The future is electric?

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Problems in developing EV Platform :



Last Updated : Mar 06, 2019 05:27 PM IST | Source: PTI
Purely electric vehicle platform in long term, EV based on Ford platform on anvil: M&M

While the company is not betting big on personal use of EVs, according to Managing Director Pawan Goenka, M&M is looking to bring an electric car based on a platform of Ford with which it has an agreement to develop products jointly to add to its portfolio.

PTI@moneycontrolcom


Mahindra & Mahindra (M&M) foresees developing electric vehicle (EV) only platforms in the long term although it will continue to leverage on its internal combustion engine vehicle platforms to develop EVs in the short term, according to a top company official.
While the company is not betting big on personal use of EVs, according to Managing Director Pawan Goenka, M&M is looking to bring an electric car based on a platform of Ford with which it has an agreement to develop products jointly to add to its portfolio.
"In the short run we are converting our current vehicles to EVs. So we already have e-Verito and we will be launching e-KUV in about six months time and one year after that we will launch electric XUV300," Goenka told PTI here on the sidelines of the Geneva Motor Show.

He further said,"post that, we are looking at doing platform ground up for electric vehicles."

The difficulty of doing an EV only platform, Goenka said, "is that a new platform costs a lot of money in terms of investment. Electric vehicles right now have not reached a point where we can afford to spend that much money for an electric only platform."
Referring to the Battista developed by group firm Automobili Pininfarina which was unveiled here, he said the company could afford to invest on a electric supercar like that as it is a very expensive car but the same could not be done for normal personal electric mobility solutions.
"Now, the difficulty is that a new platform costs a lot of money in terms of investment. EVs right now have not reached a point where we can afford to spend that much money for an electric only platform," Goenka said.
"So for the short term, it is going to be conversion of internal combustion engine platform to electric platform. In the longer run we will have more electric only platforms," he added.
Reiterating that M&M is "not betting in a big way on personal use of EVs", he said,"our view is that it will be mostly commercial...when we launch XUV300-electric there perhaps we will have two options...one for shared mobility which will be low cost option and one option for personal mobility."
Referring to M&M'a partnership with Ford, he said at present M&M is trying to see how its alliance with Ford, and the one with Ssangyong can be leveraged fully to help each of the three associations to reduce product development costs and get larger economy of scale for purchasing by having a common platform that the companies share across.
"Right now we are in midst of deciding on two platforms with Ford...one is compact SUV which we have talked about and the other one is a battery electric vehicle on a Ford platform," Goenka said.
On the EV roadmap, he said M&M would focus its energy on electric vehicles and would not get distracted by hybrid technology.
"We cannot do everything (electric and hybrid)...We will continue to focus on EVs and we may come into strong hybrids. I am not saying that we will never do it (hybrids) but right now our focus is on EVs," he asserted.

Although that government has provided some support for strong hybrids under FAME II scheme, Goenka said that would not change M&M's stand of focussing on EVs.

When asked about overall new product pipeline, Goenka said in the recent past the company has done three launches of Marazzo, Alturas G4 and XUV 300.
"After this for the next 12 months our full focus will be on BS VI. There would not be new launches although there can be few refreshes that can happen," he said.
After that, he said: "We will have our new series of launches. We will have two-three new product launches in the next 24 months, (FY21 and FY 22), including electric and internal combustion engine."

First Published on Mar 6, 2019 05:15 pm

Purely electric vehicle platform in long term, EV based on Ford platform on anvil: M&M
 

Big Daddy

Super User
I think the only place EV can be successfully implemented would be the US and that too after the arrival of 5G. The 5G will allow for Artificial Intelligence applications. I can see self-driven EVs that automatically decide when to charge and where to charge based on the availability of charging locations. Complex optimization and scheduling problems need to be solved to make everything cost effective.

For everywhere else, I do not see much merit. These vehicles will be expensive because people will charge them too often or not charge them enough. There are somethings humans are just not good at and EVs will be one of them.
 
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adsatinder

explorer
Why India lags behind in electric vehicle revolution
The industry should have been given a clear road map to follow, so that the government could effectively implement a carrot-and-stick policy. Without a stick the carrot loses its charm.

ANALYSIS Updated: Feb 11, 2019 13:00 IST

KumKum Dasgupta

KumKum Dasgupta

Hindustan Times


Visitors during the inauguration of Electric Vehicle Expo 2018, Pragati Maidan, New Delhi, December 21, 2018(Sushil Kumar/HT PHOTO)


On January 30, 2019, the Government of India reduced the customs duty on Electric Vehicles (EVs) that are imported in completely knocked down or semi knocked down state from 15-30% to 10-15%. This, the Centre hopes, will make it more attractive to ship greener vehicles into the country than those run on fossil fuels, and also encourage companies to assemble EVs in India.
In an interview to Hindustan Times, air pollution control strategist Parthaa Bosu speaks on why India lags behind the EV revolution .
KD: In 2018, automobile manufacturers showcased prototypes of EVs at the Auto Expo to indicate their inclination towards developing EVs. But nothing much seems to have happened since then. Why?
PB: I have been seeing EVs (cars and bikes) prototypes since 2008 on display. So you can say it has been a decade, and nothing much has happened. To be fair, the automobile industry today is going through a period of uncertainty.

In 2008-09 there was a lot of discussion about clean diesel technology, then (luckily) diesel was discouraged, and the boost was to an upgraded emission standards, and now EVs. In between, we shouldn’t forget that there are regular news updates on fuel cells and hybrids. I am sure these are nightmares for the automobile industry.
For a company it is matter of a lot of money when we talk about a new power train (the mechanism that transmits the drive from the engine of a vehicle to its axle). At the same time, private companies have the responsibility to understand what their customers want and what society demands. It is not rocket science to see that vehicle numbers are rising, that vehicles contribute significantly to urban air pollution, and that around the world emission standards for vehicles are ever tightening. This is a fact that manufacturers have to plan for.
However, timing is important, and in this case the government is in charge. The industry should have been given a clear road map to follow, so that the government could effectively implement a carrot-and-stick policy. Without a stick the carrot loses its charm.

KD: Is Feebate (a system of charges and rebates whereby energy-efficient or environmentally friendly practices are rewarded while failure to adhere to such practices is penalised) a sound policy for India?
PB: By all means. There is no need to provide any kind of rewards to any industry that is not willing to shoulder the journey of sustainability. It was never the responsibility of the government to be responsible alone. We cannot always push to the government to face the international community to make commitments, which it can’t fulfill unless the industry steps in. But the government should set clear, enforceable timelines. It can also encourage faster change by giving tax rebates to customers buying EVs for example.
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KD: To promote domestic assembling of electric vehicles, the Union government has lowered customs duty on import of parts and components of such vehicles to 10% to 15%. Until now, vehicle parts and components imported for assembly in India attracted import duty of 15% to 30%. Will this help?
PB: The government is not clear what it wants. The clarity that we need is: why do we need to lower the customs duty at all? If we are lowering the duties to promote production of indigenous EVs as a solution to cleaner environment then we need to see this more holistically i.e. why reduce it and why not remove it completely for a period?
Why does the transition to clean technology need to be that abrupt? For example, we have few hybrid vehicles being sold in the country. If the government wants to promote clean technology vehicles, then government should first use the hybrid vehicles as a bridge till the time the EV and its infrastructure matures. Then all the hybrid vehicles should not attract any imports duty. We need to understand why does the government tax import: This is because it wants to nurture and encourage the domestic industry. Now either the domestic industry isn’t not capable or the government didn’t give enough time to the industry to prepare the power trains the government plans.
For example, in 2009 when the Chinese government realised they have a pollution problem, they decided to include seven strategic industries that could be nurtured as future industries. Out of the seven, two were alternative fuel and EVs. We probably also need to think longer term, and plan the metamorphosis, hand holding the original equipment manufacturer, and encouraging the users to get used to charging their vehicles just like they do with their mobile phones and smart watches.

KD: Unlike the Centre, Delhi, Karnataka and Telangana unveiled their respective EV policies this year. Will this change the overall scenario? What more needs to be done at the national level
PB: Unfortunately, the Centre needs to initiate policies. It needs to do the exercise to bring the EVs on the roads and then the cities probably can have policies to promote or discourage them. As of today they (both EVs & the required infrastructure) don’t exist. Having a national policy is the best case for the industry. However, having some large markets with policies is better than none at all. It is important to encourage the transition no matter how piecemeal or halting. It is the future of transportation.


First Published: Feb 11, 2019 12:58 IST


Why India lags behind in electric vehicle revolution
 

adsatinder

explorer
Elon Musk releases all Tesla patents to help save the Earth
WORLD Updated: Feb 01, 2019 08:08 IST
Agence France-Presse

Agence France-Presse
San Francisco

Elon Musk,Tesla,Tesla patents


Elon Musk announced Thursday he had released all of the electric carmaker Tesla’s patents, as part of an effort to fight climate change.(AFP File Photo)

Elon Musk announced Thursday he had released all of the electric carmaker Tesla’s patents, as part of an effort to fight climate change.
In a blog post, the colourful billionaire founder of Tesla promised the company “will not initiate patent lawsuits against anyone who, in good faith, wants to use our technology.” It was a remarkable move in an industry where the smallest idea or seed of invention is carefully guarded to protect its monetary value.
And it in fact came on the same day US prosecutors charged a Chinese national with stealing secrets from Apple’s self-driving vehicle project.
“Tesla Motors was created to accelerate the advent of sustainable transport,” Musk said.

“If we clear a path to the creation of compelling electric vehicles, but then lay intellectual property landmines behind us to inhibit others, we are acting in a manner contrary to that goal,” he said.
In fact Musk said he was now sceptical of patents which too often only served “to stifle progress” and helped enrich giant corporations and lawyers rather than inventors.
He said he had earlier felt compelled to file patents for Tesla to prevent big car companies from copying the technology and using the huge marketing and sales apparatus to take over the market.
“We couldn’t have been more wrong. The unfortunate reality is the opposite,” he said, noting that electric or clean-fuel cars “at the major manufacturers are small to non-existent.” But with car production continuing at 100 million a year “it is impossible for Tesla to build electric cars fast enough to address the carbon crisis,” Musk said.
Have other companies making electric cars and the world would benefit from rapid advances in technology.
“We believe that applying the open-source philosophy to our patents will strengthen rather than diminish Tesla’s position,” and ability to attract talented engineers, he said.



Elon Musk releases all Tesla patents to help save the Earth
 

Theloststory

Well-Known Member
Finally something to look forward to. With a let’s say 300km charge range (as per Tesla or Chevy Volt) Within the city, charging shouldn’t be an issue. However I think it should be fairly easy to deploy charging points at highway dhabas like Kamath.s or so. Take. One hour lunch break and get decent amount of charge back.

Apparently the Tesla Model S can supercharge from 0-100% in about 75 minutes. That solves range anxiety.
 
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Yogesh Sarkar

Administrator
Finally something to look forward to. With a let’s say 300km charge range (as per Tesla or Checy Volt) Within the city, charging shouldn’t be needed. However I think it should be fairly easy to deploy charging points at highway dhabas like Kamath.s or so. Take. One hour lunch break and get decent amount of charge back.

Apparently the Tesla Model S can supercharge from 0-100% in about 75 minutes. That solves range anxiety.
Let's hope so. However, I do not have high hopes for Indian Electric Car Manufacturers, unless they feel threatened by similar priced imports.
 

adsatinder

explorer
After 40 Years, Researchers Finally Unlock Mystery Of Low Solar Panel Output & Help Environment

indiatimes.com

Jun 9, 2019 8:06 AM

Believe it or not, solar panels around the world -- no matter who manufactures them -- suffer from a physical phenomenon that makes them lose electricity as it's generated.

This ends up costing huge over time, as the world is racing towards renewable energy goals, as the deficit power lost has to be made up by non-renewable energy sources which in turn harms the environment.

But after after 40 years of concerted global effort, the mystery behind the low solar panel efficiency has finally been solved.

[https://img2]

A new study outlined in the Journal Of Applied Physics points towards a material defect in silicon used to produce solar cells -- a defect that has till now gone wholly undetected.

Researchers agree that this defect is responsible for the 2 percent efficiency drop that solar panels experience when they begin the energy generation process at sunrise, a defect which is known as Light Induced Degradation (LID).

According to reports, the researchers were able to find the defect using deep-level transient spectroscopy or DLTS. As electricity in the solar cell starts getting generated, due to increasing sunlight, the flow of electrons gets trapped, which then reduces the electricity generated.

[https://img2]

Researchers also found out that this is a base-level, fundamental defect that's present at the silicon level across all solar panels, which lies dormant until the solar panel starts steadily getting heated due to the sunlight.

"We've proved the defect exists, its now an engineering fix that is needed," says Iain Crowe from the University of Manchester, one of the researchers involved in the findings, according to Phys.org.

If researchers can fix this defect in the lab and create a new form of solar panel that doesn't suffer from LID, it will give a huge boost to solar panel efficiency to solar plants around the world.






 

adsatinder

explorer
Scooter & Bike Makers In India Very Unhappy! Here’s Why

odishabytes.com

Jun 23, 2019 1:07 PM

[https://img2]

Two-wheeler majors like Bajaj Auto, Hero MotoCorp and TVS are fuming over the government’s push for electric vehicles (EVs).

Niti Aayog has asked scooter and motorbike manufacturers to draw up a plan to switch to EVs, news agency Reuters reported. The deadline to come up with the plan is two weeks, the report quoted unnamed sources as saying.

Niti Aayog officials came with this order during a meeting with executives from two-wheeler companies late on Friday, according to one of the executives at the meeting.

The central think-tank, which is chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and plays a key role in policymaking, had recommended that only electric models of scooters and motorbikes with engine capacity of more than 150cc must be sold from 2025.

Automakers have opposed the proposal and warned that a sudden transition, at a time when auto sales have slumped to a two-decade low, would cause market disruption and job losses.







 

adsatinder

explorer
Niti Aayog asks scooter, bike makers to draw up plan for EVs
2 min read . Updated: 22 Jun 2019, 09:08 PM IST
Reuters


Niti Aayog officials met with executives from companies including Bajaj Auto, Hero MotoCorp and TVS late on Friday
The think-tank had recommended that only electric models of scooters and motorbikes with engine capacity of more than 150cc must be sold from 2025



India's federal think-tank has asked scooter and motorbike manufacturers to draw up a plan to switch to electric vehicles, days after they publicly opposed the government's proposals saying they would disrupt the sector, two sources told Reuters.
Niti Aayog officials met with executives from companies including Bajaj Auto, Hero MotoCorp and TVS late on Friday, giving them two weeks to come up with the plan, according to one of the executives.
The think-tank, which is chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and plays a key role in policymaking, had recommended that only electric models of scooters and motorbikes with engine capacity of more than 150cc must be sold from 2025, sources have told Reuters.
Automakers opposed the proposal and warned that a sudden transition, at a time when auto sales have slumped to a two-decade low, would cause market disruption and job losses.
India is one of the world’s largest two wheeler markets with sales of more than 20 million scooters and motorbikes last year.
During Friday's meeting government officials argued that switching to EVs is of national importance so India does not miss out on the global drive towards environmentally cleaner vehicles, one of sources said.
But industry executives responded that a premature switch with no established supply chain, charging infrastructure or skilled labour in India, could result in India losing its leadership position in scooters and motorbikes, the second source said.
“There were clearly drawn out positions," said the source, adding there were "strong opinions" at the meeting.
Bajaj, Hero and Niti Aayog did not respond to a request for comment, while TVS declined to comment.


ELECTRIFICATION
Niti Aayog is working with several other ministries on the recommendations, which are part of an electrification effort to help India reduce its fuel import bill and curb pollution.
The proposal also includes incentives for local production of batteries, an increase ownership cost of gasoline cars and forming a policy to scrap old vehicles, according to records of government meetings seen by Reuters.
The panel has also suggested measures such as directing taxi aggregators like Uber and Ola to convert 40% of their fleets to electric by April 2026, Reuters has reported.
Executives from EV start-up Ather Energy, ride-sharing firm Ola and officials from the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM), an industry trade body, also attended the meeting, the sources said.
The proposals are India's second attempt for a switch to EVs. In 2017 it proposed an ambitious plan mainly for electric cars but rowed back after facing resistance from car makers.
The current push could disrupt the market order for two-wheelers and open up avenues for local start-ups, analysts say.
Scooter and bike start-ups like Ather, 22Motors and Okinawa are already making in-roads in India.
“It is extremely critical that we make the transition to electric quickly lest we get wiped out by another global wave," Tarun Mehta, CEO and co-founder at Ather said.
This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text.



 
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