wrong information about the product or the company. Concept cars serve the purpose of showcasing a company's direction in areas such as design, powertrain, aerodynamics and more and not specifically hint at production-worthy models.


The truth about Tata EVision electric sedan: Don’t believe everything you read on WhatsApp, Facebook
 

Big Daddy

Super User
American Automobile Association (AAA) recently did research and found that unless consumers see charging stations everywhere they go, they will not buy EVs (in America). No one wants to think: Where will I charge this thing when they buy an EV. Even when these charging stations are everywhere, America will still have 50% of cars running on fossil fuels by the year 2040. I think this is still an optimistic scenario. Fully automated vehicles are not coming for next 25 years. EVs only make sense when they charge themselves up.

The electric car revolution is coming. This is what has to happen first
 

adsatinder

explorer
Here is one of the first electric cars built 110 years ago.


More history on electric cars is here.

Electric cars have been around since before the US Civil War

Electric cars have been around since before the US Civil War
By Peter Valdes-Dapena and Ivory Sherman, CNN Business
Published July 18, 2019



Electric cars have existed since at least 1834, long before gasoline cars were invented. Since the beginning, they have faced the same hurdles they do today: limited driving range and a lack of charging infrastructure. But things are changing fast.

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1834

The first electric motor
The first electric motor

Alamy
Thomas Davenport of Vermont builds the first useful electric motor. Other inventors, including Michael Faraday, have previously built small devices that move using electricity, but Davenport’s are the first with the power to do actual work. He reportedly uses one of his new motors to power a small carriage.

1859

First batteries
First batteries

UIG/Getty Images
French physicist Gaston Planté invents the lead-acid battery. Other scientists, including Planté himself, will improve on the invention in the decades to come.

1884

The first viable electric car
The first viable electric car

Obtained by CNN
Famed English inventor Thomas Parker -- called the “The Edison of Europe” -- creates the first commercially viable electric car. Unlike many of Parker’s other inventions, such as electric trams, underground lighting and a smokeless fuel called “Coalite,” the car attracts little interest.

1886

The first gasoline car
The first gasoline car

Luis Davilla/Getty Images
Karl Benz builds the Benz Patent Motorwagen, generally credited as being the first internal combustion-powered automobile and the precursor of all gasoline-powered cars today. Electric cars have already been around for 50 years.

1897

Electric taxi fleets
Electric taxi fleets

English Heritage/Heritage Images/Getty Images
Fleets of electric taxi cabs are introduced in both Paris and New York.

1898

Porsche’s first car is electric
Porsche’s first car is electric

Franziska Kraufmann/picture alliance/Getty Images
Dr. Ferdinand Porsche builds his first car, the Egger-Lohner Model C.2 Phaeton, which is powered by electricity.

1899

Too fast
Too fast

Underwood Archives/Getty Images
The first speeding ticket in America is given to the driver of one of New York’s electric cabs. He’s pulled over by a bike riding police officer while driving 12 miles an hour in an 8 mile per hour zone.

Crazy fast
Crazy fast

Universal History Archive/UIG/Getty Images
Belgian race driver Camille Jenatzy becomes the first person to drive over 100 kilometers an hour, or 62 miles per hour, in a specially built electric car called "La Jamais Contente,” or “The Never Satisfied.”

1900s

The rise of the electric car
The rise of the electric car

Stock Montage/Getty Images
Electric cars rise to prominence as more viable alternatives to steam cars, which can take 45 minutes to start in the morning, and to gasoline cars, which have to be cranked to start and that required complicated gear shifting. As a result, electric cars are advertised as especially suitable for women given their lighter physical demands. By the turn of the century, more than a third of all cars on American roads are electric. The electric car’s prominence will be short-lived, however, as technological advancements soon give gasoline power an overwhelming lead.

1908

Ford’s cheap gas car
Ford’s cheap gas car

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images
Ford Motor Co. introduces the Model T. Thanks to repeated improvements in its production, this gasoline-powered car will become ever cheaper to buy and nearly ubiquitous on American roads. (Still, Henry Ford’s wife, Clara, drives an electric car which she prefers to her husband’s noisy creations.)

1912

GM kills the crank
GM kills the crank

Courtesy General Motors
General Motors introduces the electric starter on the Cadillac Touring Edition, eliminating the need to crank the engine. This invention removes one of the most objectionable aspects of driving a gasoline-powered car. Over the following decades, electric cars virtually disappear from the roads as gasoline and diesel power take over. Electric cars will continue to be hampered by their limited driving range, long charging times and bulky batteries.

1958

Ford goes nuclear
Ford goes nuclear

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images
One answer to the electric cars’ shortcomings is an onboard nuclear reactor. Ford’s Nucleon concept car, really just a model, is envisioned as having a reactor core that can power the car for 5,000 miles. After that, spent fuel rods will be swapped out at a convenient service station. The Nucleon was designed based on the assumption that, someday, nuclear reactors could be made safe enough for use in cars, a popular idea at the time.

1959

Small-scale electrics
Small-scale electrics

Courtesy Lane Motor Museum
During the late 1950s and throughout the ‘60s, various startup automakers attempt to popularize electric cars, but none really gain traction. The Nu-Klea Starlite was offered for a few years by Kish Industries, a company based just outside Lansing, Michigan.

1964

GM’s electric experiments
GM’s electric experiments

Courtesy General Motors
Major automakers haven’t totally given up on the potential of electric cars. General Motors experiments with the Electrovair, a Chevrolet Corvair converted to run on batteries. Years later, GM also creates the Electrovette, an electric Chevrolet Chevette.

1967

AMC’s experiments
AMC’s experiments

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images
American Motors Corporation, which was later absorbed by Chrysler, unveils the Amitron, a prototype electric car. The company says it plans to offer the Amitron for sale in just a few years. That never happens.

1974

Tiny startups, tiny cars
Tiny startups, tiny cars

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images
The Sebring-Vanguard company of Sebring, Florida, introduces the CitiCar, which becomes one of the most popular electric cars in many years. More than 4,400 are ultimately sold. Top speed for the CitiCar is 38 miles an hour. For better or worse, cars like this will shape the public’s image of electric cars as essentially road-going golf carts for a long time.

1980

New cells
New cells

Courtesy of Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin
The cobalt-oxide cathode, the heart of the lithium-ion battery, is invented by John Goodenough and his colleagues at Oxford University. In the decades to come, batteries made possible by this invention will power all sorts of consumer electronics, as well as electric cars that can travel hundreds of miles on a charge.

1990

The Zero Emissions challenge
The Zero Emissions challenge

Getty Images
California passes the Zero Emission Vehicles Mandate, which requires automakers operating in California to sell a certain percentage of Zero Emission Vehicles each year. As a practical matter, that mostly means electric cars. Automakers work to comply while some also sue to stop, or at least weaken, the requirement. A dozen other states later adopt the ZEV Mandate. Eventually, it is changed to allow automakers to buy ZEV credits as an alternative to selling the actual cars.

GM’s big response
GM’s big response

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images
General Motors unveils the Impact concept car at the Los Angeles Auto Show. In a few years, this concept will be developed into the EV1.

1996

GM charges in
GM charges in

Hal Garb/AFP/Getty Images
General Motors puts the EV1 into production. The cars are available for lease, but not for sale.

1997

More EVs come onto the scene
More EVs come onto the scene

Jonathan Alcorn/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Largely to comply with California’s requirements, various automakers release electric cars that are often heavily modified versions of gasoline cars. New electric models include the Toyota Rav4 EV, the Honda EV Plus, the Chevrolet S-10 EV and Ford Ranger EV pickups.

2003

GM takes a giant step back
GM takes a giant step back

Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images
GM cancels the EV1 program, takes back the cars and crushes most of them over the protests of former owners. The move becomes the subject of the documentary film “Who Killed the Electric Car?,” which paints GM as the villain. GM insists the cars could not continue being driven because it would have become impossible to maintain them in safe condition.

2006

The startup that changes everything
The startup that changes everything

Chris Weeks/WireImage/Getty Images
Tesla Motors, founded in 2003, shows off prototypes of the Tesla Roadster, the company’s first car. It’s a two-seat sports car based on the Lotus Elise. Priced at over $80,000, it’s a luxury product, but it performs like a sports car and can go more than 200 miles on a charge. It uses lithium-ion batteries, which will become the standard technology for electric cars.

2009

Mitsubishi’s egg
Mitsubishi’s egg

Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images
Mitsubishi starts production of the i-MiEV (Mitsubishi Innovative Electric Vehicle), which will also be sold under the Peugeot and Citroen brands in Europe. The small egg-shaped city car is one of the first mass market EVs from a major automaker.

Tesla’s sedan
Tesla’s sedan

Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP/Getty Images
Tesla unveils the Model S sedan with seating for up to seven people. It will go on to become the fastest-selling electric car in history by far, despite its luxury car prices. Consumer Reports will laud it as the best car the magazine has ever tested although dependability issues will lead the magazine to pull its recommendation in 2019.

2010

Nissan enters the market
Nissan enters the market

Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images
Nissan starts production of the Leaf, a practical, compact electric car with a relatively long driving range for its time. Sales would not live up to Nissan’s early predictions but, as of 2018, more Leafs had been sold than any other electric car model.

The Volt takes things farther
The Volt takes things farther

John F. Martin /General Motors/Getty Images
Production begins for the Chevrolet Volt. This is GM’s “range-extended electric car,” but most people will call it a plug-in hybrid. GM engineers see it as an electric car that does away with “range anxiety,” a term first used to describe the fear that a GM EV1 would run out of battery power before reaching a charger. The Volt wins the North American Car of the Year, European Car of the Year and Motor Trend Car of the Year awards, among others.

2011

New rules of the road
New rules of the road

Pete Souza/Official White House Photo
The US Environmental Protection Agency, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the California Air Resources Board and major automakers announce jointly negotiated increases in fuel economy and emissions requirements. As planned, these will require cars and SUVs to become, on average, much more fuel efficient by the year 2025. Meeting these requirements essentially requires the sale of more electric and hybrid vehicles. This move, combined with tighter emissions requirements in Europe and electric car purchase incentives in China, drives manufacturers to develop more electric and other plug-in hybrid cars.

2015

VW gets busted
VW gets busted

Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg/Getty Images
The US Environmental Protection Agency announces it has caught Volkswagen using software in many of its diesel vehicles to cheat on emissions tests, resulting in fines, penalties and the arrest of executives in both the United States and Europe. Partly as a result of this, Volkswagen Group declares that it will invest heavily in electric vehicles.

2016

A cheaper Tesla
A cheaper Tesla

Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Tesla unveils its Model 3, which will become the brand’s most affordable and best selling car. In fact, in 2018, it will be the best selling luxury car of any kind.

GM is back
GM is back

Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg/Getty Images
General Motors begins production of the Chevrolet Bolt EV, the company’s first fully electric car since the EV1. It’s built at GM’s Orion Assembly plant in Michigan. It is also the basis of GM’s first attempts at producing fully autonomous cars.

2017

VW plugs in
VW plugs in

Stefan Sauer/picture alliance/Getty Images
Volkswagen Group starts Electrify America, a subsidiary company that will build a network of fast electric vehicle chargers across the United States. Volkswagen, along with Ford, BMW, and Daimler, is also part of Ionity, a joint venture that is building a similar fast charging network across Europe.

2018

Sales are just beginning to ramp up
Sales are just beginning to ramp up

Chinatopix/AP
Global electric vehicle sales continue to increase rapidly. But all plug-in vehicles, including electric and plug-in hybrids, still only make up just over 2% of all passenger vehicle sales globally. More than half of all electric cars sold worldwide are in China, thanks to heavy government incentives.


Electric cars have been around since before the US Civil War
 

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Electric Cars Still Face a Major Roadblock

To wean drivers off gas vehicles, automakers need to help them develop a whole new understanding of what it means to own a motorcar.

IAN BOGOST
JUN 27, 2019


An electric vehicle at a Whole Foods–branded charging station


ROGELIO V. SOLIS / AP

I have an old Jeep that’s on its last legs. We’ve rebuilt the transmission and replaced most of the suspension, at a cost that far outstrips the hypothetical value of the car. It runs, but just. It burns oil like a refinery and gets terrible gas mileage to boot.

Replacing it with an electric car seems like a no-brainer. Used lease returns for the less expensive models, such as the Nissan Leaf or Fiat 500e, can be cheap—less than $10,000 in some cases—and come with less than 30,000 miles. But they pose other problems, largely related to the fact that electric vehicles (EVs) don’t operate like traditional cars. Many of the early models you can now buy used have ranges less than 90 miles a charge, for one. Some can’t use the fastest public chargers. The standard 110-volt outlet in my garage would take about 24 hours to fully charge one of these cars. I could add a 240-volt outlet, but my circuit box is full, so I’d need to spend a lot more money to add a subpanel. Used EVs tend to appear in the markets where they were first introduced, California especially. But with such a small range, you can’t drive one cross-country; it has to be shipped. That’s more money. The range is plenty for city driving, but what if my older daughter wants to take it to school? That would be impossible.

There really aren’t that many differences between an electric car and one with an internal combustion engine. It doesn’t have an engine or a gearbox, which gives it a lot more torque at low speeds. And it doesn’t use fuel, of course, but has a battery that needs to be charged. That’s about it. But those differences have an outsized impact on the electric-vehicle ecosystem. Drivers will have to acclimate to that ecosystem for EVs to become mass-market compatible, and the industry knows it, so it’s trying to get ahead of the problem.

When you buy a gas-fueled car, you operate it the same way every owner has for a century. It can drive for many hundreds of miles before refueling. If it needs gas, you go to a gas station—they’re everywhere. If you want to tour the great American road, you don’t even think of, let alone worry about, where you’ll be able to make a pit stop. None of that is true for electric vehicles; not yet, anyway.
“When you make an EV purchase, you have to ask: ‘What’s the range, what’s the battery life, and is there a charging infrastructure at my home, at my work, or in between that will accommodate my lifestyle?’” Chris Womack, an executive vice president at the utility Southern Company, explained on Tuesday during a panel at the Aspen Ideas Festival, co-hosted by the Aspen Institute and The Atlantic. For most people, especially city dwellers, even EVs with a short range are enough to get them to work and back. Jonathan Levy, a vice president at the vehicle-charging-station company EVgo, pointed out that the average commute is about 30 miles a day. “Sipping on 110v is fine for many people,” Levy said, “supplementing at work and with fast-charging in public.”

But the average reality might not be enough to quell the concerns of potential EV consumers, who will have to wean themselves from the expectations of the internal-combustion era. Some of that change introduces more convenience: You can’t fuel up your car at home, but you can charge it there, even if it’s only via the slow drip of a standard electrical outlet. But away from home, not knowing where a charging point might be introduces new uncertainties to driving.
One of Womack’s co-workers drives an electric vehicle, and she can charge it at work. But one day her child got sick at day care. “It screwed up the whole day,” Womack said. The co-worker had to ask herself, “Do I have enough power to get to day care, to the doctor, back to day care, and back to work and then home?” Eventually, there might be a charging station at the day care and the doctor’s office. In Atlanta, where Southern Company is based, a 2017 ordinance requires 20 percent of parking spaces in new buildings to be EV-ready. But for now, the matter still requires a bit of calculation and nail-biting.

According to Cody Thacker, the head of electrification at Audi of America, about 80 to 90 percent of EV charging happens at home. But the fear of running out of charge—like the fear of running out of gas—can still drive consumer habits. And the rush to deliver electric vehicles and EV services has created some problems as it’s solved others. Not all vehicles can use the same charging apparatus, for example. Thacker calls this a “VHS/Betamax moment,” and hopes that standards will emerge as more manufacturers roll out more cars. Audi, for its part, is investing $36 billion in five new EV models over the next five years. And even if you can find a fast-charging station at work or at the grocery store, different companies sometimes operate those services. Imagine if you had to have two different accounts to get gas at a Shell station and a Chevron. That might standardize, too—earlier this month, two major EV-charging networks, ChargePoint and Electrify America, announced a plan to make their services interoperable. That’s good news, but it’s also bizarre that you can’t just swipe a credit card.

Now that the EV market is expanding beyond those who can afford Teslas, manufacturers are realizing that they can’t assume these challenges will resolve themselves on their own. That means an automaker like Audi has to press into new terrain, including advocating for open standards among charging services and helping consumers prepare for an EV future. On the latter front, the company has partnered with Amazon Home Services to make getting 240-volt circuits installed in garages easier. It’s a start, but not enough. “If the average American garage is not capable of EV charging, is ownership a reality?” Thacker asked. “We bear the responsibility to solve that.”





IAN BOGOST
is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and the Ivan Allen College Distinguished Chair in Media Studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His latest book is Play Anything.




Electric Cars Still Face a Major Roadblock
 

adsatinder

explorer
It is like some Mobile Charging War,
I saw all this, when Power Bank was not a popular thing 6-7 years ago
Where you fight for Cable compatible with your mobile :
Nokia Port
iphone Port
Smasung wide Port,
Common USB Port (common now)
C Port (latest flagships)

Such fights still happen in India.
If sockets are much less and people are more at a place.
Old Train Coaches (Non AC) have 1 socket at each corner only.
Already they are occupied before you think you need a immediate charge to go down your mobile.
AC Coaches are now have sockets to charge near by your seat for 6 people.
Somehow now people started buying Power Banks and they keep it for long journeys.

We need Car Power Banks too !
LOL !
 
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