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Entire earth vibrating less due to Covid-19 lockdowns: Study
By IANS | Published on Fri, Jul 24 2020 14:21 IST

Researchers tracked the 'wave' of quietening between March and May as worldwide lockdown measures took hold (Photo Courtesy: Reto Stockli/ NASA Earth Observatory)

Researchers tracked the 'wave' of quietening between March and May as worldwide lockdown measures took hold (Photo Courtesy: Reto Stockli/ NASA Earth Observatory). Image Source: IANS News


LONDON, JULY 24 : In a study conducted in 117 countries, researchers have found that the world is experiencing the most dramatic reduction in the seismic noise (the hum of vibrations in the planet's crust) in recorded history due to global Covid-19 lockdowns.
Measured by instruments called seismometers, seismic noise is caused by vibrations within the Earth, which travel like waves and the waves can be triggered by earthquakes, volcanoes, and bombs - but also by daily human activity like travel and industry.

This quiet period, likely caused by the total global effect of social distancing measures, closure of services and industry, and drops in tourism and travel, the study published in the journal Science, reported.
The new research, led by the Royal Observatory of Belgium and five other institutions around the world including Imperial College London (ICL), showed that the dampening of 'seismic noise' caused by humans was more pronounced in more densely populated areas.
"Our study uniquely highlights just how much human activities impact the solid Earth, and could let us see more clearly than ever what differentiates human and natural noise," said study co-author Stephen Hicks from ICL in the UK.
For the findings, the research team looked at seismic data from a global network of 268 seismic stations in 117 countries and found significant noise reductions compared to before any lockdown at 185 of those stations.


Researchers tracked the 'wave' of quietening between March and May as worldwide lockdown measures took hold.
The largest drops in vibrations were seen in the most densely populated areas, like Singapore and New York City, but drops were also seen in remote areas like Germany's the Black Forest and Rundu in Namibia.
Citizen-owned seismometers, which tend to measure more localised noise, noted large drops around universities and schools around Cornwall, UK and Boston, US - a drop in noise 20 per cent larger than seen during school holidays.
The findings showed that countries like Barbados, where lockdown coincided with the tourist season, saw a 50 per cent decrease in noise.
"The changes have also given us the opportunity to listen in to the Earth's natural vibrations without the distortions of human input," the study authors wrote.
Earlier in April, a study published in the journal Nature, reported at least a 30 per cent reduction in that amount of ambient human noise since lockdown began in Belgium.


Entire earth vibrating less due to Covid-19 lockdowns: Study



-- The story has been published from a wire feed without any modifications to the text
 

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Flood situation remains grim in Assam
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•Jul 26, 2020


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Flood situation in Assam, brought by incessant rainfall, has affected more than 26 lakh people across 27 districts.
 

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Why Assam & Bihar Floods Every Year? | Explained by Dhruv Rathee






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•Jul 26, 2020

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Year after year it is the same story. Millions of people get displaced in Assam and other north east indian states due to floods, precious human and animal lives are lost. In this video, I analyse the reason behind why these Assam floods happen. Since 1950, there have been 12 major floods, but in recent years the frequency of the floods have increased drastically. Deforestation in the Brahmaputra area, encroachment of floodplains, location of Assam, poor maintenance of embankments and climate change are a few of the reasons. I will specially focus on climate change and embankments in this video. Embankments are also called Levee or Dykes. I explain what they are, the problem with them and the solutions while talking up the Netherlands as a case study.





0:00 Introduction
2:58 Impact of Climate Change
5:08 What is Embankment?
6:42 Embankment Breaching
8:16 Downsides of Embankments
9:32 Netherlands Case Study
11:24 Solutions
 

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Mumbai records its wettest July, breaks all-time high monthly rain record

On Tuesday, south Mumbai recorded intermittent intense spells through the day with 83.6 mm (heavy) rain from 8.30 am to 5.30 pm while the suburbs recorded 7.7 mm rain. Over the last 24 hours moderate rain was recorded in the suburbs and south Mumbai.

MUMBAI Updated: Jul 28, 2020 21:18 IST

Badri Chatterjee

Badri Chatterjee
Hindustan Times, Mumbai

Vehicle seen on closed road due water logging after heavy rain at Manpada junction Ghodbunder road at Thane, Mumbai.


Vehicle seen on closed road due water logging after heavy rain at Manpada junction Ghodbunder road at Thane, Mumbai.(Praful Gangurde/HTPhoto)


The city surpassed its July 2014 record (1,468.5mm) for the all-time high monthly rainfall on Tuesday with intermittent intense rain spells taking the monthly rain tally to 1,474.3 mm from July 1 to July 28 5.30pm.
On Tuesday, south Mumbai recorded intermittent intense spells through the day with 83.6 mm (heavy) rain from 8.30 am to 5.30 pm while the suburbs recorded 7.7 mm rain. Over the last 24 hours moderate rain was recorded in the suburbs and south Mumbai.
A yellow alert (heavy rain warning) was issued for Wednesday and Saturday by the weather bureau.

Meanwhile, the city had surpassed its July average rain target of 840 mm in the first 15 days itself, and has currently recorded 75.5% excess rain for the month. Mumbai has witnessed a total of eight heavy to very heavy rain days this month, which paved the way for previous records to be broken.
The India Meteorological Department (IMD) maintains rain data from 1959 onwards. Though Mumbai received 944.2 mm rain during July 2005, the monthly total was 1454.5 mm. Last year, the city had recorded 1,464.8 mm rain during July. Other landmark years over the past 61 years include 1,455.5 mm in 1965, 1,385.5 mm in 1961, 1,312.9 in 2011, 1,250.4 in 2010, and 1,226.1 mm in 1988.
IMD classifies 15.6-64.4 mm as moderate rain while 64.5-115.5 mm rain as heavy, 115.6-204.4 mm as very heavy, and over 204.5 mm as extremely heavy rain for a period of 24-hours. The city witnessed five ‘very heavy’ rain days through the month so far with maximum rain recorded between July 4 and 5 at 200.8 mm followed by 191.2 mm on July 15-16. Additionally three ‘heavy’ rain days. Apart from July 2, the city has received rainfall every day of the month.

IMD officials said rain during July was consistent as opposed to the pattern during June. Mumbai witnessed a deficient rain during June with the lowest rainfall in five years as the city fell 98 mm short of its monthly average target. “Weather systems in the Arabian Sea and larger factors such as a weak positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) - an ocean-atmosphere phenomenon with difference in sea surface temperatures characterised by cooling in parts of Indian Ocean leading to enhanced rain - ensured active monsoon conditions through most of the month allowing westerly winds to bring in a lot of moisture over the city,” said a senior IMD official.
Professor Sridhar Balasubramanian, department of mechanical engineering and IDP Climate Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay said weather synoptic conditions were more active in Arabian Sea than Bay of Bengal, resulting in good rains over Mumbai during July. “Positive IOD indicates a warm pool of water in the west Arabian Sea (near Somalia). This is good for bringing moisture over to the west coast. The favorable IOD was witnessed last year as well. The presence of a moderate to strong offshore trough throughout July ensured steady and consistent rains breaking an all-time record,” he said.

Thundershowers were reported on at least 15 days in July as against the normal of three days for Mumbai, said Akshay Deoras, independent meteorologist and PhD researcher at the University of Reading, United Kingdom. “A preliminary analysis suggests that the number of rainy days in Santacruz this July has been higher than the normal of 23 days. Intense rain on most days occurred after midnight instead of early afternoon. Thus, increased thunderstorm activity seems to have played a major role in enhancing rainfall,” he said.


Though the city received excess rain for the month, showers evaded catchment areas. Even as Tulsi Lake overflowed on Tuesday, water stock across seven lakes supplying water to Mumbai was 32.7% of the required amount. Last year, it was 75% of the required quantum by this period. “
Since catchment areas are located further interior from the coast, cloud bands have not penetrated owing to weak wind drag. However, this is likely to change in August as the Bay of Bengal gets ready to churn a system,” said Balasubramanian adding, “The city could expect above normal rain for August.”
Mumbai has so far received 82.6% of its seasonal average rainfall from June 1 to July 28.


Mumbai records its wettest July, breaks all-time high monthly rain record
 

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Mumbai records its second highest July rain in 44 years, highest in 10 years
According to IMD, the last time Mumbai recorded the exact figure was in 1974 in July at 375.2mm.
MUMBAI Updated: May 27, 2020 17:09 IST


Badri Chatterjee


Badri Chatterjee
Hindustan Times, Mumbai


Heavy rains have led to severe flooding across many parts of the suburbs, delayed or cancelled flights as well as cancellation of the suburban train services.


Heavy rains have led to severe flooding across many parts of the suburbs, delayed or cancelled flights as well as cancellation of the suburban train services.(KunalPatil/HTPhoto )



Torrential downpour, especially in the suburbs, between Monday night and Tuesday morning led to Mumbai recording its second highest July rain over a 24-hour period since 1975 or 44 years after the 2005 deluge (July 26, 2005 floods that killed over 1,000 people), which was the highest with 944mm in 24-hours. However, the quantum of rain was the highest 24-hour July rain in 10 years.
Between 8.30am Monday and 8.30am Tuesday, the Santacruz weather station, representative of the suburbs and Mumbai, recorded 375.2mm rain, falling under the ‘exceptionally heavy’ category (when the amount of rainfall is highest recorded for the season or over a decade, according to the India Meteorological Department). According to IMD, the last time the city recorded the exact figure was in 1974 in July at 375.2mm.

The maximum quantum of rain was recorded between 11.30pm and 8.30am from Monday night to Tuesday morning with a whopping 241mm rain recorded as the suburbs had recorded 134.2mm till 11.30pm Monday night. This led to severe flooding across many parts of the suburbs, delayed or cancelled flights as well as cancellation of the suburban train services.

Exceptionally heavy overnight downpour took Mumbai’s rain total to 982.2mm between June 1 and July 2, 8.30am, which is in excess of 411.2mm for this period. In 24 hours, Monday 8.30am to Tuesday 8.30am, Mumbai covered 44.6% of its July average rain – 375.2mm against average rain for the month at 840.7mm.

Colaba on the other hand, representative of south Mumbai, recorded ‘very heavy’ rain at 137.8mm between Monday 8.30am and Tuesday 8.30am.

According to the weather department’s classification, 15.6mm to 64.4mm of rain is considered ‘moderate’, 64.5mm to 115.5mm is ‘heavy’, 115.6mm to 204.4mm is ‘very heavy’ and more than 204.5mm is ‘extreme’.


Mumbai records its second highest July rain in 44 years, highest in 10 years
 

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11 dead, 40 lakh affected as flood situation worsens in Bihar
Most of the rivers are flowing above danger marks at several places while others are showing a rising trend, an official of the water resource department of north Bihar said on Thursday.
india Updated: Jul 30, 2020 22:19 IST


Bishnu K Jha and Ajay Kr Pandey | Edited by Anubha Rohatgi



Bishnu K Jha and Ajay Kr Pandey | Edited by Anubha Rohatgi
Hindustan Times, Darbhanga / Muzaffarpur


A woman with two children rows a small boat in a flooded field in Bhagalpur district of Bihar, July 28, 2020.

A woman with two children rows a small boat in a flooded field in Bhagalpur district of Bihar, July 28, 2020.(REUTERS)



The flood situation in north Bihar has worsened following incessant rains in the catchment areas of all major rivers of the region, including Gandak, Budhi Gandak, Bagmati, Lakhandei, Kamala Balan and their tributaries.
Over 39.6 lakh people in 972 panchayats in 108 blocks of 14 districts have been affected by floods while 11 people have lost their lives.
Most of the rivers are flowing above danger marks at several places while others are showing a rising trend, an official of the water resource department of north Bihar said on Thursday.
The Burhi Gandak was flowing nearly 1.5 meter above the danger mark at Sikandapur in Muzaffarpur town while the Bagmati had touched 56 meter at Kataujha, nearly 0.75 meter above the danger mark. Gandak was flowing at 54.31 meter near Rewaghat, barely 10 cm below the danger mark.

A Darbhanga-based lawyer Sudhir Kumar Choudhary, who is stranded in his native village under Hanuman Nagar block for a week due to floods, said, “The power supply was snapped in the entire area after inundation of Poariya sub-station over a week ago.”
The state-highway between Darbhanga and Samastipur was flooded at several places between Taralahi village to Bishunpur. The district administration has enforced restrictions on plying of heavy vehicles through the marooned region.
A bulletin issued by the Central Flood Control Room stated that extreme flood situation continued even as the Adhwara river at Bishunpur was flowing at 48.71 metre, 1.31 metre above the danger level on Thursday morning.

The flood situation in Kusheshwar Asthan block continues to remain grim even as swollen Kosi, Kamla Balan and Kareh rivers inundate villages. Darbhanga district magistrate Thiyagrajan SM said district administration was taking all measures to mitigate the miseries of flood-hit people by setting up community kitchens, providing boats and medical assistance.
Muzaffarpur district disaster management officer Atul Kumar Verma said all precautionary measures were being taken to save the town from Budhi Gandak as its water had entered into six places around the town periphery and breached the safety and ring bunds.
“We are focusing to save the national highway 77 apart from the railway track along the Muzaffarpur-Sitamarhi sections of NHAI and East Centeral Railway,” he said, apprehending that the flood water would enter in Sri Krishna Medical College and Hospital if any breach will occur along NH 77.


 

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Furious Flood Water Engulfs Streets In Rajasthan, Bihar, Assam | ABP Special | ABP News
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•Jul 30, 2020




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In today's ABP special, you will see how streets are not visible in Rajasthan's Boondi as they have been completely engulfed by floodwater. Residents shot videos of the rare sight as mere spectators while water gushes past their houses.India has been wailing due to flood situation in at least five states including Assam, Bihar, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh.Watch this report.
 

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When Car Was Washed Away In Overflowing Stream | ABP Special | ABP News
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•Jul 30, 2020



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A car was washed away in Andhra Pradesh's Anantapur and now the incident's video is going viral. The car passengers were trying to cross the overflowing stream by following a bus that was able to cross within seconds. But the efforts failed as the current of water was very strong and it took away the car with its flow.Fortunately, there were no casualties. Watch this report.
 

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Disturbing Visuals Of Floods From Bihar, Karnataka And Uttarakhand | ABP News
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•Jul 30, 2020


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Several places in Karnataka, Bihar and Uttarakhand are submerged in floodwater these days. Floods caused by heavy rainfall in these states have created a lot of trouble for the locals.Many districts have been submerged in floodwater in Bihar.Watch these visuals to see how floods have created trouble for the people living in Bihar, Karnataka and Uttarakhand.
 
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