The future is electric?

adsatinder

explorer
Niti Aayog comment on electric vehicle segment and fame 2 policy/latest update on fame 2 scheme.

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Singh Auto Zone

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Published on Apr 18, 2019

Welcome to singh auto zone, in this video i share Niti Aayog comment on electric vehicle segment and fame 2 policy,also share latest update and news on fame 2 scheme in india.planning commission on ev segment anf fame 2 scheme in india.
 

adsatinder

explorer
Is policies for electric vehicle segment development in right track ?//niti aayog policy on ev india

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Singh Auto Zone

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Published on Jun 15, 2019

Welcome to SINGH AUTO ZONE, in this video i share as per my experience about the affects of policies made by govt. of india and niti aayog for the development of electric vehicle in india, also share effects of these policies on jobs of people working in auto industries in india.
 

adsatinder

explorer
Niti Aayog’s emobility plan: only electric vehicles to be sold by 2030

Niti Aayog moved a Cabinet note to address emobility targets for a greener India, which emphasises on the sale of only electric vehicles by the year 2030.


Vishal Krishna
18th Jun 2019

In a bold and far-reaching move, India’s electric vehicle goals are set to flourish if Niti Aayog has its way. The government think tank moved a Cabinet note to address emobility targets for a greener India, which emphasises on the sale of only electric vehicles by the year 2030. This would go a long way in addressing India’s clean fuel ideology and reduce high pollution levels.

According to media reports, the note also mentioned e-highways with overhead electricity networks for trucks and buses, and radio cab services, such as Ola and Uber, to go electric by 2030.
Ev_two wheeler


Also ReadElectric Vehicles: ecosystem opportunities and challenges for manufacturers, policymakers and s...


This comes shortly after a proposal was mooted to make all two and three-wheelers battery efficient by 2025. In fact, Niti Aayog CEO Amitabh Kant’s suggestion that only EV (three-wheelers and two-wheelers) of up to 150 CC engine capacity should be sold from 2025 has already garnered much debate.

Sending shock waves among gasoline-based automobile companies, it must be noted that among the industries, Mahindra & Mahindra and Hero MotoCorp are among the few with plans already afoot on emobility. The rest are still contemplating this transition.

Niti Aayog’s goal is to increase the usage of clean-fuel technology and give Indian citizens cleaner air to breathe. According to media reports, road transport and highways ministry will be tasked with coming up with a framework to phase out the sale of diesel and petrol vehicles by 2030 which is one of the significant sources of air pollution.


EV is the way forward

With Niti Aayog's ambitious plans of mandating EVs, companies like Tork, Ultraviolette, Revolt Intellicorp, Ather and Orxa are all set to disrupt the fuel and automobile industry. Their success will lead to higher valuations as venture capital comes knocking into the EV space. This year, Ather began rolling out its bikes to a positive response with unbeatable stats of `15 to run 70 kilometres, which currently takes `67 (for a gasoline bike for the same distance).

Infrastructure the need of the hour

In fact, Ather has more than 30 charging stations in Bengaluru while the other companies in this space are yet to foray into support infrastructure. As of today, there are only 250 charging stations in the country and they mostly catering to three-wheelers. To make this transition viable, infrastructure is a key factor.

"We believe that electric infrastructure will have a massive scale going forward. But the bad part is there is no subsidy for those that want to set up EV infrastructure as a business," says Maxson Lewis, Co-founder of Magenta Power (who has signed an MoU with Lawrence and Mayo showrooms to have EV charging facilities across the country).
SIAM (Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers) the nodal body for Indian automobile industry reports that the country currently sells close to 750,000 electric vehicles a year, a majority of these are three wheelers, which sold 6,30,000 units, with 1,26,000 of these three-wheelers. Cars sold a dismal 3,500 units. In 2018, the entire Indian EV industry saw sales of only 56,000 units.

If Niti Aayog gets it right, we can breathe easy… but automobile companies will have to think of new business models and new product lines.


Niti Aayog’s emobility plan: only electric vehicles to be sold by 2030
 

Big Daddy

Super User
The EVs have nothing to do with pollution. It is a scheme for the government to save on foreign revenue it would otherwise spend on buying petrol. Government has realized the rate at which people are buying vehicles, it would probably deplete foreign reserves in a few months. It is probably better to push everyone into EVs and not spend money on buying too much petrol. When government mandates EV only plan, it means the standard of living for future generations is permanently screwed.
 

Theloststory

Well-Known Member
So it’s here finally. Perhaps India’s first Electric Car worth considering, the Hyundai Kona.
With a 6 hour charging time and 450km range, a torque upwards of 350 Nm, battery warranty of 8 years or 160,000 km it sounds too good to be true. Except the price of 25 lakhs. But expect plenty of rich individuals to buy this one for city commute.

If I had the money I would buy it for city driving.

Makes a lot of sense for cabs too (of course at a lower price, which is perhaps possible with policy support and bigger volumes.).

Since Hyundai has done it. Perhaps Maruti will soon come up with something.

You can even take it out for overnight trips, not too far from city. Reach, charge overnight, then come back too. It seems Hyundai is building a network of chargers in collaboration with IOCL.

I see a business idea with plenty of highly supercharging stations with cafes and meals. Wait an hour for food, coffee, etc and supercharge your. Ev.
 

Yogesh Sarkar

Administrator
So it’s here finally. Perhaps India’s first Electric Car worth considering, the Hyundai Kona.
With a 6 hour charging time and 450km range, a torque upwards of 350 Nm, battery warranty of 8 years or 160,000 km it sounds too good to be true. Except the price of 25 lakhs. But expect plenty of rich individuals to buy this one for city commute.

If I had the money I would buy it for city driving.

Makes a lot of sense for cabs too (of course at a lower price, which is perhaps possible with policy support and bigger volumes.).

Since Hyundai has done it. Perhaps Maruti will soon come up with something.

You can even take it out for overnight trips, not too far from city. Reach, charge overnight, then come back too. It seems Hyundai is building a network of chargers in collaboration with IOCL.

I see a business idea with plenty of highly supercharging stations with cafes and meals. Wait an hour for food, coffee, etc and supercharge your. Ev.
That would be with a 7.2 kW charger. On the plus side, if you can find a 50 kW charger, you can 80% charge in less than an hour. However, the question is, how many people will have access to these fast chargers, without needing to keep the car parked at a dedicated charging area/centre?
 

adsatinder

explorer
Only companies will invest in such cars and hiring business venture and individuals can't buy such cars.
Public will hire cars now on and have to use infrastructure of companies only.
No other practical solution is possible at such costs involved.
4 wheeler will be a luxury only.
 

Big Daddy

Super User
These battery companies will not tell you that 450 KMs range is dependent on how many people are sitting in the car. Add 4 people and the range may drop to 200 KMs. Battery operated engines are efficient when a load is low. For high tow capacity, the most efficient engine is diesel. Generally, fossil fuel engines are less efficient when tow loads are less. As a result, people driving petrol cars never think twice about adding people to their vehicles because their traveling distances do not get impacted noticeably by adding additional people. This is why carpooling is often encouraged.

If people bring those habits to EV then they are in for a surprise.
 

Theloststory

Well-Known Member
@adsatinder : you are right about infrastructure, but Hyundai is apparently suppLying a 7.5kw charger along with the car.

Imagine a reasonably well off person, who has a dedicated parking spot in her house and hence install the charger at home can use this for daily commute. Even if charge drops to 200km, you can go to office, then drive to meetings, drop and pick up kids from school, buy groceries, go to gym and come back at night to leave it for overnight charge.

It’s a Statement car to have. And it helps the environment.
Hotels can buy for airport pickup and drop.

These guys just need to figure out lowering the cost. Maybe the govt can help here by offering initial subsidies. Cheaper cars means more people can buy means infrastructure can develop faster means premium models can be launched too.

The only thing is how does this fare in the Mumbai floods, an annual feature.
 
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