The future is electric?

Big Daddy

Super User
By the way, there are adapter issues with these cars as well. You may go to a charging station and then realize that your car does not have an adapter. Most likely the home charging plug you will get is level 1 charging that charges the car at 3 mile/hour (Approx. 5 Kms/hour). So, your 12 hour charging per day is good for 60 Kms. Level 2 plug installation will add to the cost (likely $1200) assuming that you have plug compatability.

Since fast charging takes 45 minutes to 1 hour, people use these areas as parking spots and go watch a movie. The other people end up wating until the owners of car getting charged come back.

 
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Theloststory

Well-Known Member
Actually not all EVs are junk. Electric motors have better acceleration and torque and a better linear power delivery. And the best ones today are very expensive hence very premium too. When I visited San Francisco and NYC recently, I was pleasantly surprised to see a huge number of Tesla, Chevrolet Bolt and Nissan Leaf cars on the road.

Check Rivian R1 Truck, for instance. 0-60mph in 3 seconds (like a Porsche?). 5000kg towing capacity. 750hp power. Range is unto 400 miles.

Tesla Model S. 0-60 mph in 2.4 seconds. Wow. 370 miles range.
Tesla.jpg
RivianR1T.jpg
 

Theloststory

Well-Known Member
Tesla Roadster. 0-60mph in 1.9 Seconds. Even though Rivian and Tesla Roadster aren't yet available to purchase right now, the positive experience of Model S shows these claims are very much achievable. As time goes, things will only get better. Like mileage increase in fossil fuel cars. As time is passing modern 2 litre engines give more power and mileage than 15 year old engines.

I expect EV range and power and charging time, all to improve quickly with time.
 

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adsatinder

explorer
Rediff.com » Business » Industry divided over Budget sops for EVs
Industry divided over Budget sops for EVs

July 08, 2019 18:58 IST

While home-grown firms like Tata and Mahindra have been actively participating in the government’s e-mobility mission, by launching electrified versions of their existing models, the global firms believe electric is not the best solution for a country where the primary source of power generation is coal, and where infrastructure is a big impediment.



Home-grown carmakers have lauded the government’s resolve to promote electric-driven mobility, even as the local arms of global firms rued that the fiscal incentives in the Budget leave out other clean vehicle technology options.
“As an industry, we could not have asked for more. The onus is now on us to make it work,” said Pawan Goenka, managing director, Mahindra & Mahindra, on the measures announced in the Budget to promote electric vehicles (EVs).

Shailesh Chandra, president–electric mobility business and corporate strategy at Tata Motors, said: “The incentives reinforce a strong commitment by the government to steer electrification on a faster trajectory.”

The income tax rebate of Rs 150,000 for EV customers will, he said, encourage buyers in the personal mobility space to “seriously consider EVs.
These buyers were left out of the FAME (faster adoption and manufacturing of hybrid and electric vehicles) scheme’s second phase (FAME-II), announced earlier this year.
With the objective of narrowing the price gap between EVs and internal combustion engine-powered vehicles, the Budget proposes to cut the Goods and Services Tax (GST) rate on EVs to 5 per cent, from the 12 per cent.
In a note after the Budget, Hetal Gandhi, director at CRISIL Research, wrote that the reduction will be favourable for a purchase decision on an electric two-wheeler or electric taxi.
However, “the personal electric small car still remains unfavourable, due to lack of a FAME-II subsidy”.
Goenka’s and Chandra’s peers at Mercedes-Benz and Toyota Kirloskar Motor (TKM) do not share the sentiment.
“Though the Budget has given a boost to green mobility, we wished for the inclusion of plug-in hybrids for duty exemption as well, as that would have further given a push,” said Martin Schwenk, managing director at Mercedes-Benz India.
Shekar Viswanathan, vice-chairman at TKM, said while EVs do bring benefits in fossil fuel conservation and lowering of carbon emissions, there are other forms of green mobility which could help in the same objective.
“The government should also align its taxation policies towards such green mobilities which promote reduction of fossil fuel and betterment of environment,” he said.
The system , he explained, should facilitate a consumer in choosing a clean vehicle technology that best suits his/her mobility needs.
The India arms of global firms, particularly from Japan, have been pushing for a technology-agnostic route to curb emissions, in a country which is home to the world’s most polluted cities.
While home-grown firms like Tata and Mahindra have been actively participating in the government’s e-mobility mission, by launching electrified versions of their existing models, the global firms believe electric is not the best solution for a country where the primary source of power generation is coal, and where infrastructure is a big impediment.
Instead, they have been pushing for hybrids as the most plausible solution.
The local arms of Honda and Toyota, for instance, are preparing for a hybrid model launch by 2021.
The Rs 10,000-crore FAME-II scheme makes strong and plug-in hybrids under Rs 15 lakh eligible for an incentive of Rs 20,000.
Though small as compared to what EVs are eligible for, this is expected to create a momentum.
Chetan Maini, co-founder and vice-chairman at SUN Mobility, said while the reduction in GST on EVs and the tax benefit “is a reassuring move by the government and furthers the country’s commitment to transition to an EV future”, it would be more beneficial for the end-user if the government also focuses on reducing the GST on charging, battery swapping services from 18 per cent to 5 per cent.

The Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers said the industry welcomed the move to promote EVs but was disappointed that an incentive scheme to scrap older polluting vehicles did not find any mention in the Budget.



Industry divided over Budget sops for EVs
 

adsatinder

explorer
Flipkart to roll out EVs for last-mile deliveries
Flipkart to roll out EVs for last-mile deliveries

June 28, 2019 13:23 IST
The aim is to replace nearly 40 per cent of its existing last mile fleet of delivery vans with EVs by March 2020.
To start with, the company is looking at deploying nearly 160 e-vans by the end of 2019.

Illustration: Uttam Ghosh/Rediff.com



Walmart-owned e-commerce firm Flipkart on Thursday unveiled plans to introduce electric vehicles (EVs) for its last-mile deliveries across the country.
The initiative is part of Flipkart’s sustainability commitment to reinvigorate efforts towards building technologies for solving crucial environment and civic issues, the company said.

“Our team is working with local ecosystem partners to help them co-design concepts for electric vehicles best suited for the growing e-commerce industry,” said Kalyan Krishnamurthy, group chief executive officer, Flipkart.

The introduction of EVs, the company said, would happen in a phased manner.
The aim is to replace nearly 40 per cent of its existing last mile fleet of delivery vans with EVs by March 2020.
To start with, the company is looking at deploying nearly 160 e-vans by the end of 2019.
At present, Flipkart has already deployed eight e-vans in Hyderabad, 10 in New Delhi and 30 e-bikes in Bengaluru.
“We see tremendous growth opportunity in electric freight mobility from a greener supply chain perspective, which will play a key role in building a robust supply chain for the future,” said Amitesh Jha, senior vice-president, Ekart and Marketplace, Flipkart.
“These efforts will help us contribute towards electric mobility by reducing our dependence on conventional power sources, while bringing cost efficiencies for the business.”
Flipkart will also be working closely with EV manufacturers to get the right designs suitable for e-commerce deliveries.
In the past six months, the e-commerce firm had conducted multiple pilots for deployment of EVs in its supply chain.
It is also setting up the necessary charging infrastructure at its hubs in order to deploy EVs at large scale and ensure their seamless operations.
Rajneesh Kumar, chief corporate affairs officer, Flipkart, said the company would use its existing infrastructure at warehouses and hubs to overcome challenges such as charging stations and electricity for the vehicles.
“Eventually, our vision is to completely make the last and first mile (delivery) electric.”
With these initiatives, the company is looking at reducing its carbon emissions by over 50 per cent.
Ankur Pahwa, partner and national leader, e-commerce and consumer internet at EY India, said electrification of last mile delivery platforms (both hyperlocal and logistic arm of companies) was a crucial step towards curbing pollution.
He said adoption at scale would help in bringing down costs of production of EVs, more acceptability towards this mode of transport and would spur innovation for the betterment of this technology.
“It will help in bringing down their maintenance and delivery cost which in turn has a positive effect on their unit economics.
"It will also help brands position themselves as environment-friendly and socially conscious,” said Pahwa.
"With the government’s aim to have at least 30 per cent of vehicles be EV by 2030, the step taken by e-commerce and hyperlocal platforms to adopt this technology could be the tipping point in the right direction,” he added.
There are already a few small firms in the country which provide EVs and services to large e-commerce and foodtech companies. One among them is DOT, which offers green mobility services through its fleet of two- and three-wheeler electric vehicles.
Some of its major clients include Amazon, Walmart, BigBasket and Swiggy.
Currently operating in over 20 cities, the firm has plans to expand to 600 towns by 2020.
Ride-hailing company Ola has also set up an electric vehicle arm called Ola Electric Mobility (Ola Electric).
It is running several pilots, involving charging solutions, battery swapping stations, and deploying vehicles across two, three and four-wheeler segments.
Also, in March, Hyundai Motor Company and Kia Motors Corporation said they would invest $300 million in Ola.
The deal will see the three companies collaborate towards developing the fleet and mobility solutions, building India-specific EVs and infrastructure.
Peerzada Abrar in Bengaluru

Source:


Flipkart to roll out EVs for last-mile deliveries
 

Big Daddy

Super User
Yes, they are junk because I speak from experience. Those manufactures' specs do not mean much. How many times I have been stuck behind hybrid cars when the light is red. When the light changes to green, the first thing that comes to mind is: why these cheapsters who want to save a buck and cause aggrevation to others? You have a slow acceleration car in front that starts and accelerates at grandma's speed and holds up powerful cars at the back for eternity. I would not be the one to harass others.

The problem is larger though. All innovations of first half of 20th century made life easy. Cars, planes, washing machines, TVs, refrigerators, etc. made humans productive and free. What do we get in 21st century? Total misery. We get facebook, twitter, smart phones, etc. There may be some merit in these innovations but there are a lot of problems as well.

I see governments and businesses push us into using more technology. Technology has become harassing to consumers. Stores in the US are pushing consumers into using self-checkout counters. Robots are hanging out in grocery stores beeping all the time. The government wants people to use electric cars. Why? Not because these cars are better, but because these cars are a stepping stone towards 5G technologies. At least in the US, there is a move towards automated vehicles, self-driving cars, etc. These guys want cars taking decisions such as optimal routes, balance traffic, optimize resource usage. A concept called "platooning" where the car in the front takes decisions and cars in the back blindly follow the car in the front is shown to conserve resources.

All that stuff is good, but there is something called freedom. I am sick of people telling me what is good for me. No one needs to be told that the refrigerator is good for them. People know what is good for them. As I look into the future, I think of hauling a big camper. Driving a four-wheel drive because it is safe in the snow and not care about conservation. On red light, when I am the first car, I actually care about the convenience of people behind me. I want to shovel snow with my vehicle. The list goes on and on and EV is not something I will consider. Screw the governments around the world.
 

adsatinder

explorer
Govt here also try to push technology of ATM / Paytm etc usage on people.
Illiterates or less educated / aged / non technical people are much harrassed in this.
Many lose their money because of such forced decisions.
Daily fraud reports come and Govt of India is doing nothing at all or failed to stop these hackers / fraudsters.

Cash deposit machines are forced on people here in Govt Bank.
If cash stucks in machine during deposit, no one attends complaints or are least bothered.
They want you to stop all other important works and sit there if you want to resolve the issues.
What rubbish is this ?
Similarly things are forced in other areas also.
 

adsatinder

explorer
May be this type of development is leading Giants to work towards automation.
Battery Operated vehicles will be their best business partners.
They can handle it centrally at any location with help of 5G, GPS etc.

Big vehicles may not be good for now.
Small Size and Distance Vehicles are best bet for such ventures.

Tech
Amazon home robot prototype is reportedly waist-high and can be summoned by voice
Published Fri, Jul 12 2019 8:14 AM EDT Updated 5 hours ago

Todd Haselton @robotodd

Key Points
  • Amazon is still working on a home robot, according to Bloomberg.
  • A current prototype of the "Vesta" robot is about waist-high and can roam around your home using cameras, the report says.
  • Amazon invests heavily in robots for its warehouses but has not yet launched a home robot.
Amazon is still working on a robot that will roam around homes, according to Bloomberg.
A prototype of the robot, codenamed "Vesta," is about "waist-high," can be controlled by voice and is capable of moving around on its own using built-in cameras, according to the report.

A similar report last April revealed that Amazon is interested in creating home robots that might be able to provide access to the company's Amazon Alexa voice assistant no matter where you are. Bloomberg said the robot isn't ready to launch this year as originally planned.
An Amazon representative declined to comment.
Amazon has continued to invest in robotics and in June introduced new warehouse robots including the Pegasus and Xanthus.
Amazon typically holds big product reveal events at its Seattle headquarters in September. Last year, Amazon introduced 15 new Alexa-enabled products, including a microwave. Bloomberg said a new "higher quality Echo speaker" will be announced this year, which is in line with what the company has done in the past.

VIDEO 1:01 01:01
Amazon's new robots to be deployed around the country
The Bottom Line



Amazon home robot prototype is reportedly waist-high and can be summoned by voice
 

Big Daddy

Super User
Govt here also try to push technology of ATM / Paytm etc usage on people.
Illiterates or less educated / aged / non technical people are much harrassed in this.
Many lose their money because of such forced decisions.
Daily fraud reports come and Govt of India is doing nothing at all or failed to stop these hackers / fraudsters.

Cash deposit machines are forced on people here in Govt Bank.
If cash stucks in machine during deposit, no one attends complaints or are least bothered.
They want you to stop all other important works and sit there if you want to resolve the issues.
What rubbish is this ?
Similarly things are forced in other areas also.
I think people in India will not have a choice. They will be forced into buying EV. Those Model S posts are all nice but that model will not be available in India or will have high import tax. Indian EVs may not have the acceleration on Model S. The biggest aggrevation of EV is 1 hour charge time at fast charger. Who has that kind of time. I fill gas once a week and I am done in 5 minutes. Compare that to 1 hour either daily or every other day. A 12 hour home charge daily at regular socket will only give you 60 KMs. I doubt anyone will charge car for 12 hours. Most likely it will be 8-9 hours.
 

adsatinder

explorer
A 12 hour home charge daily at regular socket will only give you 60 KMs. I doubt anyone will charge car for 12 hours. Most likely it will be 8-9 hours.
Or have 2-3 cars / bikes / other options to not to stop for your job,
just because of a battery is getting charged !
We are carrying 2 mobiles mostly just to keep our business on move.
Mobile Network these days is worst in this advanced century !
LOL !
 
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