Trekking and Photography

hensil

Guru
Micah,
That's an absolute fantastic write-up. I have done few trekking (all for photography) and concur with all that you have said.
One thing where my opinion differs from yours is the camera gear. I have carried DSLR's on trekking and find them to be most inconvenient compared to the smaller mirrorless m43 and 1" sensors. Now, I have Panasonic GF1 and Nikon V1 for trekking. The picture quality and functions is up to DSLR's though in a small package, also the greater depth of field is better for landscapes.
Try it and you'll agree with me.
Thanks for posting the link.
Henry
 
Micah,
That's an absolute fantastic write-up. I have done few trekking (all for photography) and concur with all that you have said.
One thing where my opinion differs from yours is the camera gear. I have carried DSLR's on trekking and find them to be most inconvenient compared to the smaller mirrorless m43 and 1" sensors. Now, I have Panasonic GF1 and Nikon V1 for trekking. The picture quality and functions is up to DSLR's though in a small package, also the greater depth of field is better for landscapes.
Try it and you'll agree with me.
Thanks for posting the link.
Henry
Hi Henry, I agree the mirror-less options look like a good comprise between weight, flexibility, and image quality. And the technology is advancing quite rapidly in the mirrorless line while its advancing much slower now for the dslrs. The size and weight is a clear advantage for the mirrorless, the one thing I wonder about is the battery lifetime when using an electronic veiw finder all the time. Do you find that an issue? What's the longest time you've been out with out electricity an how many batteries did you need? Thanks for the input, Micah
 

hensil

Guru
Micah,
The Pana GF1 gives approx. 400 pictures with an external VF and 350 with an LCD. I have 3 batteries for GF1.
The Nikon V1 gives more than 500 pictures with VF. I have 6 batteries for this because it shares the same battery with D800 which I also have. So you see I never had any problem running out of juice.
I shoot several time lapse videos with V1.
Henry
 

zack2137

Leh'd and how!
That's an informative writeup. Recently on a snow trek, I had issues carry my backpack, camera bag (against backpack styled) and tripod together. I still managed it lugging it all the way through. Another issue was changing lenses, particularly in snowed out terrain. There was water on my hands and surroundings and I couldn't keep either of the lens or the camera down. How do you deal with such situations?
 

hensil

Guru
That's the main reason I don't use the back-pack while on the shoot. I use the back-pack only to carry my equipment while traveling. Once I reach the destination I transfer my equipment into 2 holster bags for 2 cameras with lens attachment and also wear a vest which helps in keeping accessories and lens while changing.
Henry
 

rkbharat

Guru
Nice article.

I am planning few trekking trips, mainly for photography and selecting gears will be tough.

I will be mainly carrying 70-200 with nikon D7000 and an UWA with Nikon D800. Getting a mirrorless is not an option for now

My confusion, how to keep both of them accessible and shot ready during the trek. On short walks I use BlackRapid straps and those are quite comfortable. But I think for the mountain trekking it will be tough.

Lets assume if I have to keep my shoulder luggage below 10 kg (offcourse with some luggage (Tent, Sleeping Bags, Tripod etc) on the mules), 5 kg goes to the above gears, and extra battery, filters, etc. And rest 5 kg for food, water, woolens etc. Is that a realistic way of calculating?

How do you safe gaurd gears from sudden rain or snowfall. I not that worried of snow or light shower as my gears can take up light shower or light snow without a trouble.

At this point I have three type of backpack, Lowepro ProTreker 600aw, which is a jumbo and in it self weighs 4 kg, eating up my 40% weight budget. Then I have another Day trek backpack, which can takeup up water sac, few woolens, some food/medicines and other sundry things, but no space for gears. And a third 40 ltrs proper trekking backpack, very light - around 2 kg I guess, but no proper partitions for camera gears, its a typical trekking back pack

So how should I arrange things now?

BTW what should be the ideal maximum weight on the shoulder for the moutain trekking, for a novice, average fit person, assuming a 5-6 hours trek a day for 6-7 days

Note : I have very less to no trekking experience
 
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hensil

Guru
Two years ago I went to Bhutan and had an opportunity of a day trek to a place called 'Tiger's Nest'. It was a 3 hours moderate climb. I carried D7000, three lenses and a tripod, shooting video.
I'm not an athlete but keep myself fit doing regular work-outs and jogging. In my younger age, I was a gold medalist National Power Lifting Championship and several State championship.
After this introduction i want to say that I was totally exhausted by the end of the trek. At one time I even found a liter of water bottle too heavy to carry. I wanted to leave the tripod half way and then pick it up while returning. In short, trekking is very difficult if not experienced.
I would suggest you cut down on camera equipment and other stuff to bare minimum. Take the lighter D7000 and one lens. Just forget the tripod unless you have a mule to carry your luggage. You can use a small bean bag for slow shutter. Carry a large garbage bag in case of heavy rains or you can tuck your camera under your rain coat. But seriously, don't carry 2 cameras.
Micah will guide you better, as he is a seasoned trekker.
All the best.
Henry
 
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