Which LCD TV

Yogesh Sarkar

Administrator
Is HD ready equals proper implementation of HD or just close to it?

Also another thing you guys might want to keep in mind, there are two HD formats, one is 720p and another 1080p. 1080p has much higher resolution than 720p.
 

stereoguy

RECLAIMED LIFE
Great Inputs YS :)

As mentioned by YS its just that the LCD/ Plasma would be HD ready ... it cant be anywhere compared to the actual HD quality (1080p) available in brands such as Toshiba .. higher ends , Sharp .....higher end .

Be clear with what you need .... as it is directly propotional to the costing aspect .

The more sugar you add the more sweet the dish would be ...... make sure you aren't a diebetic ;)

Happy Viewing !
 
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Yogesh Sarkar

Administrator
Another thing I saw on ebay was the normal computer LCD monitors being sold along with external TV tuner boxes, which don't require a PC. Now a LCD monitor is usually less expensive than a LCD and usually has better resolution (you can get 1080p 22" screen for 10-11k). However I am not quite sure how good/bad the performance would be, however if you are ok with building an HTPC and or connecting it with your regular computer, I guess it should be alright.
 

stereoguy

RECLAIMED LIFE
Another thing I saw on ebay was the normal computer LCD monitors being sold along with external TV tuner boxes, which don't require a PC. Now a LCD monitor is usually less expensive than a LCD and usually has better resolution (you can get 1080p 22" screen for 10-11k). However I am not quite sure how good/bad the performance would be, however if you are ok with building an HTPC and or connecting it with your regular computer, I guess it should be alright.
YS : I would like to differ here . :cool:
As a HD ready TV can't be compared to the actual HD Quality .
So can't the LCD monitor be compared with a LCD TV :)

LCD TVs are designed for use in higher light situations such as a bright room, LCD monitors are designed for use in controlled light environments such as offices.

Technically ,TV (HD/SD digital), and DVDs both look much better on the LCD TV than they do on the monitor .

Another matter of consideration would be the aspect ratios /pixel plotting of the LCD TV / LCD Monitors .

Budget LCD monitors are bound to generate high interlacing and would for surely leave retraces (leaving picture marks / fading logos ).

If gone for higher end LCD Monitors such as Apple 20" , Dell UltraSharp 2405FPW , The scene would be diffrent altogether .

Depends on the weight in your pocket ;)

Same price range - LCD Tv's would be superior for TV / DVD viewing rather than a LCD mionitor .

Technical Specs :

A LCD monitor is designed specifically for use with a computer. The display ratio of a computer wide-screen is 16:10. The display ratio of an LCD TV is 16:9.

Monitors usually have vastly higher resolution than LCD TVs (as evidenced by the specs ). This can lead to numberous minor visual annoyances (tearing, flashing, rough edges) and bluring of low definition video (like from a non-digital cable TV source). LCD TVs look fine from a non-digital cable source, and generally handle digital video better as well.

Computer fonts and just about everything else computer-picture-related are designed to adjust to true computer resolutions....640x480, 1024x768, 1280x1024, 1920x1200, etc. The built-in hardware scaling of an LCD monitor will automatically repair most distoritions.
LCD TVs have different aspect ratios and do not scale properly with computer ratios ( connecting a Laptop to a LCD ).

Most modern LCD monitors have hardware scaling built-in (esp w/ widescreens). Very few LCD TVs will have such devices, because scaling would fall outside of its intended use as a TV.

LCD TVs have built-in speakers (esp in smaller units), and have a built-in TV tuner. Note, such tuners are rarely, if ever, true HDTV tuners. Instead, most TVs rely on an external HDTV tuner, and take signal via RGB, S-Video, or DVI. LCD TVs display DVD and HDTV perfectly. LCD Monitors will either show a tiny 'blackout' region at the top and bottom (due to the different aspect ratio), or will stretch the video with their onboard scaling hardware.
Though a little difference between the two, the monitor will tear an image or show defects more readily than an LCD TV.
 
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Prasham

Armchair Traveller :(
From what I've seen till now, most HD Ready LCD TVs have 720p while Full HD LCD TVs have 1080p. I am not sure of technical specifications of HD but above is what I have observed across the brands.
 

stereoguy

RECLAIMED LIFE
From what I've seen till now, most HD Ready LCD TVs have 720p while Full HD LCD TVs have 1080p. I am not sure of technical specifications of HD but above is what I have observed across the brands.
Truly said :)

Bottom line reamins : What's the ouput targetted :) ..... be clear with what you are shopping for !

Don't be :confused:
 

tsk1979

Reclaimed and Recycled
Nowadays most brands have true HD 1080p TVs
Cost is around 40k
I got LG 32" HD ready, i.e. 720p and 1080i
Max resolution supported is 1MP
But since I bought last year true HD units were available only in larger sizes.

If you want innovation Panasonic is the best bet, as they introduce the latest first.
Sony and samsung use same panel, so choose according to price
LG is what I have, and I am happy with it

Best is to go to multi brand store, chose your TV, and head over to small shop and buy(with bill and warranty of course)
 

anupmathur

Super Moderator
Staff member
Now a LCD monitor is usually less expensive than a LCD and usually has better resolution (you can get 1080p 22" screen for 10-11k).
YS : I would like to differ here . :cool:
As a HD ready TV can't be compared to the actual HD Quality .
So can't the LCD monitor be compared with a LCD TV :)
And I would like to disagree here about your disagreement!
It is far more cost effective to go with what YS suggested.
Hardly any of us are without budget constraints. If you want true HD and a smallish size, settle for a computer monitor!

BTW, Stereoguy, any source to support what you've said about brightness/contrast ratings?
I find that any monitor I've used is capable of giving results as good as any TV in normal ambient light conditions! Never got the feeling I should turn off a few lights to view on a monitor.

Monitors are usually poorer at playing DVDs etc. because of software constraints in the PC, as compared to a purpose built hardware player!

Kindly correct me if I'm going wrong somewhere. :)
 

tsk1979

Reclaimed and Recycled
The problem with LCD monitor instead of LCD TV is refresh rate. So fast moving scenes tend to drag. Best way to test is to watch credits rolling or watch the BSE/NSE tickers which go sideways.
you will also need a TV tuner card along with your monitor
 

stereoguy

RECLAIMED LIFE
And I would like to disagree here about your disagreement!
It is far more cost effective to go with what YS suggested.
Hardly any of us are without budget constraints. If you want true HD and a smallish size, settle for a computer monitor!

BTW, Stereoguy, any source to support what you've said about brightness/contrast ratings?
I find that any monitor I've used is capable of giving results as good as any TV in normal ambient light conditions! Never got the feeling I should turn off a few lights to view on a monitor.

Monitors are usually poorer at playing DVDs etc. because of software constraints in the PC, as compared to a purpose built hardware player!

Kindly correct me if I'm going wrong somewhere. :)
Anup Sir ! as mentioned by YS the monitors surely are supposed to have higher resolutions then the Tv's , its just that they leave retraces when used as Tv's ( that's a personal expereience , may differ ) , the disagreement was on for the view that Monitors can be considered as a replacement for the LCD TV .... basic operation being the TV / DVD watching .

Its can be considered as a workaround ....
Totally agree with the fact that all of us are with budget constraints .... as its our hard earned money !

Depends on the output an individual is targetting :)
 
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